The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Brei

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by gdl203, May 20, 2007.

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  1. mimo

    mimo Pernicious Enabler

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    I guess it's like a house, a car or anything else: if you buy something as an investment vehicle, a lower price or depreciation are upsetting. But if you love it and want to keep it, it's worth what you were willing to pay.


    Oooh...maybe...



    .[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013


  2. DLJr

    DLJr TWAT Master.

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    I don't think paying MSRP is against SF rules, nor is it snobbish. Everyone makes the decision on their own.

    In house versus ETA goes beyond finishing for me. However, if you wish to trivialize the way others prioritize the details of their watch purchases because it differs from yours, so be it.
     


  3. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    Thatguy sounds like a Tag Heuer PR guy's wet dream


    :hide:
     
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  4. Kaplan

    Kaplan Senior member

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    :)

    Speaking of colours, this was new at SIHH 2013

    [​IMG]

    Also stumbled across an auction from a little over a year ago, with both blue, red and brown reversoes from the early 30's. Some fetched 4-5 times the estimate. Picks here .
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013


  5. ThatGuy

    ThatGuy Senior member

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    LOL... sure I am.

    You guys seem like any "manufactures" wet dream.

    BRB Richemont owns most of the brands you get all excited about.

    Oh, my. Judging a book by its cover?

    Haters gonna hate. Sorry, I don't do herd mentality
     


  6. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    Now you sound like a Seagull PR guy's wet dream

    Keep digging!
     
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  7. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    That blue duo face is nice, but would have been nicer if the white face was... Well, nicer. It's sad and a little telling to see all the publicity photos showing the blue face but not the white one.

    It would have been a home run if they had channeled one of the old reversos with the circle on the dial and the central seconds hand, the seconds centrale, for the white face.

    I've heard some people say that it would have been great if JLC had released the new blue as another TTR 1931 edition, but I'm with Jerome Lambert on this choice - its not a winning formula to release multiple limited editions of the same model with minor superficial changes... A very refreshing pov from a ceo in these times (cough, AP, cough)...
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013


  8. in stitches

    in stitches Kung Joo Moderator

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    :bounce2:
    have been on both sides of that equation, and i could not agree more.
     


  9. johanm

    johanm Senior member

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    Tag is the latest company to shift focus to in house movements - http://www.calibre11.com/tag-heuer-movement-strategy-2012/

    IMO, much of the WIS fixation on movements comes out of a desire to add intellectual substance to an otherwise pretty vacuous and inconsequential hobby. I'm sure that stamp collectors and furries have similar classifications and hierarchies to rationalize their pursuits. That said, there are many ways that an optimized movement can substantively improve a watch, in such areas as accuracy, reliability, dial configuration, case proportions, and useful complications.
     


  10. Dino944

    Dino944 Senior member

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    Very tempting [​IMG]. I will certainly become a Reverso ebuddy with you one day. However, I think the MRS will have me shot, stuffed, and mounted above the fireplace if I buy anything major before we know where we stand with our taxes. So...DEETS please...
    [​IMG]
    +1 on on Jermone Lambert's choice.

    I am undecided on whether I like the blue Reverso. I think its a model I will have to see in person before making a judgment.
     


  11. rnguy001

    rnguy001 Senior member

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    A little Portuguese today

    [​IMG]
     


  12. Dino944

    Dino944 Senior member

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    I'm sure you know the original purpose of finely finishing/decorating a movement was to remove all rough surfaces and edges so as to reduce friction that could rob a movement of accuracy and power.

    Today, with the machines that are currently available, most movements are quite accurate, and the finishing/decorating is IMHO about creating something of beauty and something thats not a disposeable good, such as a plastic quartz watch. This is true with many high end goods. Why do people buy a Kiton suit or a John Lobb shoes, or bespoke suit and shoes? There are suits and shoes that cost less that have nice fabrics or good quality leather and varying degrees of hand workmanship. Yes, someone might seek out a bespoke suit if they have an unusual build or issue that makes something off the rack a tough fit. But for a person of average build, a $1,200 suit and $400 shoes may last a person just as long as a $5,500 suit and $4,500 pair of shoes. So why spend the extra money? I've never seen anyone undo the buttons and roll up the sleeves on a suit jacket, when the jacket sleeves have real button holes. Except prior to making a purchase in a store you don't generally see people other than tailors or cobblers spend a lot of time looking at the stitching inside a jacket or inside a shoe. Anyone can buy a mass produced, machine made suits, shoes, watches etc. On some level hand workmanship on a watch, or finely finished item of clothing represents real effort, care and quality in a good. Its something to take care of, to enjoy, to admire for its history, its beauty and on some level its rarity. If none of these factors matter than why not wear a cheap plastic watch from the covenience store?

    While some people don't care what movement is in a watch, there is no denying there is a vast difference between the movement found in a Tag, Omega, Breitling, or Rolex and say the movement found in a Lange. Granted the others are designed to be more rugged, and the Lange is a dress watch that can double as artwork for the wrist. I think there is more to the issue of interest in movements than simply being an act of inserting intelectual substance into a hobby, but to each his own.
     


  13. JonF

    JonF Senior member

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    Gorgeous! One of my all time favourites.
     


  14. mimo

    mimo Pernicious Enabler

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    It seems to me that although such a passion might be "inconsequential", making it about workmanship and, let's face it, difficulty, at least gives such a pastime some meaning. We live in a disposable age. I admire bespoke shoes or beautiful watches because they represent a human striving towards some kind of empirical, and impossible, perfection. It pleases me to think that someone worked hard for years to master an extraordinary skill, and then, perhaps with others possessed of complementary skills, produced something that could never have been made for a mass market.

    Whether that's a classic piece of design and a brilliantly managed industrial process to give mechanical reliability, like Rolex, or some sublime and original limited edition from a "top three" maker, I can relate to that process and feel emotional about it. Even the aforementioned IWC with a generic movement, can represent to me a stylistic history and integrity that has merit over other watches.

    I don't think anybody here really pretends that this passion is based on anything other than sentimental involvement in an idea. If we worried about empirical measures of timekeeping and value, we'd all have a quartz Sekonda (actually, I do). But just because a love of something is based on an unrealistic ideal, and items that are not inherently necessary, does not make it frivolous.

    Perhaps it's not for me to say as a "noob" in this subject, but I think it's like this: this stuff is art. Real art, reflecting originality, ambition, and the constant desire for improvement that is the curse of the human condition. It's a history of modern civilisation - a nod to the incomprehensible acceleration of technology over the last two hundred years, while retaining the greatest love for what has survived as useful throughout all of that time. Why anyone should love one manifestation over another is for discussion - hence this thread. But that they should love it at all?

    Ah, to know it is to love it. And now I'm starting to know, I'm in terrible trouble.
     


  15. johanm

    johanm Senior member

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    Dino - I'm not sure we're on the same page on clothes and shoes. I appreciate bespoke suits and fine shoes to the extent that they function better than their downscale counterparts, generally either by doing more to improve my appearance or comfort or by lasting longer. That's not to say finishing is unimportant just because it's imperceptible to a layman. I appreciate the appearance of fine pickstitching or handsewn buttonholes or well designed interior pockets even though they contribute only marginally to the primary functions of the garment. Still, I would evaluate each of those on their merits - how well they achieve what they set out to do - rather than considerations of rarity, provenance, exclusivity, etc. or that they reflect "care" or "effort". I acknowledge that in many areas of the luxury goods market, reasonable people put a premium on artisanal workmanship. I guess it's just an idiosyncratic blind spot for me, as personally I would make no distinction in value between two functionally equivalent items (at least standardized, unlimited production, utilitarian objects, i.e. not art) just because one was produced by an esteemed artisan's hand and the other in a factory.

    On watches, I have as much appreciation for anyone for movement engineering insofar as the purpose is to somehow improve functionality on the watch, as noted earlier, in areas such as accuracy, reliability, dial configuration, case proportions, and complications.
     


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