The State of Black Tie: Your Observations

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by mafoofan, Nov 22, 2011.

Tags:
  1. Tibor

    Tibor Senior member

    Messages:
    1,191
    Likes Received:
    1,027
    Joined:
    May 13, 2009
    

    Nice Pumps, details...
     


  2. Tibor

    Tibor Senior member

    Messages:
    1,191
    Likes Received:
    1,027
    Joined:
    May 13, 2009
    Apart from state dinners and formal functions, I always viewed white-tie as a style for a night out on the town, dancing drinking, and trying to get the girl.
     


  3. GasparddeColigny

    GasparddeColigny Senior member

    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2010
    I've followed this topic with interest and I'd like to add a few observations of my own.

    The moment clothing leaves behind the mere functional it is subject to changes in fashion. This has been so for centuries, millennia even. Clothing reflects, amongst others, our culture, affiliations, aspired affiliations, class and idiosyncracies. It is naive to pick a point in time and declare 'this is authentic', at the very least it's arbitrary, at worst it's misguided. Photos posted (by I believe Despos) of fashion in the Edwardian and Victorian period show a variety and playfulness, but all within the boundaries of formalwear. These victorians were very familiar and comfortable with formal clothing and would have likely had little need for a set of rules. Modern man has lost a great deal of this formal wear 'compass' and seeks a set-in-stone set of rules as guide.
    There is no exact profile of black-tie, merely a set of (strict) guidelines that leave us with a 'sweet spot'. Where you end up in the sweet spot (notch or peak etc) depends heavily on locale, culture, tradition...dare I say it..taste!

    In regards to dressing for the occasion, the most sociable, tactful thing to do is to go with the consensus. The outfit that day should be largely guided by what the hosts request. Being the odd one out, regardless of how correct your sartorial choices may be, is just putting yourself in the spotlight.
     


  4. F. Corbera

    F. Corbera Senior member

    Messages:
    4,908
    Likes Received:
    1,153
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010


    [​IMG]
     


  5. Will

    Will Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    3,144
    Likes Received:
    36
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisco
    

    I wore black tie to Graydon Carter's party for the A&S book in Manhattan a couple weeks ago, one of only a couple men to do so, and it was very well received.
     


  6. F. Corbera

    F. Corbera Senior member

    Messages:
    4,908
    Likes Received:
    1,153
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010
    

    Did you pop out of the cake?

    :confused:
     


  7. Will

    Will Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    3,144
    Likes Received:
    36
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisco
    

    That was Reinaldo Herrera.
     


  8. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

    Messages:
    8,624
    Likes Received:
    401
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    

    Somehow, I think here in "Slovenly California" 99.99999% of all girls would regard any man who was out and about in white tie as some kind of costume weirdo. Of course, it was probably quite different 80 or 90 years ago.
     


  9. F. Corbera

    F. Corbera Senior member

    Messages:
    4,908
    Likes Received:
    1,153
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010
    

    It gives me hope that you remember your twenties.
     


  10. Butler

    Butler Senior member

    Messages:
    827
    Likes Received:
    2,060
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Location:
    CPH
    


    Thats an absolutely no no!!!

    It's an insult to the host, if a private function - and anyhow it sends a strong signal that you have no idea of how to behave a n d even worse it is " Look at me I own(?) a Tux!
    Those in the know will either ignore it politely or snicker behind the curtains:bigstar:
     


  11. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Jewfro Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,365
    Likes Received:
    4,552
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    

    I meant more for charity/opera type public events where it's plausible to think that others may wear black tie, or historically have some black tie association, not a private dinner party or something.
     


  12. apropos

    apropos Senior member

    Messages:
    4,466
    Likes Received:
    309
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Eh..... no.

    Seriously? What message are you are trying to send? Think hard about that.

    On the bright side, you may find that people might approach you without you having to do anything...

    ...to order drinks.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2011


  13. tgt465

    tgt465 Senior member

    Messages:
    379
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    

    Well, if it's northern California, 60% of the girls have a fetish for costume weirdos, while the other 40% are lesbians.
     


  14. mmkn

    mmkn Senior member

    Messages:
    1,442
    Likes Received:
    30
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2007
    

    ^ This and FC.'s "It's not about being self-centered but a centered-self" tome on formal dress sum it up nicely!

    - M
     


  15. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

    Messages:
    9,833
    Likes Received:
    953
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2002
    Location:
    Washington, D.C.
    

    I'm guessing that you're referring to gala events that benefit charities or arts organizations. A tuxedo is perfectly acceptable. This being DC, the vast majority of men will look like they came directly from the office. Nothing wrong with exceeding that very low bar. If you're worried about being overdressed or mistaken for the help, you can break up the uniform by substituting a velvet jacket, blackwatch pants, or funny bow tie.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by