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The SW&D Intellectual Masturbation Station

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Teger, May 14, 2012.

  1. KingJulien

    KingJulien Senior member

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    I have this though it was stronger when I was younger, now it's more like color associations. It helps me remember things sometimes. 'That person's name was red.'

    I thought everyone's brain worked like this until I took a state testing exam in 8th grade and one of the essays was about synesthesia.
     
  2. KingJulien

    KingJulien Senior member

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    Ugh that book is awful, I don't really mind books that aren't terribly intellectual but this one tries to be metaphorical and deep with the subtlety of a sledgehammer.
     
  3. chion

    chion Member

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    That's Danielewski, right? I've seen another book of his which you have to flip around (as in the whole book) every page to read, even called it only revolutions... A girl in one of my literature classes went on and on about it [​IMG]
     
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  4. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Senior member

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    whoops wrong thread.

    Has anyone read road to perdido?
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2012
  5. wogbog

    wogbog Senior member

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    I skimmed a bit of House of Leaves at the library. Seemed gimmicky.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2012
  6. skrz

    skrz Senior member

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    house of leaves is different from only revolutions. mind you, i read both of these in high school so its been awhile, but i think its a fun satire of academic writing. i suppose i always thought of danielewski's work as fucking with people moreso than any sort of serious intellectual thought. i've recommended it to a lot of friends who aren't really "philosophy types" and they've enjoyed it.

    here's a pretty good review: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2000/jul/15/fiction.reviews

    i guess it could be called gimmicky - i guess i just like the way he plays with text/footnotes/references though.
     
  7. CharlieAngel

    CharlieAngel Senior member

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    Existence well what does it matter?
    I exist on the best terms I can.
    The past is now part of my future,
    The present is well out of hand.
     
  8. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Senior member

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    House of Leaves isn't just a single book of course... there are other connected texts and even music. It's altogether too clever for its own good, but fun all the same. A colleague of mine has written extensively on it, as well as other contemporary slipstream fictions like Steven Hall's The Raw Shark Texts, which makes House of Leaves look relatively simple.

    Talking of slipstream, I very much recommend Christopher Priest's recent novel, The Islanders, which revisits the territory of his earlier work, The Dream Archipelago.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2012
  9. GG Allin

    GG Allin Senior member

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    I think this post pretty much killed this thread, which is why I'm thankful for it.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. KingJulien

    KingJulien Senior member

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    House of Leaves is kinda fun to read, I guess, but it's gimmicky and poorly written. The problem is that if you take it as just a novel, the writing sucks (why is the main character having teenage fantasy threesomes with hot women in every chapter?), and if you take it as satire of academic work, it misses the mark. You could have done the same satire with a 20 page work, yet there's about 700 pages of fake footnotes that don't really contribute anything further to the 'satire.' If you take it as some sort of creative way to arrange a novel, it hits you in the face with it and is about as clever as one of those 'choose your own adventure' books.

    It appeals to and I think was targeted at high schoolers, so I don't really mind the book itself, just when people older than that try to tout it as some sort of literary achievement. That review that was posted actually did a pretty good job with it.
     
  11. thewho13

    thewho13 Senior member

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    Maybe this thread could use a (brief?) revival? Rft has seen its fair share of non-fashion-related discussion lately...


    In any case, can anyone tell me if they've had experience reading Harold Bloom? Or, more precisely, would anyone enthusiastically recommend (or recommend against) reading The Anxiety of Influence?
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  12. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    I've never read Anxiety, but I've read some other Bloom stuff. I read The Best Poems of the English Language during that two-year poetry immersion I mentioned and I've read a chunk of Hamlet, Poem Unlimited, plus random tidbits here and there. Honestly, I find Bloom really obnoxious. I get the impression a lot of the time that he's more interested in talking than communicating, if that makes sense. He tends to make these grandiose, cryptic statements (see any time he talks about Hart Crane or Walt Whitman, even more so talking about Hamlet). You should go sit in a Barnes&Noble and read the beginning of it and see if you're into it.
     
  13. Auburn

    Auburn Senior member

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    I'd simply watch some youtube interviews of him. Bloom is certainly a genius, if one can say that about a critic, however, his views do tend to be polarizing in that they seem rooted in a kind of traditionalism that one either accepts or rejects. That being said I've never read an entire book of his, just various forwards, commentaries and critiques. On Proust for example he is untouchable.
     
  14. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

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    His canon list is a life-saver. Or a time-saver, take your pick.
     
  15. thewho13

    thewho13 Senior member

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    Thanks for the input. I don't know if I'll be able to start reading his stuff anytime soon, but what you've mentioned (kinda obnoxious, brilliant, polarizing) sounds like what my friends have, at one point or another, tried to tell me. Maybe I'll have time to read him in the fall; but for now I've got other things to do, which, by the way, reminds me of another question:

    Wtf is going on in Deleuze and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus? I haven't read Freud or Marx's original texts (only secondary stuff, like Lacan, Zupancic, Zizek, Derrida, etc.), but it feels like what they are writing is wholly beyond the scope of rational thought. I just... I have no idea what they mean to say when they say: "Judge Schreber has sunbeams in his ass. A solar anus." Or: "The process as process of production extends into the method as method of inscription."

    And terms like the "body without organs?" Fuck me...
     
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  16. KingJulien

    KingJulien Senior member

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    1 person likes this.
  17. Cacatfish

    Cacatfish Senior member

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    As a primer for Heidegger, you can read some of Walter Kauffman (or is it Kaufmann?) where he generally tears Heidegger to shreds but gives some starting points about his positions.
     
  18. toothsomesound

    toothsomesound Senior member

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    Read a good amount of Nietzsche, will make Heidegger make a little more sense.
     
  19. phantasm

    phantasm Member

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    Check out Being-In-The-World by Hubert Dreyfus. He provides the context which makes Heidegger understandable. Once you understand what Heidegger is attempting to do, the tradition in which he is doing it, and his ridiculous coinages and obscure uses of existing language, Being In Time becomes remarkably clear, though still maybe tedious.

    There are also plenty of free web resources which are helpful. Two lecture series, by Dreyfus, on Being and Time are available for free. Dreyfus also did an interview with Brian Mcgee on the subject of Husserlian and Heideggerian phenomenology. The Partially Examined Life did a fun podcast on Heidegger which is also pretty good.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2012
  20. Cacatfish

    Cacatfish Senior member

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    Or just read Neitzsche instead. After him, Heidegger will probably seem overly wordy and kinda boring.
     

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