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The Official Wine Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by audiophilia, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    It seems you can find past vintages of leonetti at auction for about half current pricing, fwiw.
     
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  2. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    A bit of melancholy news, a bit of good news.

    One of the couples in our wine circle of friends, actually the couple with the to die for cellar I've posted pics of here before, have decided to substantially thin the cellar. Both are pushing 80, both have had some health issues, and he just told me the other day he wants to give me a huge deal and the pick of his cellar. We're going to a tasting together on 3/24 and I'll discuss with him at that time to come over and look into this. Sad for the reason behind this but excited at a chance to land and eventually drink some stellar stuff. He has 90s verticals of Grange and Hill of Grace I'm really interested in, as well as some other great stuff like 1st growth Bordeaux, Sassicaia, lots of great WA stuff like Cayuse, also SQN...so pretty excited and figure I'll probable score stuff for $1 for $3-5. He wants his stuff to go to a good home.
     
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  3. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    so.. in 5 years when you, NumberNine, and ETO go to the old folks home together, you're going to let us have first crack at your cellar right?
     
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  4. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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  5. Forum Troll

    Forum Troll Active Member

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    Hit that SQN hard. I've not had any that wasn't pretty impressive and most have been stellar.
     
  6. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    '15 Cdp- feminine on the nose (pretty sure it's high % grenache), very good QPR (was ~$15). Slight funk towards the back, but good funk and not overpowering at all.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2017
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  7. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Yeah, every time I've had it it has been killer. Mrs. Piob is a Grenache hound so I figure if he has some of the Grenache dominant bottlings I'll try and grab.
     
  8. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Had a bottle of this last night (too lazy to upload my own photo). The cuvée speciale, fwiw. It was stunningly flavorful--some of the flavors were like a lighter version of the flavors you get in an amaro--and I'm glad I gave it a go. But maybe it's the pleb in me, but I think I prefer my rosés to be a little simpler, with straightforward acidity and pleasantness.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017
  9. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Continuing my '15 Beaujolais run.

    Bright red (with some darker) fruit, some added baked spices/herbs on the back end, good complexity, but stays bright and Bojo-y. ~$20
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2017
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  10. tifosi

    tifosi Senior member

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    Hey all. I'm getting into Bordeaux. Getting a feel for the regions and classification system. I've only tried a few bottles on the cheaper end and my favorite so far is a 2010 fifth growth Paulliac.

    I want to work my way up the growth chart to try to experience the differences...without spending $1-1.5k per bottle (for now). As I work further to the top of the growth ranks I can only buy younger and younger wines for what I'm comfortable spending. Will buying and drinking the younger wines from second and third growth vineyards give a feel for the differences in the classifications? Let's just say I picked 2013 and bought a bottle from the same region from each growth classification...does this seem like a smart way learn and experience?

    I appreciate any feedback. Thanks!
     
  11. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    Unless you are very experienced already, you are going to learn a lot more by drinking 20 $50 bottles than 1 $1000 bottle.
     
  12. tifosi

    tifosi Senior member

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    I agree. That was the basis of my question.

    Any insight into younger vintages of higher class growths?
     
  13. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    I think the consensus is that it is a grave injustice to drink a great wine in it's infancy.

    In seriousness though, generally speaking, more expensive wine will be created with aging in mind - so you are going to be missing out on a lot if you drink it young.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
  14. tifosi

    tifosi Senior member

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    That was kind of my feeling as well. Am I correct to say that cheaper, lower growths are intended to be enjoyed young?

    In your opinion...what would be the youngest second or third growth I should be seeking to try, now?
     
  15. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    I am definitely NOT an authority on BDX, so I don't have any specifics to offer. Are you just recently getting into wine? If so, I would not recommend pigeonholing yourself into BDX right from the start.
     
  16. tifosi

    tifosi Senior member

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    No. I'm only just getting (heavily) into Bordeaux.
     
  17. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    Not necessarily-many of the more traditional bordeauxs, even those in the $20-40 range can last for 20+ years (cantemerle, lanessan are some good examples).
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
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  18. Canadianguy

    Canadianguy Senior member

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    I'm certainly not an expert, but been a Bordeaux enthusiast for a few years.

    I would say that the cru classe system (ie first growth, second etc) doesn't imply anything about the age worthiness of the wines or drinkability in its youth. Any wine that is a cru classe is going to be a serious wine that's designed to be aged to some extent.

    Instead, you might want to look at the different regions and specific producers as offering slightly different styles of drinkability. For example, some Margaux and Graves tend to be more approachable in youth whereas Pauilliac and St Julien are generally harder and remain closed for quite a while.

    You should also consider the blend of each wine. Assemblages with higher % of Merlot will be softer in youth.

    2010 vintages from chateaux that produce a softer style, like Chateau d'Issan from Margaux, should be pretty enjoyable at this point.

    www.thewinecellarinsider.com is a great site where you can learn a lot about the styles of different regions and producers.

    Hope this helps a bit. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
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  19. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Last night we had a bottle of 2014 Ledge Vineyards Zin, Dante Dusi Vineyard. That vineyard, where folks like Turley get a lot of their grapes from, are vines planted in the 1920s. Man, what an enjoyable wine. Very balanced Zin, not overblown, really silky tannins, just an enjoyable drink without being a total fruit/alcohol bomb that was not loaded up on new American oak the way so many are. Lots of whole cluster which is something I really enjoy in grapes from a warmer climate. Had with smoked ribs and baked veggies and it was awesome.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
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  20. Canadianguy

    Canadianguy Senior member

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    Forgot one thing: vintage variation also has a HUGE effect on the drinkability of any producer's wines. Sorry I couldn't give you a simpler answer!
     

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