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The Ultimate "HARDCORE" Shoe Porn Thread (Bespoke only)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by luk-cha, Jul 3, 2010.

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  1. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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    That would be about my limit too, and it would have to be a very friendly donkey. Luckily there's no deeply hidden social ettiquette for footwear involved, I can avoid the unspeakable horror of providing the wrong boots and making a laughing stock of my poor customer!
     
  2. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I want a leather onezie.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Riding boots. JL Paris, JL St. James

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  4. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Very interesting. Maybe I will wear one riding my bicycle someday.
     
  5. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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    If, like me, you cycle for sport, then that sort of thing would spell a day sat at the front, in the wind, doing all the work.
     
  6. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Thankfully i cycle for commute and groceries.
     
  7. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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    That's wise, it's a slightly ridiculous hobby that you can spend a reasonable sized fortune on, in ways that only similarly enthusiastic people can properly appreciate. .
     
  8. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Just like shoes?!? :hide: :hide: :hide:
     
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  9. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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  10. j ingevaldsson

    j ingevaldsson Senior member

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    I spent last week at Swedish bespoke maker Janne Melkersson (he was active here on SF a couple of years ago, probably known for some of you) for a one week course in shoemaking. You get to follow his work on a pair of shoes for you, and also try some of the steps (he got a two weeks course too, where you make two pairs, and do more yourself the second week). His courses are a bit special from many other shoemaking courses, you are alone, and you follow and get to learn the whole process from measuring, lastmaking, pattern making, clicking, upper making, lasting, making and finishing. You get to keep the lasts that you make, and are allowed to copy all of his patterns, you can order his lasts in other sizes from a lastmaker in Sweden etc, so many start making their own shoes just a few weeks after they've visited him. I visited mostly to see how it's done, not to really learn doing it, and it was very interesting and knowledgeable. Also interesting to try doing some of the steps. It's a pretty tight schedule to do a pair of shoes in five days, so he doesn't have time for his most refined work, but the shoes turned out really great I think. We made them in Saint Crispin Babycalf, interesting leather especially how it comes alive when burnishing it, really smooth to touch, but also pretty fragile and hard to work with.

    Here's a bunch of pics, first some of the process making them:

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    And here's some of the final pair:

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    For those interested to see and read more I've made two long blog posts about the process on my blog, here's part 1 and part 2. You can translate it using the translation tool on the blog to make it understandable.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
    13 people like this.
  11. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Nice shoes..............but, by golly, it must have been cold up north!

    I'm shivering by just looking at the pictures :)
     
  12. Zapasman

    Zapasman Senior member

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    Fantastic shoes and fantastic article J.i!!. I am a little bit cold too.
     
  13. RogerP

    RogerP Senior member

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    Most excellent J! The shoes look terrific and I look forward to reading the article when I am at my computer. No doubt you learned a tremendous amount about the craft and I look forward to this enhancement of your typically excellent forum contributions going forward.
     
  14. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Your shoes turned out beautifully. It was like being in my own shop...albeit much upgraded (new machines and new wood benches) and much more organized.

    I skimmed through the blog--the translator leaves a lot to be desired--and enjoyed it immensely.

    I have one question...did Janne explain the reason for welting all the way to the heel and then pegging the waist? Or did you stitch the waist and then also peg?

    Also...just out of curiosity, what brand of neutral polish did you use to burnish the Baby Calf? They sure looked good.

    And thank you for taking the time to photograph and document your time with Janne.

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    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
  15. NewYawker

    NewYawker Senior member

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    For those interested to see and read more I've made two log blog posts about the process on my blog, here's part 1 and part 2. You can translate it using the translation tool on the blog to make it understandable.
    Wow really cool. Thanks for posting.
     
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  16. j ingevaldsson

    j ingevaldsson Senior member

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    Thank you very much guys! Haha yeah it was a bit chilly, I can tell you that.


    Cheers Roger!


    Thank you DW! He had just moved to this new house, not sure how tidy it is once he has been settled [​IMG]

    No Janne didn't talk about that specifically, and I thought it's the ususal way to do it. He did not stitch the sole at the waist, just peg it. I think Bestetti does it the same, don't have his shoes where I'm now, but you can see in this picture:

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    Is the normal thing to stop the welt before the waist?

    Don't remember what the name of the cream was, haven't heard the name before and Janne didn't remember where he got it from. It was some old stuff I found among Jannes pile of jars, the only neutral cream he had. But it did work really good for the burnishing!

    Cheers!
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
  17. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Yeah, I remember when my shop was neat and clean...Actually I do clean it up and make it spic and span when I have visitors or students coming. But All his machinery looks new too. and the handles of his tools don't have that patina of pitch and wax on them that mine do.

    I don't know what "normal" means in that context...I've been pegging waists for a long time and I always end the welt at the top of the waist.

    That said, if welting to the heelseat is the way Janne usually does it, it's normal for him.

    I don't think there's anything wrong with doing it that way...I just don't know what the welt is adding.

    If the welt is ended before the waist, when the ousole is mounted it may be trimmed closer to the upper and thinned to look like a beveled waist...as in the Bestetti photo. I can't tell if Bestetti ended the welt at the waist (I'm inclined to think he did) but it is possible to make a beveled waist that is trimmed exceedingly close to the upper and half as thick as the forepart--I think the contrast of thicknesses looks good.

    The jar almost...but not quite...looks like Glenkaren neutral but the contents are a little too yellow for Glen's product.

    --

    edited for grammar, punctuation and clarity.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
  18. j ingevaldsson

    j ingevaldsson Senior member

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    The sewing machine and grinding table were both pretty new, at least for him. Most of the tools had been with him for a long time though.

    Normal and normal, maybe more common is a better expression here. Will ask him next time I talk to him 'bout why he does it that way.

    No it wasn't Glenkaren, this was much softer in consistency than Glen's stuff.
     
  19. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    The bell skiver and the shoe press (wish I had one) looked fairly new to me also. It's all relative...lots of the equipment I have is 1930's or earlier. Same with my hand tools--I suspect all of the handles started out that pristine blond colour but most are black with age and pitch now.
     
  20. janne melkersson

    janne melkersson Senior member

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    I hope you guys don't mind me jumping in here!

    DW, thanks for compliments. It was nice to have Jesper in shop.Not often a student has so much forknowledge. He taught me some too :)

    The reason why I choose sewing the welt down to heel breast and then peg instead of sewing the waist is becaue I prefer the look of a peged waist. But I also like the look of a bevel waist that is full and for that the welt is needed. You can come close to the upper either way.
    The wax is called "Shoe Wax" by Fibertec http://www.fibertec-waterproofing.de/shoe-wax.ht

    Janne Melkersson
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
    5 people like this.

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