The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Brei

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by gdl203, May 20, 2007.

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  1. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    Another yes here.

    I think you'll find that very very few of the serious real dress watches from the better names have lumed hands or hour markers. Think about it - how many ultra thins have lume anywhere?

    IMO lume on dress watches is one of those compromises that too many consumers with pedestrian taste ask for and some brands cave in to, like date functions on everything.
     
  2. ~ B ~

    ~ B ~ Senior member

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    The Parmigiani Tonda uses lumed hands, as do most of the brand's watches. Such watches will look pretty bad in a few years when the lume discolours. Fine on a sporty watch but not on a dress piece.

    Lets them save on gold for the hands as well.

    Speaking of material cost cutting, it continually surprises me how many "high-end" brands skimp on using a solid silver base for their dials, and 18k gold for their batons and hands. Only Lange among the big brands uses a sterling base, the others use "silvered" dials which in non-marketing spiel speak translates to silver-plated. Silver isn't an expensive material to begin with, even more so should plated silver never be seen on a 5 figure watch.

    What next, chrome-plated cases? (come to think actually JLC was guilty of this just a few eecades ago!)
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  3. Newcomer

    Newcomer Senior member

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    Are we talking about a pure dress watch, i.e. VC Patrimony, PP Calatrava, etcetera? If so, I cannot readily think of one.

    But the Master RDM, Master Memovox, and Master Control all have green dots (and lumed hands).

    And then we have this lovely piece:

    [​IMG]

    Oh, and this one:

    [​IMG]

    Of course, these are not dress watches per se.

    Lume on a "dress watch" is an abomination. I think it is fine on these types of pieces that straddle the line between dress and casual.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  4. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    I think the traditional material for dials is brass, not silver. As you're probably well aware enameled dials are traditionally either gold or copper.

    Silvered dials are not traditionally plated, but rather painted with silver nitrate, which is a very different process.

    While I agree with the point re: batons & hands, I'm not sure I see the inherent superiority of a silver dial over a brass dial except in perceived value for money.

    In most cases I would argue that manufacturers should pay attention first to other dial things like riveted v glued batons, vitreous vs cold enamel dials, and general finish of the dial as opposed to the underlying dial material, etc as opposed to dial material.

    For some reason you've just reminded me of another one of my pet dislikes - power reserves on automatics... :facepalm: Oh, and another one - painted blue hands on many JLC Master models. :facepalm: :facepalm:
     
  5. Newcomer

    Newcomer Senior member

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    Really? Power reserves on automatics to me occasionally make sense. It lets me know how much time I have before I have to wear it, or how active I am being. Don't get me wrong, they are more useful on a hand wind, but I don't mind a power reserve on an automatic insofar as it makes "sense." I agree that power reserves often ruin a dial though (READ: Grand Seiko). On the IWC Portuguese 7-Day I think it is a harmonious integration.

    As for painted blue hands--that is sacrilege! I do not know why they chose to do that on the new RDM. One of my biggest peeves about that model.
     
  6. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    How much time left before you next need to wear an automatic? Sounds to me like a hint to thin the herd to get that automatic back into regular rotation! Well, that and #firstworldproblems ;) :p

    In older automatic watches designed around the power reserve (e.g. Future Matic) or with relatively inefficient winding mechanism (e.g. Power Matic) I sort of see a point, but I am pretty sure that on most modern automatics the mechanism is sensitive enough to wind with even minimal wrist movement - like if you were just walking, or typing, for example.

    And think about it... you need a power reserve to tell you how active you are... you probably need to be a lot more active! Zumba lessons, perhaps? :)

    Oh on 7 day power reserves I make an exception - as that is an achievement worth highlighting. On the far more humble reserves which are the norm I find the inclusion of the power reserve a little puzzling.

    As always, just my 0.02.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  7. chobochobo

    chobochobo Rubber Chicken Dubiously Honored Moderator

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    can you answer your pms please?
     
  8. in stitches

    in stitches Kung Joo Moderator

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    newcomer - thanks for the examples, that is what i was talking about, particluarly the first pic. i see these kinds of watches on the dressier side, and prefer no lume. the lange has a white lume though, and its pretty minimal, that i dont mind.

    pained blue hands is lame.

    power reserve on autos dont bother me, its just a fun complication that can add harmony to a dial, imo.
     
  9. in stitches

    in stitches Kung Joo Moderator

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    also, i dont really mind about hand and base material all that much.

    also, i think silver is not super easy to deal with, and it could easily tarnish if there was any air getting in due to a bad gasket or something. its not super practical. and using gold or plat for a movement base would be quite expensive and for no real benefit imo.

    just my opinion.
     
  10. Newcomer

    Newcomer Senior member

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    I completely agree with you there. Well, with a 43 hour power reserve (RDM, MUT Moon) I find them kind of useless. You can just sort of guesstimate when your watch is going to die. But with a watch that is more than three days, I would like to be able to wear it for the day, and then know when I need to wear it again so that it won't die. For me, it definitely is not a make or break, but it is nice sometimes!

    Ha and I have my 'physical activity' watches :). My Orient Mako I don't think has ever died. And that is just from about an hour or so of running a day! But with my JLC, it is normally only worn when I am sitting, or walking to and from my car. And I take off my watches when I type. So sometimes it dies and I feel lazy! Most of my time is spent wearing my Speedmaster, but I try to keep my automatics wound up by wearing them at different points of the day.

    And I definitely agree! The way that I look at is, is that as far as complications go, it seems to be about the most useful, other than the date and time. Even on an automatic, a power reserve is a whole lot more useful than a moonphase!

    At the end of the day, this may be the definition of firstworldprobs. Always fun!


    For some reason I kind of like the Patek. It is super quirky. That is something that really draws me to a watch. I like to sympathize with the ugly duckling.
     
  11. MSchott

    MSchott Active Member

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    I agree that power reserve indicators can be more useful on an automatic watch than on a hand wound timepiece. Unless you have a HW watch with a long power reserve you will wind it daily as it is so the PR indicator is superfluous. On an automatic watch, especially one that is not worn daily, you will know when it's about to die. In reality most PR indicators are not needed. Personally I'd look at a large date complication or moonphase before a PR.
     
  12. in stitches

    in stitches Kung Joo Moderator

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    i hear ya.

    also, apparently, that is why my wife married me. :rimshot:
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  13. Flake

    Flake Senior member

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    I have a Blancpain with a black dial and gold hands that's actually somewhat difficult to read in low light, although quite striking in good light. It had lume sort of hidden in the tips of the hands (not really hidden but very subtle). Interestingly, it's easiest to read in the dark, thanks to the lume.
     
  14. Flake

    Flake Senior member

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    Today:

    [​IMG]

    Breguet has been getting a lot of wrist time lately.
     
  15. no frills

    no frills Senior member

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    Quote:Hehehehe. Same here!
     
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