The Official Wine Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by audiophilia, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,301
    Likes Received:
    13,554
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
  2. Raoul Duke

    Raoul Duke Senior member

    Messages:
    975
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    

    I'd agree with everyone's thoughts so far. 2007 was a terrible vintage in Bordeaux, while 2009 on the other hand was quite excellent. I don't think the 2007 Chateau Fage was flawed, just a bad, out of balance wine. I'm not sure what you are expecting from a $10 off-vintage, unclassified Bordeaux. While a decant would likely smooth it out a little, I wouldn't expect significant improvement.

    As for the 2009 Barons de Rothschild being "great", I'm curious as to what your frame of reference is to describe a wine that all signs point to being incredibly mediocre as such.

    Unless you are broke and/or you drink every day, I can't see a reason to be drinking wine like this. I personally don't see it as worth the calories, the strain on my liver or even the $10. There may be some regions where you can find a great bottle of wine for $10 or less, but Bordeaux is not one of them. I'm not saying you need to go for broke with First Growths, but pick up something from a reliable Chateau, from a good vintage, with a bit of age on it to see what Bordeaux really has to offer.
     
  3. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,397
    Likes Received:
    8,780
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    I don't consider myself to have any sort of amazing frame of reference, this is why I was inquiring, by saying it was great I meant it was enjoyable to drink with dinner and I didn't pour it down the sink like I did with the Fage. I was in no way expecting clouds to part, but merely trying to find a good table wine for drinking with meats at dinner. The Fage was $14, the Rothschild was $17 and the Saint-Emilion was $18. I wouldn't bother with an under $10 bottle. I am just trying to experiment to get a sense of regions without buying $30 bottles. Surely, this can be done.

    What is a reliable Chateau? I'll probably be going to Astor wines today to shop around.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  4. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,301
    Likes Received:
    13,554
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    At that price point my best suggestion is a second label from a good Rutherford, CA maker. B.V. (thanks vinouspleasure!) makes a great Rutherford Cab for about $22 that would fit your bill perfectly. If you're stuck on a Froggie wine I can't help but I will offer that I've found them to be much harder to score with at this price point. Everything I've tried at this level drips the graphite taste that I am not too fond of.
     
  5. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,397
    Likes Received:
    8,780
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    I see, thanks for the insight.
     
  6. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

    Messages:
    33,650
    Likes Received:
    856
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    Reliable medium priced bordeaux is Chateau Greysac, but as others have mentioned before, there is some atypical bottle variation there.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  7. tattersall

    tattersall Senior member

    Messages:
    1,236
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Location:
    Canuckistan
    

    I'd add Ch Potensac and Ch Goulee to the good value bdx list. 2005's and 2006's should be easy enough to find and are drinking well.
     
  8. Quatsch

    Quatsch Senior member

    Messages:
    630
    Likes Received:
    14
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
  9. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

    Messages:
    9,673
    Likes Received:
    406
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2008
    Location:
    Knee deep in curds
    

    I meant American Chard's generally... I know it all depends on the sugars etc but the typical wisdom (for what it's worth) is that 15 years is generally rather long in the tooth and fruit would be fading.

    No hard and fast rules of course...
     
  10. Raoul Duke

    Raoul Duke Senior member

    Messages:
    975
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    

    I grabbed the prices from wine searcher and they both appeared to be in the $10 range. Bordeaux has become an increasing difficult region to enjoy at $30 or less. The price increases seen over the last 10 years have been exponential. That being said, even within other regions, I generally don't bother with anything less than $30. I consume maybe 4-8 bottles a month and I don't have time for something that doesn't excite me or have the potential to be an exceptional experience.

    I used to try a ton of sub par wine and I never got a true sense of what regions I like as it was all marginally drinkable with very little enjoyment. Now I go a different route. I pick a region and buy some of the best examples of what it has to offer (within reason, no Lafite, Latour, Petrus, etc.) and then if I don't like those, I just steer clear. If I like it, then I start branching off to different producers who make their wine in a similar style.

    I recommend that you look for tasting groups in your area (there is plenty). You may have to spend $50-$100 to buy a bottle to bring, but that'll give you exposure to additional 12 or so top tier wines.

    As for a recommendation, like I said, Bordeaux is tough for under $30. At that price range, you likely won't get anything classified, but just focus on sticking to a good vintage (recently 2000, 2005, 2009, 2010 and to a lesser extent 2008). If you do some research via cellartracker and the like, you may be able to find some quality buys.
     
  11. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Likes Received:
    1,061
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    

    well-made chards can go. i've got a vertical of stony hills going back to the early 90s. of course, they are the exception to the rule.
     
  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,397
    Likes Received:
    8,780
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    


    Great advice, thank you. I am definitely going to join a tasting group. I was thinking about joining the Kermit Lynch club where they send you a bottle a month or something, but I think I can get a lot more out of meeting and talking to people.
     
  13. tattersall

    tattersall Senior member

    Messages:
    1,236
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Location:
    Canuckistan
    

    I love Kermit Lynch wines, but he does not love much from Bordeaux.
     
  14. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Likes Received:
    1,061
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    tasting groups are good, but you might benefit more at the start from taking a couple of classes. most wine shops offer tasting classes now. they'll give you the lay of the land, familiarize you with the terminology and you can taste representative samples. depending on the tasting group, at this point it might be like taking a knife to a gunfight. they can get pretty competitive/geeky (think CE SWD, etc).
     
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,397
    Likes Received:
    8,780
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    I have a lot of anxiety over all of this. It seems like there really isn't even a "groupthink" to make decisions for you in wine. Anybody who I talk to at a wine shop has their own tastes and preferences. This one particular guy is constantly trying to get me to buy Malbec when I insist that I don't care for them. I have zero ego when it comes to wine and no shame. I am new and I admit it so exposing myself to these nerds might be what I need to start.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by