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bdavro23

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It’s not about intentions. It’s about design coherence and rationality. The OP is a sporty/casual watch that should be wearable in place of a dress watch in most cases. The Sub and Explorer are “professional” tool watches for rugged, active use. There is zero reason for the former to be bigger than the latter.
I tend to like smaller watches for the most part, or at least I dislike large watches. The DJ41 doesnt wear as large as its dimensions suggest, and I actually think it looks better proportionally than the 36. I also think the blue dial is the pick of the options and offers a really interesting composition.

The new OPs arent great, especially the ones you referenced are pretty garish, and I cant imagine a scenario where I would choose one over a DJ41. The outgoing, white dial OP39 on the other hand was pretty close to the ideal one watch, so I assume Rolex is planning a white dial Explorer in the near future to take that place.
 

taxgenius

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I tend to like smaller watches for the most part, or at least I dislike large watches. The DJ41 doesnt wear as large as its dimensions suggest, and I actually think it looks better proportionally than the 36. I also think the blue dial is the pick of the options and offers a really interesting composition.

The new OPs arent great, especially the ones you referenced are pretty garish, and I cant imagine a scenario where I would choose one over a DJ41. The outgoing, white dial OP39 on the other hand was pretty close to the ideal one watch, so I assume Rolex is planning a white dial Explorer in the near future to take that place.
I tried on the DJ 41 this week and I agree that it doesn't appear large, or at least, no one would describe it as large when worn.
 

mak1277

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I tend to like smaller watches for the most part, or at least I dislike large watches. The DJ41 doesnt wear as large as its dimensions suggest, and I actually think it looks better proportionally than the 36. I also think the blue dial is the pick of the options and offers a really interesting composition.

The new OPs arent great, especially the ones you referenced are pretty garish, and I cant imagine a scenario where I would choose one over a DJ41. The outgoing, white dial OP39 on the other hand was pretty close to the ideal one watch, so I assume Rolex is planning a white dial Explorer in the near future to take that place.
I would pay 20% over MSRP for a white dial Explorer if it had the black surrounds like the Polar Explorer 2
 

RJman

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never had a stronger urge to correct someone's post but as a German I have to say - please give the Germans in Stuttgart where Porsche is from their credit. Imagine I would say Ford is from Canada :)?
Well Dr Porsche did come to prominence under a certain Austrian-born leader... whose prejudices Ford also greatly admired.

also, please do not refer to foo as a cat.
 

Dino944

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never had a stronger urge to correct someone's post but as a German I have to say - please give the Germans in Stuttgart where Porsche is from their credit. Imagine I would say Ford is from Canada :)?
Oh, sorry my friend, but perhaps you are not aware that Porsche's original factory was in Gmund, Austria - not Stuttgart. In fact the earliest 356s are often referred to as Gmund Coupes.

Actually, since you are German...I'd expect you to know a little more about Porsche's history. ;) I think you lose at least 10 trivia points here today :rotflmao:
 
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dauster

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Well Dr Porsche did come to prominence under a certain Austrian-born leader... whose prejudices Ford also greatly admired.

also, please do not refer to foo as a cat.
fair enough even though I don't understand the cat and foo comment :)
 

am55

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I haven't seen that watch before. But it was really not a design that resonates with me. I don't love the case or crown (the wrong crown or one that seems too small is a deal breaker for me. I know weird, but I really dislike the crowns on FPJournes so I'd never buy one...I don't like how they look or trying to use them). The design on the dial is very subjective. Its not offensive, but it doesn't do much for me. I'm not a pen collector but the design reminds me of some Namiki pens my Dad used to buy (he collects all sorts of things such as watches, knives, pens etc). The price point is different, but maybe you have to love birds to spend that kind of money on a watch with birds on the dial. VC did a series of Audubon watches, but they didn't do much for me either. I don't quite know what the squiggles or SS are supposed to be near the image of the sun, but looking at it reminds me of the SS logo on old Chevy Montecarlos or Novas. In addition, although Foo and I rarely agree on much, I have similar issues with the the cost and the movement used in it. Sure it could be a more finely finished movement and not just dropped into the case in the state in which they get it, but for me it just doesn't sit well at that price point. To me a somewhat average movement that can be found in lots of less expensive watches can make the watch its sitting in seem like a fancy decoration to cover something ordinary.

I can understand you wanting a Chinese watch for you collection. Perhaps it would be a point of pride, much like how some Italian people feel about Ferrari or Lamborghini, or my Austrian friends feel about Porsches. There are no fine watches that would really have much to do with my heritage/ancestory, so that has never been an issue for me.

I tend to like watch brands and designs that are lasting, and have some history. Watches in my collection have designs that are roughly 40-100 years old. Its not planned that way, some just have designs I liked and as I researched them, I discovered their origins are quite old. It is rare for new brands to really be of a lot of interest to me. I like some Laurent Ferrier designs, but for what they cost, I don't really have a desire to own one. Plus with new companies, I wonder what happens if a company fails or parts become unavailable. I've mentioned it before, but a friend bought an Eterna for his wife years ago. After about 5-10 years of ownership she damaged the bezel. When he wanted to send the watch in for service and to have the bezel replaced, they told him they don't have any spares for that watch, so there is nothing they can do about the bezel.

Many Genta branded watches or his subsequent company Gerald Charles were rather forgettable regardless of the name on the dial.

Namiki Pens

View attachment 1543996

One of VC's Audubon watches.
View attachment 1543995
Thank you for the photos! The Namiki pens always looked beautiful to me, although back when I still used pens (*whinge whinge* "when I still had hair" *whinge whinge*) I also was working in more conservative workplaces and had to stick to conservative plain designs... As time passes there is less and less justification for a decent pen, even my government forms are filled in PDF and printed with a scanned signature and the banks have switched to 2FA. I've not put ink on paper for months.

The Audubon exemplifies what I think is a common issue with dials that depict something: putting the hands bang in the middle of the picture and "piercing" the subject. Maybe it stems from a desire for visual symmetry. The asymmetrical design from both Credor and BWF in this case works better.

For the S etc.: one approach to Asian art that descends from Chinese masters (and the Japanese were definitely inspired and referred to them, even during the autarky of Edo) is this attempt at hinting with the fewest strokes, with the Pine Trees by Hasegawa Tohaku one of the more famous examples. I'm not particularly impressed by this example, though, but that would be part of what I'd look for. It does not have to be fuzzy - Herge's drawing style is just fantastic at evoking, and very precisely so, with few strokes and very determinate lines. The other component which is related is using light and especially shadows - the best book I read on the subject was In Praise of Shadows by Tanizaki. But I think (and Tanizaki claims) that post Meiji, Japan more or less forgot about that philosophy, or at least it was replaced by the hybrid Western blend we know and love. Ironically, of recent collections, it is this new Cartier skeleton that best embodies a watch interpretation of that type of art IMO. But whether or not he intends it, Journe would be the maker whose work most ends up creating these impressions despite its definite, strong lines and clear choice of materials (think Octa Zodiaque or even the T10 which has such a simple dial and yet evokes so much).
 
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am55

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It’s not about intentions. It’s about design coherence and rationality. The OP is a sporty/casual watch that should be wearable in place of a dress watch in most cases. The Sub and Explorer are “professional” tool watches for rugged, active use. There is zero reason for the former to be bigger than the latter.
Are there still people stateside who use their Rolex for sports? I've never met anyone who does so in Asia despite the huge popularity of diving and other watersports in the region. 100% worn with suits or smart casual in town, switching to purpose built tools for sports (dive computer, Garmin, etc.).

The finishing touch for me was Biden wearing a steel bracelet at inauguration (whether or not the DJ, particularly in blue, is a dress watch) especially given his clear interest in suits which are much more inspired than his predecessors, within the constraints of political office.

Much as I have sympathy for the idea of a leather strap precious metal relatively simple watch with suits. It's like E type jags, which at the time were the epitome of sporty, and today are driven mostly by middle aged men slowly on weekends to car shows or whatever (I know only one exception, a British trader who takes his Russian girlfriend around the Alps in his, definitely driving it like it was meant to). The cultural shift does matter, and today a sub or even a Deepsea is man-jewelry of sorts, treasured, babied, and definitely a dress watch in most of the world.
 

TheFoo

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Are there still people stateside who use their Rolex for sports? I've never met anyone who does so in Asia despite the huge popularity of diving and other watersports in the region. 100% worn with suits or smart casual in town, switching to purpose built tools for sports (dive computer, Garmin, etc.).

The finishing touch for me was Biden wearing a steel bracelet at inauguration (whether or not the DJ, particularly in blue, is a dress watch) especially given his clear interest in suits which are much more inspired than his predecessors, within the constraints of political office.

Much as I have sympathy for the idea of a leather strap precious metal relatively simple watch with suits. It's like E type jags, which at the time were the epitome of sporty, and today are driven mostly by middle aged men slowly on weekends to car shows or whatever (I know only one exception, a British trader who takes his Russian girlfriend around the Alps in his, definitely driving it like it was meant to). The cultural shift does matter, and today a sub or even a Deepsea is man-jewelry of sorts, treasured, babied, and definitely a dress watch in most of the world.
All mechanical watches are functionally obsolete (though astronauts still wear mechanical Speedmasters because battery-powered watches can’t operate in the cold of space). So, design based on actual use is moot.

But in the context of classic/traditional dress, the only context in which the distinction between a dress vs. sport watch matters anymore, a dress watch should be discreet and slimly proportioned.

Further, even not caring about the above, a watch larger than it needs to be is a compromise to function, being both heavier and bulkier than necessary. People can buy whatever they want and fashions favoring larger versus smaller watches will come and ago, but ultimately functional/rational considerations will persist.

The problem with a 41mm Oyster Perpetual is that it is suboptimal for traditional dress and yet sized for fashionability over function. The only cross-section of buyers left are people who subscribe to short-term trends (namely, towards bigger watches).

The fact that the Submariner and Explorer are both smaller and more rugged than the OP41 merely highlights all of the above in plain sight.
 

reidd

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that actually wears much bigger than I thought it would, unless you have very skinny wrists.
I have somewhat slim wrists (about 7” I think) but I think it’s a good size for most anyone. The fluted bezel makes it visually wear a little bigger perhaps.
 

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