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the sign, the tag

aul

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Is it rude to ask an artisan to take off his/her signature tag from the work?

Even movie credits make me cringe-- I hate logos on artworks, custom made

clothings and such because it throws things off balance; say, with a Nike

sneaker, the bigger the swoosh, the greater the appeal. But I just don't think

a corporate aesthetic goes with bespoke goods. What do you think?
 

rach2jlc

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What exactly do you mean? I find that most custom-made or superlative items generally have the LEAST branding. For shoes and such, often small and handwritten on the inside. Or suits, sometimes not even that much. It seems to me that "corporate" and "bespoke" don't belong in the same sentence. "Corporate" and "Armani"... sure. But "corporate" and "Huntsman?" I don't know...

But, if you don't want them to put anything at all, why would they mind? Any tags would be on the inside. And, people who know a bespoke suit know it without having you open up your jacket and show them a label.

Besides, I'd say that they'd be more concerned with a tag that told the particular fabric or something (for reference) than whether or not their name was in it. They, too, can probably tell at first glance from the cut, etc.

If you are talking about non-suit bespoke goods like bags and such, it's the same. High-end companies that do bespoke work (even famous brands like Hermes or Valextra) still have VERY little branding.

I'm still not sure if I'm addressing your question... but I still don't get exactly what you mean.
 

aul

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I was talking about even the very least branding. I guess I put

it quite abstractly though, because it is true that Hermes bags have tiny

ones that don't even really show. But isn't it more tasteful to not even

have that? The same goes for ones that don't show (i.e. suit, tie). As

I wrote earlier, I understand why factory-made products have logos. It's

part of the marketing game. My main question is concerning bespoke, artisan-

made products. Everyone takes it for granted, but why sow in a name (even

if it isn't visible?) for something you know is made for you, and is, if

correctly-made, obviously prestigious? It seems to me like unbuttoning

the jacket-sleeve.
 

Holdfast

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My bespoke jackets have only a very discreet maker's label sown on the inside of the inside pocket. I think this is common practice.

You would never see it unless someone opened the jacket and then turned the pocket inside-out. That's discreet enough for me!
 

mack11211

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There are degrees of obviousness, tag or no.

Labeling that is seen only by the wearer may convey the prider of the wearer, or the pride of the maker, or both.

Even the garment without any label may be recognizeable due to its cut or some styling detail. For example, Perry Ellis shirts have a tiny fold in the sleeve fabric at the top of the shoulder seam. Other, more elite, makers have their own characteristic details and touches, the recognition of which may give their wearers some pleasure.

Others gain pleasure from wearing a skin-cancer-sized mega polo player on their chests.

It's a matter of taste.
 

Edward Appleby

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I mean, they made it, they have a right to mark it, just like an artist signs a painting.
 

lawyerdad

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Originally Posted by Will
The tradition in bespoke is just the reverse. It's my suit, not the artisan's.
Actually, not so different. Most (or many, anyway) artists create work for sale to others. The artisan is still the creator.
 

lawyerdad

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Originally Posted by diorshoe
why do movie credits make you cringe and logos on artworks you hate? just curious, strong words to use to express your feelings on such small and perhaps benign things.
I was wondering that myself - especially with a creative work like a movie, where many people will be interested in finding out who performed certain roles. I often find myself, at the end of a movie, scanning the credits because I couldn't quite remember the name of an actor whose performance struck me or the name of a song that played an important role in the soundtrack.
In clothing, etc. I'm generally of the anti-logo camp (at least, the anti-visible-logo camp), primarily because I don't feel the need to be (1) serving as a free billboard; or (2) proclaiming to the world that I'm rich/cool/whatever enough to wear Brand X. But I have no objection to -- and in fact like -- a discreet label visible only to me. Indeed, my memory is crappy enough that for clothing I've owned for a while that I might need such a label down the road to help me recall who made the garment and/or where I bought it.
 

Rolo

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Originally Posted by lawyerdad
In clothing, etc. I'm generally of the anti-logo camp (at least, the anti-visible-logo camp), primarily because I don't feel the need to be (1) serving as a free billboard; or (2) proclaiming to the world that I'm rich/cool/whatever enough to wear Brand X. But I have no objection to -- and in fact like -- a discreet label visible only to me. Indeed, my memory is crappy enough that for clothing I've owned for a while that I might need such a label down the road to help me recall who made the garment and/or where I bought it.

I, too, tend toward the anti logo side. I don't at all, however, mind labels, etc. that aren't visible when I'm wearing a garment. Heck, I even do this myself with MTM shirts where I tend to add gussets in odd contrasting colors.

This being said, every once and a while I run across a label/logo/mark that I sort of like. For example, I'm very fond of the little red piece of corduroy that Cordarounds puts on its pants.
 

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