The Tailors' Thread: Fit Feedback and Alteration Suggestions

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by emptym, Sep 14, 2011.

  1. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Despos, any more thoughts on the dreaded bow-leggedness? I've had small children ride their bicycles through my legs, without them even touching the fabric. Growing up, I was known as Bandy-legged Lear. Any more tips would be appreciated.

    Lear
     


  2. Iago

    Iago New Member

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    Just received my first online MTM suit--as the nature of these things there appear to be a few tweaks required.

    To my eye the sleeves should come up (made too long) and there is some wrinkling/folding on my upper back beneath my neck. Also the front chest region between the lapels and the arm-pit is weird to me as if there is too much fabric there but I'm not sure how exactly that could be fixed. Pulling in at the darts there? Other suggestions are definitely welcome.

    Front
    [​IMG]

    Back
    [​IMG]

    3/4 View
    [​IMG]
     


  3. ianGP

    ianGP Senior member

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    I lol'd
    I've got slight bow-leggedness too and it is accentuated with slim trous. I've just gone 1/2 -3/4 in. wider and it looks better. I'm also curious on other thoughts
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2012


  4. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Thank you, appreciate your comment.
     


  5. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    There is an adjustment made to the trouser pattern for bow legged. When the trouser is finished you can improve the line on the leg by shifting the inseam and outseam.

    ( ) is the shape of bow legs. The outside/outseam of the curve is longer and the inside/inseam curve of the leg shorter. The trouser leg has a notch at the knee on the inseam and the outseam. On a finished trouser you open the inseam and shift the front part up so the knee notch on the front is above the notch on the back part. Open the out seam and drop the front leg down at the knee notch so the notch on the front part is below the notch of the back part.
    The visual from a front view is you are turning the front leg panel down on the out seam and upwards on the inseam. The outseam gets longer and the inseam gets shorter in relation to each other. This makes the inseam hang straighter and gives length to the outseam to help it follow the curve of your leg.
    There is more to it but this is enough to explain the concept.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2012


  6. a tailor

    a tailor Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    if your style is more fashion fore ward, or you have short legs then just enough to cover the butt is enough.
    if you are more conservative or you are long legged then at least an inch or more longer than that.
     


  7. Layered Player

    Layered Player Senior member

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    How about doing the opposite and shortening a Long to a Regular?

    Is it something that most tailors would be able to do?
     


  8. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Sure, easier to do. Just don't shorten it so much that the distance from the pocket and lower button to the new hem look out of proportion and make the front look out of balance. Any alterations you do shouldn't look obvious of what was done.
     


  9. Layered Player

    Layered Player Senior member

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    Good to know, thank you!
     


  10. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Despos, I also like reading your posts. Before SF, I thought tailoring was a relatively simple matter of sharpening the shears, then cutting a straight line :hide:. It's actually science, art and psychology combined + the art of letting someone know that they're fat, without ever alluding to it.

    Great stuff

    Lear
     


  11. jigz23

    jigz23 Member

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    I finally sprang for a MTM suit knowing that there would definitely be some issues on the first try. When I tried the jacket on at first, I immediately noticed some issues, especially in the back. They said if I expand the yoke, it would fix everything and I should consider getting higher armholes.
    Suggestions on what I should tell them?
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     


  12. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Looks like a cotton suit, is it? This suit jacket can be altered to fit you. the shoulders need to be squared up and reset the collar, that will correct the issues under the collar. The fronts look pretty good, the back part needs some work.
    The line from the shoulder to the waist needs to be reduced at the blades and that will clean up the back. Looks like the back is a bit long, balance wise and the jacket sits on you hips a bit. Can't see that much of the back view as the picture is cut off.

    To do it all right you would remove the sleeves, square up and remake the shoulder, shortening the back from the top at the same time and then recut the sleeve to fit the armhole to clean up the wrinkling on the back of the sleeves. If this is a cotton suit you have to allow a little messiness in the back due to the nature of cotton cloth.

    It's a good bit of work to do all this. Will they alter for you or do you have to do it on your own?
     


  13. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Agree the sleeves are too long but I can't make out any details to comment on anything else, suit looks too dark on my screen.
     


  14. jigz23

    jigz23 Member

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    They've asked me to send it back so they can fix it for me but have asked that I send another well fitting jacket along with it (which doesn't really exist for me). So I can send it back so that is great but what exactly would I have to tell them? Thanks again for your feedback
     


  15. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Verbal communication is tough because when your vocabulary meets with their understanding it may or may not work. Take more pictures, especially full length, from the front, both right and left sides, back and maybe close ups of the areas you want them to focus on. You need full length, head to toe shots to get the fit across to them in pictures. No shots only to the waist.

    If you have a tailor who understands how to alter this and he could pin things or mark the adjustments with chalk would be even better. Even from pictures they won't know the amounts to take in or how much to square the shoulders. They would be guessing. The adjustments you need are more technical and you would benefit from the person doing the work, seeing the suit on you. Maybe they would compensate you if you had a local tailor do the work or compensate you on a future order. If you have it done locally, have the tailor diagram what he did with the amounts he altered the jacket and submit new measurements form the altered jacket.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2012


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