• CALLING ON HOME SEWERS TO HELP HEALTHCARE WORKERS FIGHTING COVID-19

    The lack of proper masks, gowns, and eyewear equipment is making it difficult for health workers to do their work fighting the novel coronavirus. In a recent New York Times article, medical workers said they were worried about how they can both fight the coronavirus without imperiling themselves, as well as their loved ones when they go back home.

    If you are a home sewer, please consider helping my joining Hickey Freman Technical Vice President Jeffery Diduch in his effort to produce and deliver homemade gowns and masks to medical professionals in the greater Rochester, New York Area. Read about how you can help here

    Fok and the Styleforum Team.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

LA Guy

Opposite Santa
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Mar 8, 2002
Messages
46,405
Reaction score
19,891
As for your aversion to Rolex because you have had problems with automatic movements in the past, were the issues with Rolex watches? Over the years I've owned roughly 16 automatic Rolex watches over the years and I've only ever had a problem with one, and it is the one you already own, a 116250 Daytona. I had a very early one that had some issues with the new cal 4130 chronograph mechanism. It was quickly fixed under warranty, and revisions/improvements continued over the years with that movement. None of my others ever had any issues with them and I used them for a lot of high impact activities, back before I knew one shouldn't wear them for things like hitting golf balls at a driving range, hitting balls in a batting cage, shooting 45 cal semi automatic pistols etc. Cheers!
Just that one and two vintage IWCs. I think that I might be moving through the world in slo-mo because of how fast some of them run. Servicing is such a PITA since I live in a small town, and I can't just run them into a good repair store. Luckily, I've found a couple of people nearby who are very good, and some are also officially certified to service certain brands. However, every service is a few hundred to close to a grand for a vintage chronograph, even one is nearly mint condition, and I figure that if I service 4 watches all at once, that is close to just getting something else.

These are all #firstworldproblems, of course, but if I can avoid them, I do. There are at least a half dozen handwinders from the 60s and 70s (this seems to be my sweet spot right now), and one from the late 50s, that I find pretty amazing, and that will, just because of the passage of time, probably not come up for sale again. So I'm concentrated on those right now. Hopefully, I will be able to get my grubby hands on many, if not all of them, in the next few years. After that, we'll see.

Re. Vintage Rolexes - I do find a number of them really compelling, but given that they seem both rather expensive compared to their counterparts, and also rather ubiquitous, that feel little urgency in getting them.
 

bdavro23

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2014
Messages
2,059
Reaction score
1,794
Just that one and two vintage IWCs. I think that I might be moving through the world in slo-mo because of how fast some of them run. Servicing is such a PITA since I live in a small town, and I can't just run them into a good repair store. Luckily, I've found a couple of people nearby who are very good, and some are also officially certified to service certain brands. However, every service is a few hundred to close to a grand for a vintage chronograph, even one is nearly mint condition, and I figure that if I service 4 watches all at once, that is close to just getting something else.

These are all #firstworldproblems, of course, but if I can avoid them, I do. There are at least a half dozen handwinders from the 60s and 70s (this seems to be my sweet spot right now), and one from the late 50s, that I find pretty amazing, and that will, just because of the passage of time, probably not come up for sale again. So I'm concentrated on those right now. Hopefully, I will be able to get my grubby hands on many, if not all of them, in the next few years. After that, we'll see.

Re. Vintage Rolexes - I do find a number of them really compelling, but given that they seem both rather expensive compared to their counterparts, and also rather ubiquitous, that feel little urgency in getting them.
I think one of the things that works both for and against Rolex is the consistency and longevity of their designs. I have been much more interested in vintage watches lately, and much of what is out there in the world from the 40s, 50s and 60s, are really interesting, unique pieces. The 70s brought us some crazy designs and the 80s brought us excess. For me, this is where a lot of the fun in collecting comes from. Finding unique or interesting designs that speak to me or tell a story make them compelling items to source and acquire. Throughout all these time periods, Rolex was relatively consistent and there were only a few designs outside of what is still available today (obviously there were different iterations, but the general design is mostly the same). To some, that can be a bit boring, and because of the Rolex premium, expensive. I bought a Universal Polerouter date last year that is immaculate for at most a quarter of the entry price for a Datejust of any age in working condition and it is endlessly more interesting to me.

On the other hand, Rolex has created the benchmark for many watch types in popular opinion. Dive watches will be judged against a Sub, GMT is a Rolex construct, you could argue the Speedie pro is the most recognizable Chronograph, but the Daytona cant be far behind, if at all. You could even say the Datejust is the standard by which dress watches are judged, despite it being created as a "sports" watch. It is hard to overstate the impact Rolex has had on the watch world.
 

usctrojans31

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2009
Messages
1,891
Reaction score
851
Sadly doesn't capture the imagination like Ferrari. The closest to Ferrari in terms of image and romance is probably Aston Martin, which likely has more to do with James Bond than anything.

Cartier warranty news. Cartier has a new program called Cartier Care. As of November 12, 2019, owners of watches that are still under the original 2 year warranty can register their watches for this program, which extends the warranty by an additional 6 years from the date of purchase (not to exceed 8 years from the date of purchase). All you need is the serial number to register. One does have to agree to get their email news, but here is the link for anyone who may have purchased a Cartier watch recently. https://www.cartier.com/en-us/services/cartier-care/extend-your-watch-warranty.html
With this and JLC's warranty extension, I have to assume that this will hit some (most? all?) additional Richemont brands too.
 

Texasmade

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2008
Messages
6,851
Reaction score
2,899
Sadly doesn't capture the imagination like Ferrari. The closest to Ferrari in terms of image and romance is probably Aston Martin, which likely has more to do with James Bond than anything.
McLaren has the F1 racing heritage and modern supercar performance. In terms of road car heritage, then AM probably is the closest to Ferrari.
 

Keith T

TWAT Master.
Joined
Apr 17, 2004
Messages
1,689
Reaction score
1,196
Yeah, that Searambler looks great! Probably my favorite dial in terms of the different colors they offer. And I think they're about to release another batch of these with a slightly modified bracelet.

"Then the Doxa guy shows up, orders a Mount Gay rum, and starts telling Dirk Pitt stories to anybody who will listen." :D
 

Dino944

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2011
Messages
5,317
Reaction score
4,013
Just that one and two vintage IWCs. I think that I might be moving through the world in slo-mo because of how fast some of them run. Servicing is such a PITA since I live in a small town, and I can't just run them into a good repair store. Luckily, I've found a couple of people nearby who are very good, and some are also officially certified to service certain brands. However, every service is a few hundred to close to a grand for a vintage chronograph, even one is nearly mint condition, and I figure that if I service 4 watches all at once, that is close to just getting something else.

These are all #firstworldproblems, of course, but if I can avoid them, I do. There are at least a half dozen handwinders from the 60s and 70s (this seems to be my sweet spot right now), and one from the late 50s, that I find pretty amazing, and that will, just because of the passage of time, probably not come up for sale again. So I'm concentrated on those right now. Hopefully, I will be able to get my grubby hands on many, if not all of them, in the next few years. After that, we'll see.

Re. Vintage Rolexes - I do find a number of them really compelling, but given that they seem both rather expensive compared to their counterparts, and also rather ubiquitous, that feel little urgency in getting them.
I haven't owned any vintage IWCs, so I can't speak as to their accuracy or issues regarding servicing them. Not sure how old they are but I do know a fw guys who say that with older pieces from some brands, one can't count on having the same accuracy that one may have from a newer watch. My oldest watch is now 25 years old, and I've had no issues with it and no problems with in terms of accuracy and it is an automatic Rolex.

Wishing you luck with whatever you decide to add to your collection.


Sadly doesn't capture the imagination like Ferrari. The closest to Ferrari in terms of image and romance is probably Aston Martin, which likely has more to do with James Bond than anything.

With this and JLC's warranty extension, I have to assume that this will hit some (most? all?) additional Richemont brands too.
McLaren is a cool car, with racing heritage, and its modern sports cars certainly can compete with Ferrari, but I agree there is a something that never makes me feel like they are quite in the same category as Ferrari. Maybe its because McLaren was on race tracks but didn't offer an actual line of road cars for many years. I didn't grow up ever seeing any on the road or at car events. Aston competed with Ferrari on the track and in the showrooms and I could occasionally see both when growing up. Both also have a certain romance Ferrari with its stories of Enzo and Aston with their ties to 007.

Yes, since JLC and Cartier have extended their warranties, I hope we will see the same with other Richemont brands in the near future.
 

Omega Male

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 30, 2013
Messages
3,054
Reaction score
4,546
Cartier warranty news. Cartier has a new program called Cartier Care. As of November 12, 2019, owners of watches that are still under the original 2 year warranty can register their watches for this program, which extends the warranty by an additional 6 years from the date of purchase (not to exceed 8 years from the date of purchase). All you need is the serial number to register. One does have to agree to get their email news, but here is the link for anyone who may have purchased a Cartier watch recently. https://www.cartier.com/en-us/services/cartier-care/extend-your-watch-warranty.html
That's quite impressive. Are luxury watch companies actually going to try taking care of their customers again as a business strategy, I wonder?
 

an draoi

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2018
Messages
273
Reaction score
319
In order to wound me, I'd have to first hold you in some regard. You're just a troll. There's a million of 'em out there.
You will note that I said you were "acting" wounded.

And no, not a troll. Just someone engaging in debate, as is common here. But if you choose to define a troll as anyone who doesn't subscribe to your world view, then that's your prerogative, I suppose. Just as you can choose to redefine bling in whichever way is necessary to help you to sleep easy knowing that you won't be mistaken for an arriviste or a Kardashian or one of those ghastly association footballers.

As we put the matter to bed, perhaps let's just reflect on how the Cambridge English Dictionary defines bling:

"jewellery or decoration that attracts attention because it is very noticeable and looks expensive".

I really like your Oris, by the way.

And finally, how about this for a fabulous - and fabulously sized - example of what we can surely all agree is definitely not bling:

MrT-Rolex-.jpg
 
Last edited:

Dino944

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2011
Messages
5,317
Reaction score
4,013
That's quite impressive. Are luxury watch companies actually going to try taking care of their customers again as a business strategy, I wonder?
Well we can always hope that we are returning to an era when companies and their retailers appreciate their customers. Although, tbh I've always been treated very well by sales people at Cartier Boutiques and Cartier ADs.

Sadly, I was recently at a shop that sells JLC, IWC, Omega, Chopard, Piaget, VC and a few other brands. The son's owner was quite nice and seemed like a good guy. However, the female sales associate who was assisting me and my friend, seemed rather dramatic and phony. Then she talked in a rather condescending manner about some brands of watches and people who buy those brands. She let me know that if it wasn't in their shop it was inferior (perhaps the watch and the owners?). My friend told me his wife doesn't like that saleswoman, and I had to say neither did I.
 

am55

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2014
Messages
3,208
Reaction score
2,278
How many are we talking about?- and in case you are looking to wear me down, i have been a Tech on Ferrari's.
so, yes. a "Car Guy". substance over bling.
Would you say Ferrari is about bling? Statistically speaking, taking a random sample of the population. Is the bling factor what gets people excited about these cars specifically vs a Koenigsegg or aforementioned McLaren?
 

Journeyman

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2005
Messages
7,398
Reaction score
2,499
Would you say Ferrari is about bling? Statistically speaking, taking a random sample of the population. Is the bling factor what gets people excited about these cars specifically vs a Koenigsegg or aforementioned McLaren?
I think a lot of it is about brand recognition, and prestige. Feeling that you've made it because you can afford such a car, and also wanting to show other people that you've made it.

Of course, there's also the excitement of owning a high-performance car but, in reality, how many people actually drive their cars fast, or take them out on the track, or use them for their supposed purpose? A very small percentage of overall owners of such cars.

It's largely the same with watches. Of course, we use them to tell the time, which is what they are designed to do. However, they're also used as signals - to advertise our taste, our wealth, our membership of a particular group of "in the know" people who appreciate the red letters on the dial of a particular brand of watch and so on.

Yes, we do enjoy nerdy things about the watches - knowing that it has a column wheel, being able to hear it tick and so on - but I think that an awful lot of it comes down to signalling of one kind or another, whether we actually like to admit it to ourselves or not. Otherwise, why all the fuss over certain watch models rather than others?
 

Dino944

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2011
Messages
5,317
Reaction score
4,013
All sports cars have a bling factor, especially in a world minivans and SUVs. I think vintage sports cars are more elegant and less blingy than some of their modern descendants. Still, they aren't for shy people as they do attract some attention. However, exotic cars also provide a driving experience that one generally doesn't get from a BMW, MB, Audis, Corvettes or Camaros.

Exotic cars are usually far less practical than BMWs, MBs, Audis etc. So unless the owner is retired and living in California or some other place, the cars are rarely driven on a daily basis. Most guys I know with exotics have a daily driver to commute to work in and that they can drive in snow and other bad weather. So perhaps there is less bling factor than say buying a BMW M series car or MB AMG car, or Camaro as the exotics probably are not seen on the road as often as those cars.
 

Lumaca

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Messages
206
Reaction score
323
Love it or hate it, you just have to admire how Rolex always creates a discussion. Every watch discussion eventually will mention the crown.

As much as I love Rolex, I can't deny that they have an inherent bling-ness to them. A quick google search:

5827F6C3-9143-4E28-86E2-5DB2DD48D16A.jpeg


meanwhile the second most name dropped brand:

459415C1-4D80-481B-A28F-F9ECA77A22E3.jpeg

as a side note, 5th place is Vacheron which was surprising!
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

WHICH TYPE OF SNEAKERS WORK BEST ON A FIRST DATE?

  • Classic Leather Low-Top

  • Canvas Plimsoll

  • Leather Slip-On

  • Canvas Slip-On

  • Athletic Kicks

  • Leather High-Top


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
435,872
Messages
9,366,345
Members
196,558
Latest member
jancyhock
Top