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The Ultimate Vass (Footwear) Thread (Pictures, reviews, sizing, etc...)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by luk-cha, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. Sammy - Ascot

    Sammy - Ascot Well-Known Member

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    I think Hazwanazni spot on with his recommendation. No doubt there's a touch more workmanship involved with the stitching to the Norweger uppers. They are both great design selected by NMWA - but the DM in Cognac is a touch more versatile with regards to burnishing, and functional if you travel much. Take both pairs if you can :)

    "The beautiful thing about cognac is that its light background allows more burnishing options hence, more personalisation. The captoe on the DM would be a great canvas for this, no so much for the norweger. I like both designs but not the stitching of the uppers of this norweger. Ever considered a pair of scotch grain double-monks?"
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. striker

    striker Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the gentlemen above who said that if the DMs fit properly, you should not be able to slip into it that easily without unbuckling it. I prefer loafers for flight and travel, just not loafers from Vass. Perhaps the monks you own are those with a slight bit of elastic on the straps that facilitate that without unbuckling the strap

    Just to share my personal experience, the Vass monks do not have the elastic component, I have to remove the top buckle to slip on and off the shoe, and I have a low instep so those with higher instep would find it even more challenging. In this regard, it is quite slow to remove and strap the buckle back on. I find that the blucher type split toe would be speedier of the two.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. RogerP

    RogerP Well-Known Member

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    I cannot even contemplate being able to stuff my foot into a fully buckled double monk. And I wouldn't do it if I could. Not sure where the notion took root that monks are essentially loafers, but it's not the first time I've heard it.
     
    2 people like this.
  4. tifosi

    tifosi Well-Known Member

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    I was under the impression that any shoe without laces is considered a loafer.

    I'm with you, though, Roger.
     
  5. Zapasman

    Zapasman Well-Known Member

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    So a lazyman model is a loafer too?.
     
  6. tifosi

    tifosi Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure what you are referring to, sorry.
     
  7. Sammy - Ascot

    Sammy - Ascot Well-Known Member

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    Agree with @striker – if the top strap has the elastic component then it’s much easier to slip on/off.
    Vass do not offer this on their DM.


    Then again, we come across many clients who do not buckle the top straps (or any straps) as
    A trending or fashion statement when wearing DM’s
     
  8. Holy Man

    Holy Man Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately (or fortunately), I am not looking to make a bold fashion statement. [​IMG]

    The consensus so far seems to be that the double monks fall closer on the "business" side of business casual while the Norwegers fall on the "casual" side of the spectrum.

    Also, if I were to wear the double monks with both straps buckled, that it would not be easier to slip off, compared to a penny loafer.

    Correct on both counts?

    If so, would the DMs look incongruent with denim?

    And, would the Norwegers look incongruent with a pair of wool trousers?
     
  9. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Well-Known Member

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    Strictly speaking a side-elastic shoe is not a loafer. The traditional name (although hardly ever used these days) is a "Cambridge shoe".

    A loafer has no facility to open-up the shoe to make entry easier. Therefore a loafer is cut much lower and covers less of the foot than a shoe that can be opened (either by laces, elastics, straps and buckles, buttons or zips) to facilitate entry.

    Hence a side-elastic as well as it's close relative the "elastic on instep" will be made on a shoe- and not a dedicated loafer last (sometimes elastic on instep can be cut quite low, so they might be classified as a loafer).
     
    4 people like this.
  10. hazwanazani

    hazwanazani Well-Known Member

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  11. Shouldaville

    Shouldaville Well-Known Member

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    The NMWA Norweger is not the typical "original / old" Peter last design on double leather. With the F last and tapering sole, it can easily be worn with wool trousers. It would be my pick.
     
  12. hazwanazani

    hazwanazani Well-Known Member

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    For the norwegers you posted, only if it's worsted/gabardine/fresco wool. Flannel and tweed would be fine.
     
  13. justinkapur

    justinkapur Well-Known Member

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    I disagree. I just read through the discussion but the norwegers would be a perfect shoe from a sportcoat and odd trouser look all the way to denim. I don't see them being worn with a suit unless one that isnt worsted (cotton, flannel, tweed, etc)

    I have a pair on order from Sammy that are pebble dark brown and plan on wearing them with my sport coat and trouser combos.
     
  14. gdl203

    gdl203 Well-Known Member

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    This discussion has been good for the sales of Norwegers - been flying out the shelves over the last few days! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2015
  15. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Well-Known Member

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    Suit - no
    Jeans or trousers/odd jacket - fine
     
  16. Holy Man

    Holy Man Well-Known Member

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    @gdl203 I'm hoping to take 1 more off your shelf! I sent an email about sizing a few days ago.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2015
  17. hazwanazani

    hazwanazani Well-Known Member

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    Yes, in that sense I agree with you. The formality of a sport coat and a pair of odd trousers are below that of a suit and so would make the norweger appropriate.

    I was specifying that for a light tan scotch grain with substantial stitching on the upper (not the smart, fine reverse stitching on dressier versions). It may work with wool trousers but definitely won't be as versatile compared to a darker shade of brown.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by @justinkapur View Post


    I disagree. I just read through the discussion but the norwegers would be a perfect shoe from a sportcoat and odd trouser look all the way to denim. I don't see them being worn with a suit unless one that isnt worsted (cotton, flannel, tweed, etc)

    I have a pair on order from Sammy that are pebble dark brown and plan on wearing them with my sport coat and trouser combos.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2015
  18. Zapasman

    Zapasman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for clarifications. Good to know.

    Was N. Tuczec who original designed the "Cambridge Shoe"?
     
  19. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Well-Known Member

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    I presume the elasticated shoe pre-dates the firm of Tuczek.

    The elasticated boot (which became as “Chelsea boot” very popular in the 1960s) was invented in the 1840s by J Sparkes Hall of Regent Street London:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Presumably some bright thing came up with an elasticated shoe not long after.

    In the States the elasticated style was known a “Congress”. A few years back, DW did post an advertisement from the early 1900s, showing a Congress style in a boot and shoe version.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    John Lobb (London) calls the exposed elastic (not covered by strips of leather) “Tuczek style”

    http://www.johnlobbltd.co.uk/catalo...edshoes/Elasticsidesplain/elastic_plain_3.htm
     
    1 person likes this.
  20. laufer

    laufer Well-Known Member

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    I wholeheartedly agree with description of the elastic/congress/chelsea boots. My pair of Burnham and I have another chelsea boot from Church are most comfortable footwear I have.
     

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