The Official Wine Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by audiophilia, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

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    For sure. Nero D'avola, Morellino, Montepulciano, Chiantis, Barbera, Dolcetto, possibilities are endless. How about Righetti Amarone for $16?
     


  2. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    I haven't had the Righetti Amarone, I'll keep my eyes out though. Morellino, however, is often on my table, either that or Carmigniano (both Sangiovese from Tuscany).
     


  3. audiophilia

    audiophilia Senior member

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    That's a whole different animal from the world of Italian wine I'm familiar with.
    And I'm looking forward to begin the journey with Italian reds. When I was a kid, Italian wine was Chianti, with better Chianti Classico on a Sunday! [​IMG] The development of Italian red wines is commensurate with CA. Very exciting. But with 2000 varietals, it's going to be a long, but fun, journey. I've had a couple of Amarones. Love that wine. And had several bottles of [​IMG]. Even better when it was on sale for CAD$19.95. FTW!
     


  4. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    Vino Nobile de Montepulciano, another great area. Sangeovese grape as usual for the region. I always thought they brought a little more oomph to the table compared to some of the other parts in Tuscany, even some Chiantis.

    Don't worry about the 2,000 varietals, focus on the region. Valpolicella is a Valpolicella, don't look at it as a mix of 3-5 archaic sounding grape varietals.




    I love Italian wines, they're 80% of what I drink. I've been especially hooked since visiting the region last November. I took this picture in the Chianti Classico region:

    [​IMG]
     


  5. audiophilia

    audiophilia Senior member

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  6. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

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    Vino Nobile de Montepulciano, another great area. Sangeovese grape as usual for the region. I always thought they brought a little more oomph to the table compared to some of the other parts in Tuscany, even some Chiantis.

    Don't worry about the 2,000 varietals, focus on the region. Valpolicella is a Valpolicella, don't look at it as a mix of 3-5 archaic sounding grape varietals.




    I love Italian wines, they're 80% of what I drink. I've been especially hooked since visiting the region last November. I took this picture in the Chianti Classico region:

    [​IMG]



    Are you referring to corvina, molinara, and rodinella? If so I would be inclined to agree given the fact that I have never seen any of those grapes made into a wine separately.
     


  7. PandArts

    PandArts Senior member

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    Got a million spare?


    Making out a check as we type [​IMG]
     


  8. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    Are you referring to corvina, molinara, and rodinella? If so I would be inclined to agree given the fact that I have never seen any of those grapes made into a wine separately.

    right, those are the big 3 for Valpolicella, though there are sometimes others included in the mix. Amarone is similar, as are dozens of others. I think it's far more important to know about the characteristics of a great Amarone (that rich, raisiny goodness) or Valpolicella (sweet cherries and wild spices) than it is to know exactly what grape they're made of. It's also far easier.


    the only exception I guess could be the super Tuscans which are often made with French varietals.
     


  9. audiophilia

    audiophilia Senior member

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    Making out a check as we type [​IMG]

    My post was directed at you buddy, my Chicagoland, hip condo styled, well dressed, Mad Men wannabe [​IMG], friend!!

    [​IMG]
     


  10. audiophilia

    audiophilia Senior member

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    Originally Posted by Johnny_5 Are you referring to corvina, molinara, and rodinella? If so I would be inclined to agree given the fact that I have never seen any of those grapes made into a wine separately.
    right, those are the big 3 for Valpolicella, though there are sometimes others included in the mix. Amarone is similar, as are dozens of others. I think it's far more important to know about the characteristics of a great Amarone (that rich, raisiny goodness) or Valpolicella (sweet cherries and wild spices) than it is to know exactly what grape they're made of. It's also far easier. the only exception I guess could be the super Tuscans which are often made with French varietals.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     


  11. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

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    ^ I laughed out loud.
     


  12. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    My post was directed at you buddy, my Chicagoland, hip condo styled, well dressed, Mad Men wannabe [​IMG], friend!!

    [​IMG]


    I enjoy hip condos. I'm in the middle of dressing up my apartment at the moment. It's a work in progress, but things are coming together nicely.
     


  13. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    ^ I laughed out loud.

    [​IMG]

    (I know it's not easy, not at all, but this is for fun)
     


  14. vinouspleasure

    vinouspleasure Senior member

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    Well yea a bottle of Artemis $70, Phelps, Jordan and the others you mentiond are surely $100+ and some north of $150 so that should be considered. So the Artemis starts to become much more appealing at its price point. I am going to keep those selections in mind. I am not very well-versed when it comes to California, well actually the United States all together. That's a whole different animal from the world of Italian wine I'm familiar with.
    IMO, Jordan is and has been the poster boy for overpriced, ca wine. Caymus is not all that far behind. Its hard to argue with the consistent quality of phelps, though the pricing for the napa cab has gotten a little out of hand. If you're going to spend money like that for ca cab, you might try etude, a rafinelli (you have to beg the winery for some wine, and while you;re at it, get some of the zin), or togni. I realize that people love jordan and feel that caymus is fairly priced...just one man's opinion here.
     


  15. PandArts

    PandArts Senior member

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    My post was directed at you buddy, my Chicagoland, hip condo styled, well dressed, Mad Men wannabe [​IMG], friend!!

    [​IMG]



    HAHA!!! If only it were that simple for me [​IMG] (one day perhaps?)
     


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