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The Schmuck (ehemm WONDERFUL HUMAN BEING) Who Gave Jeter His Ball Back

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by NewYorkIslander, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. Slopho

    Slopho Senior member

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    Its not about "being nice", or "doing the right thing", but this guy and his family will spend tens of thousands of dollars in their lifetime on MLB, and the Yankees. Its all the hard work they put into their lives that they choose to spend on baseball which enables guys like Jeter to earn what they earn. Sure he's a throwback, but he's not making throwback money. I wish I could earn millions by playing a game for a living, playing it for 20 years, retiring, and live large. Sure you get up early for BP and get beaned, and sure it takes hard work but they also have more time off than teachers (October through March 1). Cry me a river. I'm not saying he should have fleeced the Yanks or Jeter, but the fact that they never even thought giving back financially to the fans who allow these ungrateful (mostly) and overpaid athletes to be what they are is disgusting.
    Bold point #1 - And the fact that he's not making "throwback money" is his fault?? Bold point #2 - You make it sound so easy. Playing some game?? I'd like to see you stand in a pro arena, ring, diamond of field for 3 minutes and see how you'd do, which leads me to point #3 Do you really think he doesn't do anything Yankee related during the off season?? Do you really believe that? He may go to children's hospitals and other charitable events that will make extra money just because his name is on the program. Bunch of socialist in this thread.
     
  2. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Thread summary:

    NYRanger, a public school teacher in a district that graduates half its students, is outraged that someone who did absolutely no work hasn't tried to milk as much money as possible out of someone for the fruit of their labor.
     
  3. BDC2823

    BDC2823 Senior member

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    The ones in NY do. Why shouldn't people be upset when something that they used to be able to do has become unreachable? Its a microcosm of life in America, everything is becoming more and more expensive relative to wages most American's earn. We are the greatest nation in the world because for years these things were available to "the people". Now its becoming another thing for "the elites". Just don't go, and its a choice don't cut it, when for generations people have put their hearts and souls in a local team, and then it becomes impossible for the same fans to even see their team live.

    One works for the Devils. Speaking of NY, the Yankees are second in average home attendance behind the Phillies. This shows that people are willing to pay the prices that are charged to attend their games. Of course, these prices have to be higher than say the Royals because there is more competition to purchase Yankees tickets which drives prices up, and the Yankees spend a shitload on players salaries in an attempt to put the best and most marketable team on the field. Yankees tickets could be more affordable but it would come at the expense of their team. No Teixiera, Jeter, Arod, etc. and the team payroll decreases by a lot meaning they have to generate less revenue to reach their breakeven point. They can then charge less for tickets as the team would be less competitive anyways and people would most likely not be as willing to pay the prices of today for a lesser product. But you can't have it both ways as fans. Either your team spends money for better players attracting a larger fan base and prices rise, or your team doesn't spend money on players and the team isn't as good, less people want to go to games, and prices lower.

    Everything becoming more and more expensive in comparison to wages is an issue not directed at professional sports itself. That's more of an issue with America's monetary, economic, and political policies/philosophies. While I wholeheartedly agree with your statement about prices rising at a rate not relative to wages, and while I feel this is a huge problem, it's a whole different discussion and one in which professional sports, is more a product of the environment than a reason for it.
     
  4. Slopho

    Slopho Senior member

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    Also, you mentioned Ripken in your first post, this guy stayed on the field for upwards of two hours after games signing autographs after the strike. Pampered my ass.
     
  5. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Why shouldn't people be upset when something that they used to be able to do has become unreachable? Its a microcosm of life in America, everything is becoming more and more expensive relative to wages most American's earn.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    NYR you really are one of the worst posters here. Sorry.
     
  7. NewYorkIslander

    NewYorkIslander Senior member

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    Also, you mentioned Ripken in your first post, this guy stayed on the field for upwards of two hours after games signing autographs after the strike. Pampered my ass.

    I mentioned Ripkin as a similar type player to Jeter, being first rate and classy. Staying after 2 hours every game to sign autographs after the strike. Why not before? Did he do that for every game? Home and away? Maybe a few times. How about the meal money players get every day? How about the team masseuses? Personal trainers? The fact that half of these guys cheated and used steroids (not saying this is the case with Jeter or Ripkin). If you're a pro athlete your fucking pampered. Period. No matter how classy you are.
     
  8. NewYorkIslander

    NewYorkIslander Senior member

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    NYR you really are one of the worst posters here. Sorry.

    Please quote what offends you so much. Where am I so far off base?
     
  9. NewYorkIslander

    NewYorkIslander Senior member

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    Bold point #1 - And the fact that he's not making "throwback money" is his fault??

    Bold point #2 - You make it sound so easy. Playing some game?? I'd like to see you stand in a pro arena, ring, diamond of field for 3 minutes and see how you'd do, which leads me to point #3

    Do you really think he doesn't do anything Yankee related during the off season?? Do you really believe that? He may go to children's hospitals and other charitable events that will make extra money just because his name is on the program.

    Bunch of socialist in this thread.


    Point 1 - When people refer to guys as throwbacks, yea, it is. Everyone says he's a throwback. Bullshit. He makes 20 million a year. Throwbacks would make 40K and play the way he does.

    Point 2 - You could say the same exact thing about my job, your job, any job.

    I wonder how much "extra money" is earned by charities that any athletes attach their names to? Then I'd like to compare it to how much that athlete makes by doing endorsements. I bet you can guess which is more. Driven a Ford lately?
     
  10. Slopho

    Slopho Senior member

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    Ranger, you are one jaded dude.
     
  11. chevron

    chevron Well-Known Member

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    Anybody feeling actuarial? What's the expected value of a pair of lifetime tickets in a Legends Suite between the dugouts?
     
  12. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    I disagree with that. Its a business, always was, always will be, and the customer is the fan. Its more underlying in sport (the businessman always on the hustle at the customers expense) than in other areas of business, but its there. $10 for a beer at the stadium, $8 for a hot dog, etc... I feel that the least they could have done was offer him some sort of real financial compensation, or lifetime season tickets (after all, the guy gave the ball back for NOTHING, if thats not a super fan what is?).

    Especially here in NY where people (myself included here) are often priced out of tickets to ball games. Yankee Stadium in particular is ridiculous. To take your family to the game will cost you at least $500 (between parking, tickets, souvenirs, hot dogs, ect) and all of that goes to the NYY or whatever team you are going to see (Mets, Giants, Jets, Rangers, Knicks). I don't know what rices are like at Turner Field, but I'm pretty sure most places don't even come close to NY prices, and most franchises around the country don't make what NY teams do.

    The Huffington Post did a great article about how you need to take out a mortgage to have Ranger season tickets (which I had to give up...its far more pricey than my bespoke hobby).

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-ru..._b_891242.html


    I think I partially agree with you. I do find it disappointing that the Yankees didn't do more for the guy, and lifetime season tickets would have been a great gesture. I think where we disagree is in the judgement of the guy who gave the ball back. It was a really cool thing to do, and I found it jarring that people were so willing to criticize him.

    Reading about the expense of sports of up there is shocking to me. The food at the Ted is expensive, but they let you bring your own stuff, provided it's non-alcoholic and drinks are in plastic bottles. You can get tickets in the upper deck behind home plate for $20 each, and they're not bad seats. Parking is $10-15. So, figuring in the cost of snacks (say $10), a few beers at the asinine prices ($28), tickets ($50 with "service fees"), and parking ($15), the missus and I could see a Braves game at the Ted for right around $100. Add in a couple of kids, and it's about $150, a bit more if you get them souvenirs. That's certainly not cheap, but it pales in comparison to what you're describing.
     
  13. Dakota rube

    Dakota rube Senior member

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    Thread summary:

    NYRanger, a public school teacher in a district that graduates half its students, is outraged that someone who did absolutely no work hasn't tried to milk as much money as possible out of someone for the fruit of their labor.


    I don't agree with NYR's assessment of the dude who caught the ball, but SHero's post is rather harsh.
     
  14. BDC2823

    BDC2823 Senior member

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    Point 1 - When people refer to guys as throwbacks, yea, it is. Everyone says he's a throwback. Bullshit. He makes 20 million a year. Throwbacks would make 40K and play the way he does.

    Point 2 - You could say the same exact thing about my job, your job, any job.

    I wonder how much "extra money" is earned by charities that any athletes attach their names to? Then I'd like to compare it to how much that athlete makes by doing endorsements. I bet you can guess which is more. Driven a Ford lately?


    Pt. 1. He is a throwback by the way he plays the game. He makes 20 mil a year because that's what the Yankees feel he is worth to them. It would be asinine for him not to take the contract.

    Pt. 2. No you can't. I played baseball growing up, played with his teammate Phil Hughes, and was pretty damn good. I have nowhere near the talent level pros have and can't compete on that level. But there are a plethora of jobs that I have the ability to perform at a high level given time and training. Professional sports is not one of them.
     
  15. bringusingoodale

    bringusingoodale Senior member

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    I would have sold it back to Jeter and asked him to match my price to some charity to cut out any middleman that would have done the same. Would have made for good photoshoot and people would have thought me less of a Schmuck. Then again I am not aware if there are any rules prohibiting such a thing in the MLB.

    Get of your high horses people.
     
  16. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Please quote what offends you so much. Where am I so far off base?
    Everywhere. Your entire premise is that "common folks" are increasingly being marginalized in society, and to draw your conclusion, you cite the salary growth of professional athletes, whose salaries are paid for with the discretionary income of "common folks". If these people really were being marginalized, and priced out of your subjective value of the lifestyle they "deserve", the income of professional athletes would be decreasing in relation to inflation due to the unavailability of resources for middle class people to spend on entertainment and leisure activity. You have the IQ of a rosin bag.
     
  17. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    I don't agree with NYR's assessment of the dude who caught the ball, but SHero's post is rather harsh.
    If it wasn't true, it wouldn't be harsh. There is a greater sense of self-entitlement and narcissism in NYRanger than the entire Exeter cafeteria. It would be hilarious if it wasn't so pathetic.
     
  18. Slopho

    Slopho Senior member

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    I think I partially agree with you. I do find it disappointing that the Yankees didn't do more for the guy, and lifetime season tickets would have been a great gesture. I think where we disagree is in the judgement of the guy who gave the ball back. It was a really cool thing to do, and I found it jarring that people were so willing to criticize him.

    Reading about the expense of sports of up there is shocking to me. The food at the Ted is expensive, but they let you bring your own stuff, provided it's non-alcoholic and drinks are in plastic bottles. You can get tickets in the upper deck behind home plate for $20 each, and they're not bad seats. Parking is $10-15. So, figuring in the cost of snacks (say $10), a few beers at the asinine prices ($28), tickets ($50 with "service fees"), and parking ($15), the missus and I could see a Braves game at the Ted for right around $100. Add in a couple of kids, and it's about $150, a bit more if you get them souvenirs. That's certainly not cheap, but it pales in comparison to what you're describing.


    Come on dude, lifetime season tickets. The guy is 23 years old. That is worth probably 10 times the amount that ball would have brought in. Like I've said before. He's basically a lottery winner, he sat down where Jeter just happend to hit the ball. Why is it the Yankees responsiblity to give this guy "lifetime" season tickets. Give this guy an auto ball bat and jersey and call it a day.
     
  19. eddievddr10

    eddievddr10 Senior member

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    ding! ding! ding!
    Come on dude, lifetime season tickets. The guy is 23 years old. That is worth probably 10 times the amount that ball would have brought in. Like I've said before. He's basically a lottery winner, he sat down where Jeter just happend to hit the ball. Why is it the Yankees responsiblity to give this guy "lifetime" season tickets. Give this guy an auto ball bat and jersey and call it a day.
    your a moron, the ball wouldve went for 250k easy stop saying its not worth much, its worthwhat ppl would pay for it and that figure is 6 digits. The yanks couldve gave the kid the money and it wouldve great pr and everyone wouldve been happy, now everyone is talking how the yanks took advantage f this kid who was caught up in the moment and couldnt think straight. 250k is pocket change to jeter or the yanks
     
  20. Nananine

    Nananine Senior member

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