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The Official Wine Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by audiophilia, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    2009 Domaine Philippe Tessier Cheverny Rouge. Man, was it good for a $14 bottle. K&L purchase, bought a couple and wish I had purchased more.
     


  2. Raoul Duke

    Raoul Duke Senior Member

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    Just cracked a bottle -- 2008 D'Arenberg The Laughing Magpie Shiraz/Viognier.

    On edit: Too soon. Needs at least 2-3 years.
     


  3. QBNCGAR

    QBNCGAR Well-Known Member

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    My search-fu skills here are lacking, forgive the possible re-post. Wondering if there's a general guideline for how long is too long to keep a given varietal corked. We went on a bootlegging binge (don't ask) a while back and haven't been able to drink enough to make a dent (don't ask). Got some semi-dry and sweet whites from regional small-batch wineries in the midwest for kicks because they go well with finger foods; a couple of Chardonnay / Pinot Grigio bottles that I'm worried about incl. a Cakebread from '05, and a bunch of reds (mostly Cabs and Pinots with an occasional Merlot) dating to '02 and '03. Thanks in advance.
     


  4. Eustace

    Eustace Distinguished Member

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  5. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    My search-fu skills here are lacking, forgive the possible re-post. Wondering if there's a general guideline for how long is too long to keep a given varietal corked. We went on a bootlegging binge (don't ask) a while back and haven't been able to drink enough to make a dent (don't ask). Got some semi-dry and sweet whites from regional small-batch wineries in the midwest for kicks because they go well with finger foods; a couple of Chardonnay / Pinot Grigio bottles that I'm worried about incl. a Cakebread from '05, and a bunch of reds (mostly Cabs and Pinots with an occasional Merlot) dating to '02 and '03. Thanks in advance.

    Stuff with high alcohol, or residual sugar will last longer than anything else, in general. So the semi-dry, maybe MAYBE 2 days, the sweet whites, 2-3, Chard/Pinot Gris I'd say next day, but even then most of the high note fruits will have been blown off, and the Pinot Noir is anybody's guess. Some barely stay alive for 6 hours, some stay alive for 36 hours.

    Also, the amount left in the bottle has a pretty large effect on oxidation.
     


  6. QBNCGAR

    QBNCGAR Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry - I wasn't clear, was I. By "corked" I meant "unopened". I've not opened any of these bottles at all and am wondering how to gauge whether a given bottle may be past its prime. Once I open one, we pretty much finish it the same day.
     


  7. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    I'm sorry - I wasn't clear, was I. By "corked" I meant "unopened". I've not opened any of these bottles at all and am wondering how to gauge whether a given bottle may be past its prime. Once I open one, we pretty much finish it the same day.

    Oh. Well in that case, it's more or less the same. High alcohol or residual sugar can make wines age much longer. But it's really a toss-up. The ability to slowly mature over time is the mark of a well-made wine over anything else, IMO. Pinot Grigio doesn't age very long, unless it's a very specific kind. I'd say drink within a couple years of vintage. Chardonnay can sometimes last a very long time, but most of it can't. If the Cakebread bottle you have is a Chardonnay from '05, it'll be fine for a couple more years. The pinot/merlot/cab shouldn't be over the hill yet, as 8-9 years old, but depending on the quality of the producer or the quality of the vintage it could be. Although not always reliable, if you google the wine, producers usually give "drinking windows" for their various cuvees and vintages. And barring that, CellarTracker has pretty accurate drinking windows as well. Go to www.cellartracker.com and search for the bottle.
     


  8. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    High alcohol or residual sugar can make wines age much longer.

    interesting, this is the first time I've heard this. I've always associated high alcohol or residual sugar as making a wine "big" but with little or no correlation to aging potential. I know there is a big question mark around a lot of the high alcohol and high residual sugar "fruit bombs" of Cali and their aging potential. It's true that a lot of the Cali wines from the 70's are still wonderful today (thanks to Manton's testimony), but they certainly aren't making the wines in the same style as they do now.
     


  9. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    interesting, this is the first time I've heard this. I've always associated high alcohol or residual sugar as making a wine "big" but with little or no correlation to aging potential. I know there is a big question mark around a lot of the high alcohol and high residual sugar "fruit bombs" of Cali and their aging potential. It's true that a lot of the Cali wines from the 70's are still wonderful today (thanks to Manton's testimony), but they certainly aren't making the wines in the same style as they do now.

    Well both act as a preservative from oxidation. They have no correlation to whether or not the wine will "mature" in the way we like to think of it.
     


  10. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    I used to think high sugar = wine that can age. I've learned different.
     


  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Had a 2009 Thivin Brouilly tonight. First 2009 Beaujolais I've tasted, I think, and this was just fantastic. One of the more memorable wines I've had this year.
     


  12. Pennglock

    Pennglock Distinguished Member

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    Had a 2009 Thivin Brouilly tonight. First 2009 Beaujolais I've tasted, I think, and this was just fantastic. One of the more memorable wines I've had this year.

    2009 is going to go down as a special vintage for this region, I think. Ive had 2 others and they were knockouts.
     


  13. tattersall

    tattersall Distinguished Member

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    The 09 Beaujolais cru are really great despite the high alcohol in many wines - both the Thivin and Lapierre Morgon are drinking very well. I recently picked up some of the rare Lapierre cuvee MMIX to lay down (3 magnums worth... [​IMG] ).
     


  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    2009 Les Vins Jean Claude Debeaune Fleurie Clos des Quatre Vents. Should I try it now, given all the Beaujolais love going on here?
     


  15. Slewfoot

    Slewfoot Distinguished Member

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    interesting, this is the first time I've heard this. I've always associated high alcohol or residual sugar as making a wine "big" but with little or no correlation to aging potential. I know there is a big question mark around a lot of the high alcohol and high residual sugar "fruit bombs" of Cali and their aging potential. It's true that a lot of the Cali wines from the 70's are still wonderful today (thanks to Manton's testimony), but they certainly aren't making the wines in the same style as they do now.

    Well both act as a preservative from oxidation. They have no correlation to whether or not the wine will "mature" in the way we like to think of it.

    The combination of acidity and tannin I've found to be the winning combination for allowing wines to age gracefully for decades. However, the key is balance, balance, balance. No aspect - be it the alcohol, acidity, tannins - should be too overpowering or nearly non-existent.
     


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