1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

The reading room - books on business, management, productivity and so forth...

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Matt, Feb 11, 2011.

  1. makker

    makker Senior member

    Messages:
    203
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2009
    Any recommendations for great readings on finance for a college student to understand the area of IB further on? Nothing too technical, has to be interesting with nice parallels to real-world events.

    For example Options, Futures and Other Derivatives by John C. Hull, do you guys recommend reading it?
     
  2. Redwoood

    Redwoood Senior member

    Messages:
    1,610
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    This book, while giving some limited overview of capital markets, is more aimed at prospective quants, i.e., it is quite technical.
     
  3. qma

    qma Senior member

    Messages:
    114
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Location:
    Oslo
    In terms of sales, my opinion is that one essential book is SPIN-selling by Neil Rackham. Very good. Another one which has influenced me alot is The Origin of Wealth by Beinhocker. He pretty much presents the idea of complex adaptive systems (seriously interesting stuff in itself) as applied to economics and how this stands in opposition to the traditional neoclassical ideas of economics (idea of equilibrium based on physical laws etc.) I am so damn intrigued by this complex adaptive system thing that it hurts. The best introduction I have heard on the subject can be found here. The Teaching Company is btw a source of knowledge highly valued by me. Pricey but most of them can be found as torrent. (Though all of this is lectures on audio and not in book-form) On the topic of self-development I have yet to find anything more valuable than Neuro-Linguistic Programming. This is a pretty good introduction. The Effective Executive by Drucker is very good. Pretty much everything Drucker has written is excellent.
     
  4. millionaire75

    millionaire75 Senior member

    Messages:
    963
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    I have The Accidental Investment Banker and Den of Thieves up next.

    Accidental Investment Banker was good. My old boss was mentioned in it a few times (not in a good light). Also check out Monkey Business...really funny book about IB.
     
  5. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    5,780
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Any recommendations for great readings on finance for a college student to understand the area of IB further on? Nothing too technical, has to be interesting with nice parallels to real-world events.


    http://www.amazon.com/Monkey-Busines...1521271&sr=8-8
     
  6. whacked

    whacked Senior member

    Messages:
    7,364
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
  7. Jkhan82

    Jkhan82 Senior member

    Messages:
    135
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    New York, N.Y.
    Books that I've read and always recommend are: The Success Principles by Jack Canfield ( I've read tons of books, I wish I would have found this sooner, Jack Canfield takes best of every book and pieces into togather. Honestly if your just going to read 1 book..this would be the one.) Now Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham, really pushes you to pursue what you want to do in this one life you have. Rework by Jason Fried, Amazing book about starting and running a internet business but the advice can apply to anything. Crush it! by Gary Vaynerchuk, love him or hate him, he's book will really put you in the forefront of getting your name out and making yourself a brand. Google his Web 2.0 Expo NY video, you'll get a hint of his persona and what he's all about! Love it! Awakening The Giant Within by Anthony Robbins, first self development book I ever read and I still go back to it over and over. It's one of the best selling books of all time. ( Actually few spots below the Bible..I'm not joking) hmmm I'll add to more books that really helped me to start my business, though not your business style books. I think everyone in the world should read them, nothing is more important then a positive attitude in life to accomplish anything..anything well at-least. Spiritual Book: A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle Novel: Alchemist by Paulo Coelho I've read over 100 plus books..these I've returned to over and over again. Also those who don't have much time to read or aren't really into reading much check out philosophers notes, 100 self development books summed up into 3 page pdf's, really well produced, I loved it. www.philosophersnotes.com Enjoy!
     
  8. stayclassy

    stayclassy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    67
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    Location:
    Land of Enchantment
    I read Brain Rules at the beginning of the year, what a great book!
     
  9. APK

    APK Senior member

    Messages:
    7,798
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    Location:
    MI
    Crush it! by Gary Vaynerchuk, love him or hate him, he's book will really put you in the forefront of getting your name out and making yourself a brand. Google his Web 2.0 Expo NY video, you'll get a hint of his persona and what he's all about! Love it!

    I sat down with this at a Barnes & Noble one lonely Saturday night last fall and wasn't impressed. I read about half of it, before realizing the rest probably wasn't worth the time. It read more like a parody of a book from this genre with the author's constant boasting, setting up non-applicable situations and interspersing the phrase "crush it" on a comically frequent basis.
     
  10. Matt

    Matt Senior member

    Messages:
    11,179
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    Sunny Saigon
    I'm working my way through The 80/20 Principle at the moment.

    Not all that impressed, but still giving it a shot.

    I am about a third of the way through. So far it boils down to:

    'here is the 80-20 rule' 'it is powerful' 'it happens a lot, there is imbalance in the universe' 'it's not always 80-20, sometimes its 83-14'
    'here is the 80-20 rule' 'it is powerful' 'it happens a lot, there is imbalance in the universe' 'it's not always 80-20, sometimes its 68-11'
    'here is the 80-20 rule' 'it is powerful' 'it happens a lot, there is imbalance in the universe' 'it's not always 80-20, sometimes its 91-26'....

    On the recommendation of both PersonalMBAdotcom and ArtisanFandotgov, I read Made to Stick. That was really good...
     
  11. bbaquiran

    bbaquiran Senior member

    Messages:
    3,101
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Just finished Seth Godin's All Marketers are Liars. I thought it was good, and will check out his other books. Brain Rules is next.
     
  12. bbaquiran

    bbaquiran Senior member

    Messages:
    3,101
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Also have read:

    Good to Great
    The Goal (also highly recommend, even though it reads somewhat like a novel)
    One Phone Call Away (good for networking, even though the author Really Likes Himself)
    Small Giants
    Predictable Surprises
    On Writing Well (fantastic)
    Win Friends and Influence People
    - and there's one also about public speaking that Dale Carnegie wrote, that too is great.
    Speak like Churchill, Stand like Lincoln (more for speaking than anything)
    StrengthsFinder (um, not worth it IMHO)
    48 Laws of Power (Did not like)

    There are a few more that aren't coming to mind (posting from the office right now), and a few I've yet to read, including First, Break all the Rules, and Creative Destruction. Not sure when I'll get to them.


    Strengthsfinder and First Break All the Rules are from the same person and are basically saying the same thing. IMO the main value of Strengthsfinder is in the online exam.

    The Goal looks like it would be interesting if I were in the manufacturing field, not technical software development. I can get it for cheap at my local bookstore. Do you think it would be helpful?
     
  13. Matt

    Matt Senior member

    Messages:
    11,179
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    Sunny Saigon
    Just finished Seth Godin's All Marketers are Liars. I thought it was good, and will check out his other books.

    Brain Rules is next.

    I'm kind of the opposite [​IMG]

    Started All Marketers Are Liars yesterday. Did Brain Rules a while back. Great read.

    Just finished 80/20 Principle. It is a book that absolutely lives up to it's premise. I could have ignored 80 percent of it, and missed no less than 20 percent of what it had to say. It definitely had some good points, related to business and careers, but made a pretty hideously misguided attempt to relate its premise beyond business.
     
  14. yerfdog

    yerfdog Senior member

    Messages:
    1,334
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    On the recommendation of both PersonalMBAdotcom and ArtisanFandotgov, I read Made to Stick. That was really good...

    Just read this. I agree it was very good.
     
  15. ShaneB

    ShaneB Senior member

    Messages:
    405
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2010
    It's very difficult to 'read business' because business skills are tacit, i.e., they're not really factual in anyway. To be honest, I wouldn't bother with any MBA businessy stuff because a lot of it is trash written by professors, sure, there will be a few nuggets here and there but for the most part it's either a) commonsensical b) utterly worthless. Business is best learnt tacity, through experience - infact, that's the only way to learn it (asking questions etc. as you actually do the thing).

    Saying that, however, what ARE good books to read are those things that ARE factual - books on tax, law, fiancee - these compliment beautifully anything you learn tacitly.

    Those sort of books are usually voluminous but well worth the money, infact, considering the pagination, they're dirt cheap.
     
  16. Redwoood

    Redwoood Senior member

    Messages:
    1,610
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    yes, when it comes to books about fiancÃ[​IMG]es, the price-per-page is the main determinant for my purchasing decision. [​IMG]
     
  17. runsurfswim

    runsurfswim Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Strategy, by Liddel H Hart
    Outliers is great, with an appendix called "Talent is overrated"
    When I find the time, I'm going to look for my technical books in university bookstores. It seems to me that most books at Barnes and Noble on business resemble an owner waiving a stick before a dog and saying, "Do ya want it? Do ya? Yeah? It's a stick boy! Do you want it?"

    And I only say that because I've read some, while trying to work my ass off in a small business with a lot of potential, and found myself useless. Perhaps it wasn't the books, though. </full disclosure>
     
  18. matik23

    matik23 Senior member

    Messages:
    220
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2007
    Not sure if it was mentioned, but kind of underrated is The Four Hour Work Week by Timothy Ferriss. Good stuff Highly recommended.
     
  19. hannibal06

    hannibal06 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    70
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    Very good idea Matt. I will give you a rather unconventional one "Leaving Microsoft to Change the World". It is a story about a Microsoft executive who quits to advance a cause. The book is not tree-huggy and is in fact a hard core management book despite being an enjoyable read.

    +1 !

    While the elements of the "story" were quite moving, there was indeed a lot to be learned. I found the insights into Steve Ballmer's managing habits intriguing as well - would you happen to know an interesting read about him?
     
  20. v0rtex

    v0rtex Senior member

    Messages:
    599
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    Two more votes for Cialdini's Influence and Dale Carnegie.

    The E-Myth Revisited is about how to build systems to run a company, which was the "a-ha" moment for me in working out how people scale businesses.

    Alan Weiss' "Million Dollar Consulting" is about how to run a solo consulting practice but would also be applicable to management. His advice about focusing on (and charging relative to) the value provided to the client completely changed the way I approached my work (I work in a highly technical field, helped me to realize I needed to focus on solving high-value client problems and not just implementing technology, which anyone can do).

    Reading Four Steps to the Epiphany right now, which is about shifting Product Development to a more agile Customer Development approach - build a beta, attract customers, build product around what they want.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by