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The Official Wine Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by audiophilia, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. alexg

    alexg Senior member

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    No picture, but I just tried a 2014 Souhaut Syrah. So good, it was really green tasting to me, but with really concentrated dark fruit. Just an incredibly well balanced, delicious wine.
     
  2. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Pichon Lalande tasting last night. 15 vintages. Not a single one was actually bad, though the weakest was probably the 1993. Surprises for me were the 1999 (excellent and drinkable now), the 1994 (way better than this vintage's reputation) and the 1983 (never had but guess it would have been fading out. it's not).

    the 2000 is awesome, you can tell already, but needs serious time. I loved both the 96 and the 95; prefer the 95 right now. The 96 will, I believe, eventually exceed it. The "controversial" 1990 I have had many times. I liked it. Most in the room did not. the '89 is definitely superior and was the second best of the night. Perfect right now. If you have it, drink it.

    The 86 I actually didn't like. Very hard and closed still. One never knows but the fear at this point is that it will never open up.

    Most at the table said the 85 smelled like soap. I didn't get that. I loved it and put it just behind the 89.

    There is so much one can say about the 82. That's as good as Bordeaux ever gets.
     
    2 people like this.
  3. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    It opens up a bit jammy, then fresh acidity, baking spices and red fruit come into play. Long, fruity, acidic and tannic finish. I think this will improve over the next few year, it's still a bit young. Anyway, nice stuff! Would pick up another bottle or two but it's already sold out.
     
  4. Principle

    Principle Senior member

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    accidental post, medoc coming tonight
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2015
  5. Girardian

    Girardian Senior member

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    Great feedback. Interesting I was also surprised by a '99 Ch. Spleen I had recently. Far from a New World wine, and it far exceeded my expectations of the vintage (Ch√Ęteau Chasse Spleen is about 13 KM south of Pichon Lalande); it would not be to everyone's liking but I was pleasantly surprised.
     
  6. Principle

    Principle Senior member

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    [​IMG] The medoc was thin but satisfying for the price
     
  7. Principle

    Principle Senior member

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    [​IMG] Killer Rioja, savory smoked meats and a long sweet finish when after opening up. Highly recommend.
     
    2 people like this.
  8. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    It's only a 2012 but drinking really well. The blend is heavy on the Syrah and it opened up to a lot of mocha and dark fruit. Really, really nice and brought me back to the time I spent in Linne's barrel room.
     
  9. Principle

    Principle Senior member

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    [​IMG] Semi dry, fruit forward, really clean. Oolong tea and citrus on the nose. Had this with seared white bass. This is really reminiscent of the Connecticut Riesling from the vineyard I used to work for.
     
  10. alexg

    alexg Senior member

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    Has anyone here taken any tests to become a certified sommelier? I'm considering taking level 1 at the end of this month, but I'm not sure if it's worth it.
     
  11. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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  12. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Depends how you are defining worth. I've taken the level one and it was a fun experience but it was local, so I didn't have to travel to do it, and a couple of days vacation and the sign up fee were not hard for me to swing and I'd do it again. In fact, I might have to, as I hear you only have two or three years after your level 1 to go for level 2. I also hear level 2 has become more difficult since sommeliers are all the rage so suddenly doing what it takes to get certified is not worth it for me...and service was always going to be my sticking point as I'm not in the industry.
     
  13. alexg

    alexg Senior member

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    It would be local for me too, and I should be able to get there pretty easily. I think it's 3 years to take level 2, or you need to retake 1 at a reduced rate. I'm really annoyed, I was promised by my school I could take level 1 for free through them, now they suddenly decided to cancel that. For free it was an awesome idea, but it's pretty expensive at full price. The service would be the biggest issue for me too for the same reason. I've never decanted an old wine, much less carried a tray of glasses.
     
  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Sounds to me like maybe not worth it for you, unless of course, you're in the industry.
     
  15. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    buy $500 worth of wine instead and then drink it. You'll learn a lot more than any class.
     
    2 people like this.
  16. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    I strongly disagree with this. My local community college has a pretty well regarded wine industry program - I registered and took their sensory evaluation course (cost was around $400 including tuition and materials fees) and felt it was hugely beneficial in developing my palate and increasing my knowledge. would never have been able to taste the number or variety of wine for that price if I were buying whole bottles and would have gotten less out of tasting them unguided.
     
  17. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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    Cool--just bought 55 bottles of Yellowtail Shiraz. Will report back with what I learn.
     
  18. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    I did a college course too. It was fun, educational, etc. It helped certainly, but I don't even want to calculate what that course cost as a part of tuition. I still don't think classes like this are worth it given the sheer number of books, videos, and other resources that people now have access to. If I want to explore a region, I read up on the region and then over the course of the week taste a few wines from said region.

    The class you describe is not what the intro somm class is. And $525 is a lot of money for the intro somm class. It's not a multi-week course, it's a Saturday and a Sunday, in out and that's it. I think it pretty much exists to help fund all of the other levels.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2015
  19. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    At the intro somm you'll taste 30-40 wines and you'll be lead through "the grid" and deductive method by master somms several times. They have everyone stand and contribute to a tasting individually. That's just the part about actually tasting wines.

    If you don't have a college course available, or the time to take one, the somm 1 is a nice experience to have under your belt. While I think testing a crap ton of wine is the most important aspect, if you don't work in the industry or are surrounded by knowledgeable wine folks in your personal life, I think there's some value to the intro somm class that will improve what you derive from tasting a crap ton of wine on your own.
     

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