The Official Wine Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by audiophilia, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,303
    Likes Received:
    13,561
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    who is brett?

    Something tells me you would probably like him, in small doses.
     


  2. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Likes Received:
    2,047
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    That's pio's little nickname for brettanomyces
    ah. gotcha. I don't like poop and barnyard as descriptors. I prefer gamey.
     


  3. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

    Messages:
    5,663
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Has anyone opened a 2002 burgundy recently?
     


  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Likes Received:
    2,047
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    Has anyone opened a 2002 burgundy recently?
    Yes, a month or so ago.
     


  5. Mark from Plano

    Mark from Plano Lifestyle change - no homo

    Messages:
    10,781
    Likes Received:
    253
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2007
    Location:
    Not in Plano
    Has anyone opened a 2002 burgundy recently?

    Had a great 2002 Charmes-Chambertin last march. Great wine was great.
     


  6. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,303
    Likes Received:
    13,561
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    Just got this WTSO email:

    Was thinking, "Great!I'll pick up an order and try myself my first Grand Cru Montrachet." Then read this:

    [​IMG] No, no I won't be trying it.
     


  7. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

    Messages:
    33,652
    Likes Received:
    857
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    FWIW, that's a really great price.....[​IMG]
     


  8. tattersall

    tattersall Senior member

    Messages:
    1,236
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Location:
    Canuckistan
    Has anyone opened a 2002 burgundy recently?

    Here was mine a little while ago:

    In honour of US thanksgiving we had a small bird last night and cracked open something special

    Since I'm not a true baller like Petrus1/lucifer it's only a 1er cru but it ended up being a very nice one. I note that both Jancis and Hugh in their Atlas single out this producer as one of the better ones in Pommard so both team Pio and team Petrus should be pacified...

    2002 Domaine de Montille Pommard 1er cru "Les Pezerolles" - the vineyard is very close to Pommard but the producer is based in Volnay, so something of an odd duck but it was really wonderful. A much lighter wine than I'm used to drinking but a stunning complexity and a great deal of finesse. I gather this would keep for a few more years and even improve but what the hell. This was not at all powerful (only about 12%) and you could certainly taste red fruit - I got strawberry mostly - and a nice minerality too. Would buy again if I could find it. Was perfect with roasted duck.

    [​IMG]
     


  9. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,303
    Likes Received:
    13,561
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    FWIW, that's a really great price.....[​IMG]

    Yeah, and I would love to try it. However, I won't go north of $60 on a bottle without someone, who's taste I trust, giving a personal rec. Remember, at heart, I'm a cheap bastard.
     


  10. ama

    ama Senior member

    Messages:
    3,823
    Likes Received:
    52
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Yeah, and I would love to try it. However, I won't go north of $60 on a bottle without someone, who's taste I trust, giving a personal rec. Remember, at heart, I'm a cheap bastard.

    Did you have to sell your post count for the sous-vide machine?
     


  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Likes Received:
    2,047
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    It might have been overwhelmed by all the notes of white-out and baloney.
    IIRC, you like wines from the Languedoc, right? They tend to have a good percentage of mourvedre, which a lot of people see as having this scent. I think in France they call it animale, which is a much better description. Much of it is cultural, I think, and in the US we tend, having no food culture at all, to see daring and shocking as sophisticated, and around these values have grown words we use commonly like "barnyard," "pig face" for pigs head etc. It is like a sign showing club membership, I think. None of this is a comment on the members here using it, just on how our own food and wine culture has developed.
     


  12. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,303
    Likes Received:
    13,561
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    I still smell funk and barnyard.
     


  13. holymadness

    holymadness Senior member

    Messages:
    3,673
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2008
    Location:
    Montreal
    Yeah, and I would love to try it. However, I won't go north of $60 on a bottle without someone, who's taste I trust, giving a personal rec. Remember, at heart, I'm a cheap bastard.
    You are way more prodigal than me.
    IIRC, you like wines from the Languedoc, right? They tend to have a good percentage of mourvedre, which a lot of people see as having this scent. I think in France they call it animale, which is a much better description. Much of it is cultural, I think, and in the US we tend, having no food culture at all, to see daring and shocking as sophisticated, and around these values have grown words we use commonly like "barnyard," "pig face" for pigs head etc. It is like a sign showing club membership, I think. None of this is a comment on the members here using it, just on how our own food and wine culture has developed.
    I don't deny the sometimes-usefulness of wine nomenclature; I am just opposed its fetishization and elaboration to the point of absurdity. I agree that the more esoteric and deliberately repugnant labels are often wielded like status symbols of superior discernment ("What, you can't smell the cat piss and wilted rhododendron? How odd."). This exists in France as well as in the US, though I have noticed far fewer armchair experts here than back home. The average French drinker seems to accept wine as a normal fact of life, not as an object of study.

    Pio writes, "In fact, if you think the grape is Pinot Noir and are having a hard time figuring out if it's New or Old World, the presence of barnyard on the nose will tell you it's most likely a Frenchie." My response is, who cares? That is not an end in itself. I am much more interested in whether the wine was good or bad, what is good or bad about it, and when I should drink it. All the more so because he and I don't share a nose, and because aromatics change over time. I find these sorts of details largely superfluous. To know what wine's second fermentation is called or which Bordeaux were classed in 1855 is simply not very interesting except to a hobbyist.
     


  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,303
    Likes Received:
    13,561
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    You are way more prodigal than me.

    I don't deny the sometimes-usefulness of wine nomenclature; I am just opposed its fetishization and elaboration to the point of absurdity. I agree that the more esoteric and deliberately repugnant labels are often wielded like status symbols of superior discernment ("What, you can't smell the cat piss and wilted rhododendron? How odd."). This exists in France as well as in the US, though I have noticed far fewer armchair experts here than back home. The average French drinker seems to accept wine as a normal fact of life, not as an object of study.

    Pio writes, "In fact, if you think the grape is Pinot Noir and are having a hard time figuring out if it's New or Old World, the presence of barnyard on the nose will tell you it's most likely a Frenchie." My response is, who cares? That is not an end in itself. I am much more interested in whether the wine was good or bad, what is good or bad about it, and when I should drink it. All the more so because he and I don't share a nose, and because aromatics change over time. I find these sorts of details largely superfluous. To know what wine's second fermentation is called or which Bordeaux were classed in 1855 is simply not very interesting except to a hobbyist.


    Jesus, I had to spend $500 for a master sommelier to teach me that and I gave it to you for free.
     


  15. holymadness

    holymadness Senior member

    Messages:
    3,673
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2008
    Location:
    Montreal
    Sorry, I didn't mean to be dickish. I actually know relatively little about wine culture. I do most of my buying by tasting everything in sight at one of these. [​IMG]
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by