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The Watch Appreciation Thread - Part two (Rolex, Patek Philippe, Audemars Piguet, Jaeger LeCoultre,

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by mimo, Feb 12, 2016.

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  1. Dino944

    Dino944 Senior member

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    Thanks for clarifying your position. I do understand your position better, however I still disagree with some of it. In addition, whether one considers the hinged officers case of a 5054 an "Added feature" vs. a stylistic choice for the sake of a more vintage look is debatable. IMHO it is bit of both, but more of a style choice (as one can easily give a watch a sapphire back and skip the hinged back, or give an interchangeable back as was done on some of the 3970s).
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. yls2012

    yls2012 Active Member

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    This reasoning is bizarre. The Patek's thickness is okay because its hinged back is an "added feature," and its case could be made thinner? Meanwhile, the Lange 1's complications don't justify a thicker case (apparently because complications are somehow less legitimate "added features" than hinged casebacks). And it's somehow an advantage that the Patek could have been housed in a smaller case, while the Lange 1 couldn't.

    This seems totally backward: The Lange's complications are more interesting "added features" than the Patek's hinged caseback, and a thicker case on the Lange is therefore more forgivable. If anything, the inability to house Lange's movement in any smaller a case shows that the case was well designed, not poorly designed.

    As for the argument that Lange was trying to hark back to an ersatz history, I'm pretty sure the Lange 1 was a unique design in the 1990s, with no specific historical analog. It's hardly the case that Lange was trying to connect to its past with the Lange 1...
     
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  3. Belligero

    Belligero Senior member

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    Those are fantastic! I think Journe is making some class-leading watches, and I love how they look well-rooted in tradition, but without seeming boring or dated. How are you enjoying yours?
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2016
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  4. tricky

    tricky Senior member

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    I completely agree. I've recently become a bit obsessed with them.
     
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  5. OmarDubaibanker

    OmarDubaibanker Senior member

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    I have beef with them... I was in Paris and walking past their store and during the day they were closed for some reason and I didn't get a chance to go back! Gutted
     
  6. mimo

    mimo Senior member

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    French; probably on strike. Try Switzerland next time. :)
     
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  7. tigerpac

    tigerpac Senior member

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    Quote:Thanks so much! I've had the CS for a year and a half now and it has only grown on me more since getting it. My wife's Elegant is only a few months old but she's pretty much obsessed with it (to the detriment of the other nice watches she has). For me, Journe is such a great mix of genuine watchmaking, aesthetics, and his personal passion. Each watch design has a story behind it and the man himself will tell it to you. Such a classic aesthetic, but playful enough that it is so very interesting. And there's lots to like about the brand. The finishing isn't 'tiered' like a lot of other brands so you get the full experience across the brand lines. Hell the Bleu, the cheapest of the mechanical pieces, has the most difficult dial they produce, with failure rates still well over 50%. Something else I appreciate, even a simple watch like the CS has an interesting movement. Two barrels running concurrently - each lower-powered and with a flatter torque curve than a single barrel - thereby delivering a more steady power supply and resulting in better isochronism. One last thing I've found which I didn't expect but found out after buying the CS - the Journe collectors community is really great. Awesome group that love the man's work. The gtg's don't end up a pissing match as I've experienced in some other venues.
     
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  8. Belligero

    Belligero Senior member

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    ^
    Indeed, there's a lot to appreciate about Journe. It's great to see a watch with that level of attention to and mastery of the details. I think they're one of the few companies in the industry that has a deep and fundamental understanding of quality, and it shows throughout the product both visually and technically.
     
  9. kimmo

    kimmo Senior member

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    Try one on, it's not the biggest 42 mm out there. (manufacturers and their measuring standards.....)
     
  10. Belligero

    Belligero Senior member

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    Cripes — with all this dad-prep stuff, I forgot to post up that incoming I mentioned earlier; it arrived a week ago. :O


    As it's a steel Daytona with the white dial and black rings that seem to be all the rage these days, it's fair to say I was looking forward to it a bit...

    Just a quick shot for now:

    [​IMG]

    Now to figure out which ones to cull... :p
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2016
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  11. tricky

    tricky Senior member

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    Your priorities are out of wack. Watches first ;)

    Congrats that's an absolutely beauty. I would take that over the new ceramic ones.
     
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  12. Belligero

    Belligero Senior member

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    Thanks! I figure it's a good time to buy the OG ones right now while the hype is on the new one, which I'm not convinced will age as well as its predecessors. The black ceramic on polished links/lugs appears to have a whiff of TAG Heuer to it, but I'll reserve judgment until I see one in person. However, it sure seems to lack subtlety.

    The 4030-movement version essentially has the dial of the new one — which I do like — but with the old-school all-steel exterior; I figure it's the best of both worlds. Also, they definitely ain't making any more of 'em, and I don't think Rolex ever caught up with demand for these during their entire production run.

    After the affection my watchmaker had for the Zenith-based chrono after he took the 50XX/4030 movement training, I figured getting one was inevitable. He says that although they're more difficult to service, they're kinda fun to work on and something he looks forward to seeing on the bench. Sure, it's not as refined as the 4130, but it has a lot of character and is likely the most handmade movement Rolex has ever produced, and certainly the last of its type when it comes to how it was made.

    The movement doesn't show any evidence of having been serviced since it was produced in 1994, but it still works...

    [​IMG]
    Disregard the superfluous "d"; his English is much better than our Norwegian likely is.

    ...although not particularly well. The rate is a bit erratic and that amplitude is getting pretty low, but I figure it's remarkable that the movement is running at all after 22 years.

    [​IMG]

    A bit messy from the dried-up grease bits inside, but watertight and damage-free throughout. :thumbs-up:

    The downside of the Daytona (or any chronograph) is its increased service liability. Good to know that they can keep running so long, though. :D
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2016
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  13. Dino944

    Dino944 Senior member

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    Congrats on your 16520 Daytona!!! Definitely one of my favorite watches, and back when they were new it was my "Grail watch." Wait lists at some places were 3-5 years for it at list price, some places would only sell you one if you were a good customer or your also bought an all gold Rolex, or some ADs charged markups over MSRP of anything between 50 and 100% of the MSRP. It took me 2 years of stopping into any Rolex AD in towns I was traveling through to ask if they had any or if I could get on their wait list for me to obtain new ones at list price. However, the chase always gave me something to do in my spare time when I traveled, and it added to the excitement of finally obtaining them.

    Although, the 16520 is not as technically advanced as the out going 116520, I prefer it to the now out going model. I liked that it is truly one of the last Rolex watches to have a lot of hand workmanship as there were numerous modifications to the El Primero base movement. In addition, I prefer several of the aesthetics of the 16520, such as the symmetric subdial placement rather than them being shifted upward a few degrees. I like the contrast of the black subdial trim rings against the white dial more than the silver, and the smaller more elegant hour markers, which give it a slightly dressier feel than the larger lumed markers of later models. Also, when the 116520 was first released the hands and hour markers looked mismatched to me, as they retained the thin hands of the 16520 but gave it the thicker hour markers and lum on the dial. Thankfully Rolex resolved that issue by around 2005 with the "Fat hand" versions.

    Anyway, congrats on the new addition! Enjoy it in good health my friend! [​IMG]
     
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  14. bigbadbuff

    bigbadbuff Senior member

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    Having an insanely difficult time deciding between getting:

    New 116710BLNR
    Birth year Sub ('76)

    New 116610 Sub
    Birth year Pepsi GMT

    Every time I think I've decided one way I flip. I HATE being so wishy washy :censored:
     
  15. tifosi

    tifosi Senior member

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    That's a tough one. Although I really don't understand the whole "birth year" thing. It's really only a best guess as to when the watch was made so it doesn't really have any draw for me.

    For me, I'd go new. And it's up to you if you'd rather have a GMT function or not.
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. tim_horton

    tim_horton Senior member

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    The entirety of my (small) watch collection is dress watches, aside from a Casio G-Shock for the beach and the gym. No sports/dive watches at all. But I really like the looks of the new-ish Omega Seamaster 300 Master Co-Axial.

    [​IMG]


    I know it's an homage, and it has "distressed" lume, but I don't care. It's one of the nicest looking dive watches I've ever seen, and I usually hate dive watches.
     
  17. Dino944

    Dino944 Senior member

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    If you like vintage, go vintage. If you want new go new. Buy whatever puts the biggest smile on your face.

    Personally, I'm with @tifosi on the issue of birth year watches. Its one thing if your dad, uncle, grandfather etc. purchased a watch for you. during your birth year and/or it was made during your birth year. Then that would be a cool watch to have because of the family association. But a watch made approximately around your birth year, purchased and owned by a stranger (or strangers) for several decades is just a vintage watch.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
     
  18. Dillardiv

    Dillardiv Senior member

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    If this is a question of which two watches should you get- I would go with option A of new BLNR and vintage Sub. Biased as a BLNR owner, but it's amazing.
     
  19. Newcomer

    Newcomer Senior member

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  20. tim_horton

    tim_horton Senior member

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    Excellent. The Saxonia Thin's major flaw was that it was just too large. I never understood why they made it 40mm in the first place. Well, I do understand, modern trends towards larger sizes etc. but I don't think it worked out with the Thin.

    The price drop compared to the 40 mm version is nice as well.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2016

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