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The Official Whisk(e)y Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Tyto, Apr 27, 2005.

  1. Tyto

    Tyto Senior member

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    Okay, here is what I hope will become the whisk(e)y omnibus thread (does that sound a modest enough goal?), based on a discussion that began in the infamous black suit thread. We'll start with bourbon because . . . well, because. This is just a start, presented in rough order of preference. I'm clearly forgetting some things, but I'm short on time right now. A.H. Hirsch 16 (Michter's) The clear favorite among many involved in the previous discussion, and I concur. It has good sweetness with lots of complexity, a huge, smooth body, and very long finish. In the words of the owner of the local establishment that carries it, "it's just such a goddamned good whiskey." However, the distillery is long since closed (late "˜80s, IIRC), so what's left is what's left, though prices have actually come down a bit in the past year, and range from $60 to $80. There is also a 20-year-old bottling that's supposedly even better, nearly impossible to find, and costs about $200. Blanton's Single Barrel (Ancient Age/Buffalo Trace) Tops my list of bourbons that are currently in production, though it's arguably not a particularly close second to Hirsch. JBZ has said that "some I have talked to find Blantons to be almost "˜too mellow'," and I've heard the same, but I find that it has plenty of depth (if not as much punch), a good, almost oily body, and a very pronounced vanilla/caramel character. Prices for this generally hover around $50. Booker's (Jim Beam) A bourbon with the attack of an Islay single malt. Very, very smoky and full-flavored, and bottled at cask strength (~125 proof). One of the only bourbons I'll add water to (just a couple of teaspoons really opens it up beautifully), and it also does well in Manhattans, as the vermouth mellows the bourbon perfectly. I wouldn't give it to someone new to bourbon or distilled spirits (unless said person is already an Islay scotch drinker). Â Prices around $50-$60 per bottle. Elijah Craig 12-year (Heaven Hill) My favorite "everyday" bourbon"”ridiculously well-priced at ~$18"”with a great, sweet, floral nose and a smoothness akin to Maker's Mark, but with a bit more punch and complexity. Elijah Craig 18-year (Heaven Hill) Very different from the 12-year: much more smooth and sweet, almost to the point of being too smooth and sweet. I've only dipped into my bottle a couple of times so far, and I'm ambivalent, though it's not truly bad. I think this is analogous to some of the longer-aged Islay scotches that have arguably had the peat smoke aged out of them. Sure, they can be pretty good, but you expect something different. Sazerac Rye 18-year (Buffalo Trace??) Pricey (around $50-$60) but worthwhile: nice and peppery/spicy, with tobacco and other strong, earthy notes. Jefferson's Reserve (Mclain & Kyne) A really nice sipping bourbon. It's smoky and leathery and always reminds me of a wood-paneled study with a brass-studded leather wingback chair. Perfect for a contemplative mood. Priced usually around $45-$60. Often available at Costco for around $40. Maker's Mark (Maker's Mark) Probably because of its low price (often under $20) and ubiquity in the liquor aisle of your local supermarket, MM seems to have acquired a reputation as a poor bourbon. This reputation is unjust and undeserved: this IS a good bourbon. Famously smooth and on the sweeter side, largely because it's a wheated bourbon (i.e., wheat is a large secondary component, as opposed to rye). JBZ observed earlier that it is particularly good for someone who is just "getting into" bourbons, and I agree"”it was my first bourbon and it hooked me. Â MM also makes a couple of higher-end bottlings, though only one (V.I.P., with gold wax instead of red) is available in the states. It's even smoother, and almost too mellow and sweet for me. I've always wanted to visit the MM distillery: it's a National Historic Landmark, and the complex looks simply beautiful in the photos I've seen. Knob Creek (Jim Beam) JBZ mentioned that he found it not all that remarkable, but disagree: I think it has a really nice fruity (peaches?) character to it, though smokiness is definitely there. This one hits a bit harder than, say, Blanton's. It's also a bargain in the low $20s. Eagle Rare 10-year (Buffalo Trace) Another smooth, sweet bourbon in the mold of Maker's Mark. Also good for first-timers, and very reasonably priced (upper $20s). There's an 18-year, as well: it's more expensive, and I've not yet tried it. Woodford Reserve (Brown-Forman) smokier than MM, but quite good. Â Runs about $5 more per bottle. Â I've had it on the rocks and straight up. Misc. Others Others that I don't have time to write about right now, but enjoy: Evan Williams Single Barrel Vintage, Wild Turkey 101, Wild Turkey Russell's Reserve, Corner Creek Reserve, Baker's.
     


  2. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I myself have tried and am partial to most of the above, with my favorite sipping wisky for home now being woodford reserve.

    (not to be pissy, but you included one rye in with your list of bourbons, and they are seperate things, it may be more accurate to call this a list of "American wiskies")
     


  3. Tyto

    Tyto Senior member

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    You're right, but I intended that the discussion would spread to ryes, Scotches, Japanese malts, and whatever else.
     


  4. petescolari

    petescolari Senior member

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    If you are going to include rye's in there, then you must include Old Overholt rye nice and smoky without being sweet. So cheap and so good. Perfect for a manhattan. I love Maker's, but a Manhattan shouldn't be sweet.
     


  5. Patrick Bateman

    Patrick Bateman Senior member

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    Suntory "Hibiki" 17 year. Beautiful, smooth, mellow. Almost like a fine cognac. The 21 year old is good too. I hope one day to try the 30 year.
     


  6. Brian SD

    Brian SD Moderator

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    You forgot WILD TURKEY 101. The best [​IMG]
     


  7. JBZ

    JBZ Senior member

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    Tyto: Great list. Â I think I'll give Knob Creek another try based on your review. Â I've only had it once or twice. Â I also need to track down another bottle of the A.H. Hirsch, as mine is almost empty. [​IMG] Â I think it's a little overpriced for what it is (no doubt due in part to the limited supply), but it's still, as you say, a "goddamned good whiskey." To your list I would add Buffalo Trace (bottled under its own label). Â A smooth, "crisp" bourbon, with perhaps a bit more bite than MM, but still very drinkable. Â Another good one for "first timers," but also good for the more seasoned drinker, IMHO. I think your description of Booker's really hits the mark. Â Comparing it to an Islay Scotch is very accurate. Â I generally have a glass when I feel like I need a BOURBON. Â Quite simply, it's unlike any other bourbon I've ever had. Wild Turkey Rare Breed is also supposed to be quite good, although I've never tried it. For anyone interested in knowing more about bourbon, I would recommend this site. Â Good FAQ section (from the very general to the very specific), and I believe there's also a bourbon forum (as if any of us need another forum to visit). I'd love to see a similar posting with regard to Scotch. Â I could list a few brands that I've enjoyed, but I really don't have the wealth of knowledge to post a definitive list. Â As a rule, Scotch is a much more expensive habit than bourbon. Regards, Jeff
     


  8. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    Definitely forgot Middleton Very Rare, considered by some to be the very best Irish Whiskey on the market, of which I have 3 different years bottled, 2000, 2001, and 2002.
     


  9. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    ....for when your girlfriend dumped you and you want to get comatose....
     


  10. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    Hey I love 101 for sitting around and having a high ball each night after work, nothing wrong with that
     


  11. Cliff

    Cliff Senior member

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    My favorite whisky (using the term very loosely) is Gentleman Jack, if none is available; Jack Daniels. I don't apologize for my plebian tastes.
     


  12. JBZ

    JBZ Senior member

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    Nothing wrong with Jack Daniels. Â Though not a bourbon, it is a fine (IMHO) Tennessee Whiskey. Â The major difference is that JD (and George Dickel) goes through what is known as the Lincoln County Process, whereby the alcohol is filtered through maple charcoal for mellowing purposes. Â To learn more about this, see this link. If I'm out for dinner, my first choice for a drink is bourbon. Â However, if none is available, "Jack Daniels on the rocks" is a terrific alternative that I would never turn down. Â Of course, there are those from Kentucky who would sooner drink arsenic, but they're a little, shall we say, biased.
     


  13. Tyto

    Tyto Senior member

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    As JBZ said, nothing wrong with JD--or, for that matter, with Wild Turkey 101 (the 80, not so much).

    My usual first choice is bourbon also, but when I can't get bourbon other than Jim Beam or worse, I can usually get Johnnie Black, my typical go-to drink.
     


  14. matadorpoeta

    matadorpoeta Senior member

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    the best cheap whiskies are jameson and makers mark. there was one that they sold at trader joe's last year fro about $20 and it was as good as anything else. i just can't remember the name and i didn't save the bottle.
     


  15. faustian bargain

    faustian bargain Senior member

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    anyone here like bushmill's irish whiskey? it's one of my favorite 'daily drinkers'. a notch up would be black bush.

    that said, i'm working on a big bottle of JW red that i got at costco recently. hey, it serves a purpose.

    single malt scotch, i like Oban and Talisker (haven't had the latter for a long time though). both are rather smoky and peaty.

    /andrew
     


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