The StyleForum Runway & High Fashion Thread

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by KingJulien, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    I like the bottoms in both pics actually, but the tops, particularly in the bottom row, are still problematic for me. I will admit that the presentation does help a lot. By that I mean the lighting, the background, the resolution, and as much as I hate to admit it, the model (but with the model it's not really that she's younger and prettier, but more her attitude, her hair, and her whole image). All that does create a sense of fantasy that seems missing from the first pic I posted. It makes you want to buy into that fantasy, as good advertising always does.

    Regarding the other convo, I've noticed that, as I get older and become more comfortable with myself, I'm less likely to worry about what's "weird," and what I consider "weird" has changed. I'm just more comfortable wearing what I like.
     
  2. the shah

    the shah Persian Bro #2 and enabler-in-chief

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    this is my point. it's not weird because i am comfortable and impart that to people who see me. i don't do something because of it's potential to be perceived as odd or different or standing out, to me that's just a superficiality just like the emo kids etc etc.
    "evocative universe" versus "individual pieces" , to quote someone here; whether "the pieces may reference things that a casual observer will find congruent" (eg. militaria, nomadic, executive) is not important.
    i don't know if i care about congruence as perceived by someone more knowledgeable, either. i mean i mix pretty disparate things often.
    my ultimate objective is the assemblage of agreeable color palettes <-- in this sense i am constrained by societal norms but then again even savages can distinguish between smooth transitions and psychedelic tie-die madness
     
  3. KingJulien

    KingJulien Senior member

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    I get a lot of comments if I wear anything that isn't jeans + a flannel or t-shirt (i.e. a sweater or blazer), which is sort of annoying. Not that I really care.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  4. Ivwri

    Ivwri Senior member

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    On my end I lack a lot of knowledge with regards to fashion in general as I am really only interested in a few designers. I am also not that interested in designers making larger intellectual points with their collections - for example Geoffrey B Small and his various collections - preferring designers like Yohji, Aitor or Sruli Recht who are coming at the clothing from a more abstract place based more on cool and new references, new or underused silhouettes and ideas of the relationship between clothing and the human body, clothing and the passage of time etc. and how all this stuff relates to my own view of the world.

    I do enjoy the discussion that can arise from stuff like Comme collections, but that is really not what I look for when I think of fashion and what interests me about it. To answer your question though I don't really expect that stuff from menswear collections generally so I tend to ignore most of them unless my attention is brought to a particular designer by one of the guys on here.
     
  5. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Presentation is essential imo, especially if a designer is trying to create a narrative or conceptual theme. The clothes alone can only say so much on their own. Great photography, styling, make-up, casting, art direction, ad campaign, runway setting, music, etc will all enhance a designer's ideas. Even a collection with no, or very little, concept can be made to look more substantial with a good presentation or campaign. Or conversely, a designer can have strong conceptual ideas, but if the documentation and presentation of those clothes fall short, the message could fall flat.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  6. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    Haha. Is it unusual to wear a sweater where you live? I think that's weird.

    Edit:

    Of course you think this. You're a graphic designer! Just kidding. The point you make is kinda undeniable. I agree that a fashion brand isn't just about clothing, as various people have said. In that Siki Im interview on the SF blog, Siki talked about why he admired Helmut Lang, and it went beyond the clothes to the advertising and whole brand concept (say what you will about wanting to separate fashion from commerce, but ads are one of the major ways brands communicate their point of view). And of course this extends to the stores where the stuff is sold (think of Margiela's stores, for instance) and a whole bunch of other things that aren't just the clothes.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  7. KingJulien

    KingJulien Senior member

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    Lol, depends. Cotton or nondescript crewneck/vneck things slide by, but a cardigan or fluffy schneider sweater, kinda. Also depends where you are.
     
  8. sipang

    sipang Senior member

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    Parker gets it !

    That's actually more or less what I was referring too when I said that fashion was more than the garments alone, I wasn't really trying to make a point about the need for some deeper meaning to be uncovered or understood, I can very much identify with Ivwri's last post too (although I don't clearly see how the Comme discussion isn't related to the clothing-body relationship). I just think that if this thread is about high-fashion then it should also be the place to talk about all the things that Parker mentionned.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  9. A Fellow Linguist

    A Fellow Linguist Senior member

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    Do any of you guys subscribe to fashion magazines? sometimes I'll read i-D or AnOther and barnes and noble for a laff, but they're pretty expensive and don't seem worth it imo. Anything good out there?
     
  10. snowmanxl

    snowmanxl Senior member

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    i like dapper dan but i dont subscribe to it
     
  11. sipang

    sipang Senior member

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    If I had to pick one , I'd probably go with Encens.

    From my limited experience, Dapper Dan seems to be the most solid as far as men's fashion magazine go, can't say I was impressed by what i've seen of Fantastic Man, Man About Town etc (re: editorials etc, can't speak to the written content much).


    For general fashion content, i-D, Dazed and Confused and some others (depending on what you're looking for).


    If you've got cash to burn, Nomenus Quarterly or Visionaire
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  12. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    Dapper Dan is good but it comes out so infrequently I forget it exists
     
  13. Urthwhyte

    Urthwhyte Senior member

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    There is something to be said for appreciating garments but not wanting to wear them yourself; some things plain don't work if you're not a 195cm tall waif, or lose much of their appeal. Imagine anything from DH on Moo.

    Weird is very contextual. I'm still in university, and being on campus it's fun to see that context change rapidly; an outfit that is well-received in the places art and theatre students hang out has elicited questions when I went to speak with my math professor. It's very interesting how you get to see microcosms of each profession

    If you're comfortable in what you wear it really is obvious and makes a difference. Don't think knowledgeable people really care about congruence either. When I see pics of someone in head-to-toe Julius or Balenciaga or what have you I usually think "Adult Grranimals" before "good matching". Usually an outfit from a diverse set of brands is much more interesting visually than a look picked off the runway.
    I'm surprised anyone in Boston gives a damn or even notices. IME everyone sticks to themselves and doesn't comment


    An interest in a few designers is all I can really sustain as well, with everything else just being general knowledge I've read somewhere. I will go through every single show every season just so I've an idea of who's doing what, but as far as history and an in-depth following goes my interests are rather narrow. I am still in the phase where I've not realised what I want my silhouette and palette to look like day-to-day, and most of my time is spent trying to work that out. Conceptual designers don't appeal to me in the least, and it's one of the main reasons I don't appreciate CCP or PH. Seems it's trying far too hard to be art/have a contrived gimmick.
    Presentation definitely plays into it and is as integral a part of the whole part and parcel; when I was talking about a divorce from consumerism what I meant was more along the lines of personal consumption. I.e, I've no interest in purchasing Comme but enjoy the brand for reasons other than that. I think TB is a good example of the clothes being less than the brand. His shows, with all their crazy costumes and accoutrements very much ignite an interest in what are otherwise fairly staid, boring designs.
     
  14. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    Just wondering: how important is it to you guys that a designer do something "new," and who is currently doing menswear that you would say fits the description? One criticism that gets thrown around a lot is that someone's work is derivative, but I generally find that to be a lazy criticism. People use it to discount a designer's work wholesale without really examining the work on its own terms, not to mention that the "original" was undoubtedly deriving influence from elsewhere.
     
  15. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    I don't think it has to be new, but for me it has to have a perspective of it's own. At least in terms of what I appreciate; what I buy is kinda a little seperated from that.


    If there's a trend that I quite like, I won't mind buying derivative pieces if they are done well. Often they expand an idea and make it more precise.
     

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