The StyleForum Runway & High Fashion Thread

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by KingJulien, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. the shah

    the shah Persian Bro #2 and enabler-in-chief

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    those damn hypnotic eyes are spreading like a virus. i went for a haircut and all the woman could do was stare back at my feet's eyes. i have bald patches all over my head now ......
     
  2. sipang

    sipang Senior member

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    Bald patches sound très Comme, you can make it work
     
  3. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    Will be interesting to see if the UO shoppers of the world will upgrade to high fashion when they get jobs or not, in which case menswear will continue to be the neglected child

    I toyed with the idea of getting a firstview account, but it's not cheap and I don't really know what I'd do with gigs upon gigs of photos
     
  4. cyc wid it

    cyc wid it Senior member

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    For most of my friends (25-30ish) shopping at J. Crew is a big deal already (both genders). It always confuses me to see women of all ages with Chanel bags heading into H&M, but disposable fashion seems to be much acceptable to women.
     
  5. Urthwhyte

    Urthwhyte Senior member

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    It's because the bag is instantly recognizable. Even the frattiest of bros can identify an LV or Chanel bag at this point, and the Celine Luggage and PS1 are quickly heading towards iconic status as well. Girls will scrimp and save to get an "it" bag. Disposable fashion would be a thing for guys if more guys gave a shit. J. Crew's image as "classy" and "upscale" continues to confound me.
     
  6. Ivwri

    Ivwri Senior member

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    Aitor Throup

    The thing that fascinates me a lot about him is that he manages to instill his clothing with a sense of narrative beyond just the typical historical references or political. He infuses his clothing with an actual story. I guess this taps into my love of comic books as a medium as well where costume design can be very intrinsic to a character and in informing the world around them. He has somehow managed to distill that into his work and even when you remove the more outlandish details from things like his Hooligans/Hindu gods series, his work still manages to look like it stepped out from some other universe. Like where wearing his clothes could transform you into one of those characters.

    I also really like his statement about how menswear focuses a lot on function and utility, but that function does not necessarily mean that it must serve a utilitarian purpose. A detail (like for instance the flaps of fabric evoking Ganesh's trunk) can be there because it is supposed to evoke something and in that it does have a function, albeit one related to a meta-narrative.

    Anyway,


    [​IMG]






    Airavat
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Ganesh
    [​IMG][​IMG]



    Hanuman
    [​IMG][​IMG]


    Narasimha
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Shiva
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Skanda
    [​IMG][​IMG]


    Varaha
    [​IMG][​IMG]






     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  7. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    ^Man I'm only just catching up to this stuff now but that Aitor Throup guy does some great shit.

    He just seems to have so much purpose behind the shows - sorta linked with what Sipang was saying, the stuff just seems so far removed from fashion in general, and to be honest it kinda makes alot of other collections just seem so irrelevant. (Too early to call the timelessness part)

    What was it Alexander McQueen said about menswear?
    "...I mean, I could cut you a mean jacket, but what would be the point?"


    I think this is what separates the good stuff from the Michael Bastian (nohate). It has a point.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
  8. snowmanxl

    snowmanxl Senior member

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    id love if aitor sold life size prints or one-offs of those sketches :drool:
     
  9. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    figured I'd respond to this here quickly rather than in RFT because it seems better suited to this thread


    I guess when I think of wearability I think of whether a person would actually want to wear it and how acceptable it would be to do so. Lumps and bumps isn't very wearable in this regard, but I'm actually talking about it on a more abstract aesthetic level. I'm saying it's just ugly and boring to me. The Aitor Throup Shiva suit, by contrast, is definitely not very wearable, but aesthetically I would say it's still amazing. Hope that clarifies my point a little. Also, I'm sure the way that CdG collection was presented was very cool, but then we're talking about a lot of stuff beyond the garment. The garment is what I'm interested in here. With the other stuff included we're talking about something different, more like performance art or dance or something. Here's an analogy. John Cage's 4'33 is just silence. It's not the silence that's really the focus though, it's the whole act of a "performer" sitting down at an instrument in front of an audience and not playing anything. Is 4'33 a great song? I would say definitely not. Is it an interesting piece of performance art? Some people think it is (though personally I don't care because I think it's exceedingly lazy and egotistical and not enlightening in any way). You could use the analogy with Duchamp's Fountain or Rauschenberg's White Paintings (which are probably more "installation pieces" than paintings), etc.

    Something interesting I noticed: Rei talks about herself as a businesswoman as much as an artist, if not more so since she seems hesitant to call herself an artist at times. You of course don't have to care what an artist's or designer's intentions are, but I think it's interesting that she doesn't seem to want her work considered outside the context of commerce. She's not railing against the need to sell or anything.

    EDIT: I don't want to convince anyone not to like the CdG collection, by the way. Just discussing my personal opinion. That's all. Happy to move on to the next topic. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
  10. Auburn

    Auburn Senior member

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    John Cage isn't really a good example in this case, as 4'33 was certainly about "silence", or rather the sounds that are lost because one doesn't pay attention to the environment around them, unless placed into a situation (in this case, a concert) where they are put on display.
     
  11. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    without that act of framing the piece doesn't exist. the silence isn't unique, or even a product of Cage's work. You can find silence anywhere (well, you have to look for it...)
     
  12. sipang

    sipang Senior member

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    Btw, some of Throup's sketchbook stuff is currently being posted here , didn't check thourougly though so it might be the same stuff that's already been posted previously on the official website, Dazed jp etc...





    In the end, the bolded part is what it boils down to for me, and it brings us back to my initial post in RFT and to that Urthwhyte post I quoted. For better or for worse, I don't think (high) fashion is all about the garment, not today anyway, that's just the surface, the end product.


    On a side note, I enjoy the discussion, whether you like CdG 1997 or not.
     
  13. snowmanxl

    snowmanxl Senior member

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    thanks for the link, i havent seen half of those!!
     
  14. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    That's a good point. It is in a lot of ways about a fantasy, and for many designers, a lifestyle, not to mention history, conventions, influences, etc as urthwhyte mentioned. I have very much enjoyed the discussion too and hope I haven't seemed like a jerk. :hide:

    Going back to urthwhyte's classification system, I'm probably more interested in style than fashion at the moment, whereas it seems you, shah, ivwri, urthwhyte (I'm guessing here) are more interested in fashion. You're on a higher plane :nodding: . Actually, it's not that I'm not interested in fashion, but I do still approach it from the point of view of what I personally like and would want to wear most of the time. That would probably change a bit as I learned more, but it's where I am right now. All that said, I have pretty strong feelings about art that I view as too conceptual. It can be great, but as often as not it makes me feel like I'm having an aneurysm!
     
  15. Urthwhyte

    Urthwhyte Senior member

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    I can't dress myself so I make things up about clothes instead [​IMG]

    Edit: I do really enjoy the discussion though. Dissenting opinions are more fascinating than a bunch of people all agreeing with each other, and it avoids one view becoming the only lens through which we view a particular designer.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012

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