The Ultimate Vass (Footwear) Thread (Pictures, reviews, sizing, etc...)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by luk-cha, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. luk-cha

    luk-cha Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Looks great, furo.


    - B


    +1 awesome color!!!
     
  2. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    Ok, a lot of strong words here. About shoes. This could never hapen in real life.

    I think, fritzl is sometimes misunderstood (deliberately). He does not "hate" all shoes which are made by non-austro-hungarian makers. He is simply trying to point out that any discussion about "value for money" etc. we are leading here is useless without saying that there is almost no place left but Vienna/Budapest where you can buy a shoe that hasn't seen any machine in its whole genesis. Fuuma et al. might think slightly different about fancy sole finish and tapered schnickschnack had they ever seen a passionate one-person shoemaking business in real life. I mean, we can discuss oh-so beautiful EG, G&G and Sutor shoes ad infnitium -- at the end of the day, they are all nothing more but generic. Anyone willing to spend the money can buy them. Of course, he is buying shoes then that are much more precious and solid than 99% of the population but he still has bought a mass market-oriented product.

    And FWIW: So far, fritzl is not really selling shoes, he is proxying undelivered bespoke orders largely without profit. His interest in shoemaking is by no means a commercial one. So I've got to learn in various discussions with him in the last half of a year.

    Now, back to those Vass shoes!


    I'm completely pro fritzl and Sterling Gillette. These two are just the faintest voices in English that have some familiarity with shoemaking as it was and is still practiced in middle Europe. The vagaries of WWII destroyed shoemaking in Atlantic Europe and the rest of the Continent in different ways, but a bubble of the old methods lives on in some of the footprint of the old Empire.

    There is no reason to take affront at learning the truth about your pretty Northampton, French, Italian...or dare I say...Massachusetts shoes. But enjoy them for what they are...at their best, they are styled great and use impressive materials in the visible areas, but they still have elements of mass production that can lead to selection of inferior materials or methods in the parts of the shoe that you do not see.

    Mass produced shoemaking reached its height in America (as one might expect) with a concentration on fit that I do not think was rivaled elsewhere. That also died with WWII. In the 1920s and 1930s, you could have walked into a major department store in most American cities and be served by shoe salesmen who could not only fit you well, but had at their disposal a myriad of heal, forefoot, and length sizes.

    A vestige of this hybrid RTW lasting system lives in on Alden's nominal sizing, but only a narrow set of possiblities from these hybrid lasts are produced today RTW.

    - B
     
  3. teddieriley

    teddieriley Senior member

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    Wait, you smell that?
    I'm completely pro fritzl and Sterling Gillette. These two are just the faintest voices in English that have some familiarity with shoemaking as it was and is still practiced in middle Europe. The vagaries of WWII destroyed shoemaking in Atlantic Europe and the rest of the Continent in different ways, but a bubble of the old methods lives on in some of the footprint of the old Empire.

    There is no reason to take affront at learning the truth about your pretty Northampton, French, Italian...or dare I say...Massachusetts shoes. But enjoy them for what they are...at their best, they are styled great and use impressive materials in the visible areas, but they still have elements of mass production that can lead to selection of inferior materials or methods in the parts of the shoe that you do not see.

    Mass produced shoemaking reached its height in America (as one might expect) with a concentration on fit that I do not think was rivaled elsewhere. That also died with WWII. In the 1920s and 1930s, you could have walked into a major department store in most American cities and be served by shoe salesmen who could not only fit you well, but had at their disposal a myriad of heal, forefoot, and length sizes.

    A vestige of this hybrid RTW lasting system lives in on Alden's nominal sizing, but only a narrow set of possiblities from these hybrid lasts are produced today RTW.

    - B



    Fortunately nothing you have said applies to my Kenneth Cole moc toe loafers.
     
  4. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    Fortunately nothing you have said applies to my Kenneth Cole moc toe loafers.

    It's a Kwanzchrismannukah miracle.


    - B
     
  5. Imperator

    Imperator Senior member

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    It's not the content of the message (the basic truth of which I fully accept) so much as it's the tone of the remonstrations, repeated ad nauseum in other posters' threads, about the evils of mass-produced shoes. It's gratuitous. Plus, it's finals time and I have a short fuse.
    I'm completely pro fritzl and Sterling Gillette. These two are just the faintest voices in English that have some familiarity with shoemaking as it was and is still practiced in middle Europe. The vagaries of WWII destroyed shoemaking in Atlantic Europe and the rest of the Continent in different ways, but a bubble of the old methods lives on in some of the footprint of the old Empire. There is no reason to take affront at learning the truth about your pretty Northampton, French, Italian...or dare I say...Massachusetts shoes. But enjoy them for what they are...at their best, they are styled great and use impressive materials in the visible areas, but they still have elements of mass production that can lead to selection of inferior materials or methods in the parts of the shoe that you do not see. Mass produced shoemaking reached its height in America (as one might expect) with a concentration on fit that I do not think was rivaled elsewhere. That also died with WWII. In the 1920s and 1930s, you could have walked into a major department store in most American cities and be served by shoe salesmen who could not only fit you well, but had at their disposal a myriad of heal, forefoot, and length sizes. A vestige of this hybrid RTW lasting system lives in on Alden's nominal sizing, but only a narrow set of possiblities from these hybrid lasts are produced today RTW. - B
     
  6. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    Plus, it's finals time and I have a short fuse.

    First, good luck.

    Second, this is a Vass thread, so this is the shoe thread in which F's and SG's stein lids will clatter least.


    - B
     
  7. Imperator

    Imperator Senior member

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    First, good luck.

    Second, this is a Vass thread, so this is the shoe thread in which F's and SG's stein lids will clatter least.


    - B


    Thanks. And that's fair. I'll let it go. Both SG and F add a lot to the board (more than I do, certainly).
     
  8. AlanC

    AlanC Minister of Trad

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    There is no reason to take affront at learning the truth about your pretty Northampton, French, Italian...or dare I say...Massachusetts shoes. But enjoy them for what they are...at their best, they are styled great and use impressive materials in the visible areas, but they still have elements of mass production that can lead to selection of inferior materials or methods in the parts of the shoe that you do not see.

    I understand they're really no better than Walmart shoes.
     
  9. mr monty

    mr monty Senior member

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    For those that own or tried on Vass in the U-last and the New Peter last.

    Do you wear the same size in U-last as in the New Peter last?

    thanks,
     
  10. pkincy

    pkincy Senior member

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  11. ThinkDerm

    ThinkDerm Senior member

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    furo - you owe me for telling you to get those - i knew they would fit!
     
  12. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    I'm completely pro fritzl and Sterling Gillette. These two are just the faintest voices in English that have some familiarity with shoemaking as it was and is still practiced in middle Europe. The vagaries of WWII destroyed shoemaking in Atlantic Europe and the rest of the Continent in different ways, but a bubble of the old methods lives on in some of the footprint of the old Empire.

    There is no reason to take affront at learning the truth about your pretty Northampton, French, Italian...or dare I say...Massachusetts shoes. But enjoy them for what they are...at their best, they are styled great and use impressive materials in the visible areas, but they still have elements of mass production that can lead to selection of inferior materials or methods in the parts of the shoe that you do not see.

    Mass produced shoemaking reached its height in America (as one might expect) with a concentration on fit that I do not think was rivaled elsewhere. That also died with WWII. In the 1920s and 1930s, you could have walked into a major department store in most American cities and be served by shoe salesmen who could not only fit you well, but had at their disposal a myriad of heal, forefoot, and length sizes.

    A vestige of this hybrid RTW lasting system lives in on Alden's nominal sizing, but only a narrow set of possiblities from these hybrid lasts are produced today RTW.

    - B


    just great, thanks Bill

    yes, I love vass [​IMG]
     
  13. kolecho

    kolecho Senior member

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    Me too, Fritzl.
     
  14. Pezzaturra

    Pezzaturra Senior member

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    Well I am so, so on VASS. Ehhhh not so much. M-m-m I still buy them but their quality is slipping and calfskin they use is blah and don't get me started on their colors. Cognac my ass ;muddy bordeaux does not make cognac color.
    Plus the way that F-last on double sole upturns its toebox (a-la clown shoes) is awful.
     
  15. furo

    furo Senior member

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    furo - you owe me for telling you to get those - i knew they would fit!

    Yeah you were definitely right. They fit like gloves [​IMG]
     

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