The official thrift/discount store bragging thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by j, Mar 2, 2005.

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  1. krspdla

    krspdla Senior member

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    I guess it was a broad question, sorry about that. I'm gonna copy this post onto my phone and read it next time I try on a jacket, thanks a lot!
     


  2. alfair

    alfair Member

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    I've read the entire thread from pg 400 onwards now. No post has talked about the quality of the brands I just asked about with the exception being the occasional remark with regards to a pickup. I have learned a great deal w/regards to other brands etc., canvassing, identifying cordovan shoes... I was just looking to fill a couple of gaps that were missing from reading the thread. I did not pm you what to look out for generally other than clothing, perhaps you have me confused with someone else? Either way, thank you k4lnamja.
     


  3. frenchy

    frenchy In Time Out

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    I've read the entire thread from pg 400 onwards now. No post has talked about the quality of the brands I just asked about with the exception being the occasional remark with regards to a pickup. I have learned a great deal w/regards to other brands etc., canvassing, identifying cordovan shoes... I was just looking to fill a couple of gaps that were missing from reading the thread. I did not pm you what to look out for generally other than clothing, perhaps you have me confused with someone else? Either way, thank you k4lnamja.

    thats great but theres another 400 pages before that.look im not trying to bust your chops,but if you had read the other 400 you would have known that all the brands you mentioned are crap,although faconnable is a pretty good brand and i have some of their stuff generally its nothing to write home about.
     


  4. AlanC

    AlanC Minister of Trad

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    FYI: Look at my ebay auctions: http://shop.ebay.com/crazearcade/m.h..._from=&_ipg=25

    See those hideous sweaters? I was just offered $1,100 for all 4 of them. If you see old RL sweaters with big images on them, BUY THEM.


    [​IMG]
     


  5. mainy

    mainy Senior member

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    OK GUYS, BECAUSE I AM TIRED OF READING THIS SHIT: Here is the way to find out what is a WORTH BUYING IN A THRIFT STORE.

    There are 2 ways to identify a quality item in a thrift store: by the brand, or BY KNOWING IT'S NICE BECAUSE YOU HAVE AN EXPERIENCED HAND AND EYE!

    But first we need to figure something out: are you buying items to resell, or are you buying them for yourself? If you're buying it for yourself, then fit is king. Unless you have a great tailor, or a cheap tailor, you should be focusing on items that fit you, or are pretty damn close. You can buy all the awesome Zegna su Misera 15milmil suits you want, but if they're a size too big, and you're never going to get them tailored, or it costs you $150 to get them tailored and they still fit you like crap, what was the point??? If you are buying items for yourself, fit is king kids. Remember, thrift clothing is CHEAP by nature - so if you buy that great tweed jacket which fits great - and hey, maybe it's FUSED but in great shape - when you come across that great vintage Southwick tweed which fits great, you can re-donate your old $7 tweed fused piece of closet filler. Boom.

    Okay, but saying you're not buying for yourself, or you're at an expensive store so even if it fits, you aren't buying it unless it's quality. How do you spot quality? The way most people start is by identifying some top tier brands, and then seeking this out. I would argue that this is not only ineffective, but results in people missing some great merchandise. There is a chance if you are just now getting into the thrift game, maybe you don't know what high end clothing looks like, feels like, etc. So this is what you need to do: pick the nicest retailer of men's clothing in your city, go into the store, and look at the expensive shit. Touch it, look how the buttonholes look, see what a canvassed jacket feels like, determine the difference between machine stitching on the collar padding and hand stitching looks like. Once you have felt and seen quality pieces of clothing, the difference becomes bold and immediate.

    These items will JUMP OFF THE RACK AT YOU. I can literally walk down a rack of jackets, and just by touching the sleeve or looking at the front of the jacket I can determine in a second whether it's worth a damn. You will not learn this skill by memorizing brands, but only by making yourself well acquainted with what makes a piece of clothing nice, and what it feels like. Example of why this is important: Yesterday, I found 3 H. Freeman suits (not Hickey Freeman, IMO H.Freeman are actually nicer - fully canvassed, some handwork, etc.). However, these had all the manufacturer tags removed. If I had just been "tag shopping", I would have passed these over in a second. Instead, I immediately noticed how nice the fabric was, the handsewn lapel buttonhole, etc. and located a tag hidden beyond an inside pocket in the pants. Score!


    Also, lots of stuff out there made by expensive brands, is total garbage. RLPL shirts made in China? Yes sir, they are out there, and they feel like crap. They are not special. Scott Barber shirts that are dime a dozen and have no resale are better buys than MiC RLPL shirts. Will the RLPL shirt still fetch $30 used on ebay? Sure. This is why you have to identify your goals. There are also lots of great, high quality vintage pieces and custom pieces that will NOT bring a dime on Ebay. These are best sold on Styleforum, but until you get some experience you will not have a clue what these items are.

    So basically: Disregard brands. Look for the hallmarks of quality clothing. And reap the rewards.
     


  6. k4lnamja

    k4lnamja Senior member

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    OK GUYS, BECAUSE I AM TIRED OF READING THIS SHIT: Here is the way to find out what is a WORTH BUYING IN A THRIFT STORE.

    There are 2 ways to identify a quality item in a thrift store: by the brand, or BY KNOWING IT'S NICE BECAUSE YOU HAVE AN EXPERIENCED HAND AND EYE!

    But first we need to figure something out: are you buying items to resell, or are you buying them for yourself? If you're buying it for yourself, then fit is king. Unless you have a great tailor, or a cheap tailor, you should be focusing on items that fit you, or are pretty damn close. You can buy all the awesome Zegna su Misera 15milmil suits you want, but if they're a size too big, and you're never going to get them tailored, or it costs you $150 to get them tailored and they still fit you like crap, what was the point??? If you are buying items for yourself, fit is king kids. Remember, thrift clothing is CHEAP by nature - so if you buy that great tweed jacket which fits great - and hey, maybe it's FUSED but in great shape - when you come across that great vintage Southwick tweed which fits great, you can re-donate your old $7 tweed fused piece of closet filler. Boom.

    Okay, but saying you're not buying for yourself, or you're at an expensive store so even if it fits, you aren't buying it unless it's quality. How do you spot quality? The way most people start is by identifying some top tier brands, and then seeking this out. I would argue that this is not only ineffective, but results in people missing some great merchandise. There is a chance if you are just now getting into the thrift game, maybe you don't know what high end clothing looks like, feels like, etc. So this is what you need to do: pick the nicest retailer of men's clothing in your city, go into the store, and look at the expensive shit. Touch it, look how the buttonholes look, see what a canvassed jacket feels like, determine the difference between machine stitching on the collar padding and hand stitching looks like. Once you have felt and seen quality pieces of clothing, the difference becomes bold and immediate.

    These items will JUMP OFF THE RACK AT YOU. I can literally walk down a rack of jackets, and just by touching the sleeve or looking at the front of the jacket I can determine in a second whether it's worth a damn. You will not learn this skill by memorizing brands, but only by making yourself well acquainted with what makes a piece of clothing nice, and what it feels like. Example of why this is important: Yesterday, I found 3 H. Freeman suits (not Hickey Freeman, IMO H.Freeman are actually nicer - fully canvassed, some handwork, etc.). However, these had all the manufacturer tags removed. If I had just been "tag shopping", I would have passed these over in a second. Instead, I immediately noticed how nice the fabric was, the handsewn lapel buttonhole, etc. and located a tag hidden beyond an inside pocket in the pants. Score!


    Also, lots of stuff out there made by expensive brands, is total garbage. RLPL shirts made in China? Yes sir, they are out there, and they feel like crap. They are not special. Scott Barber shirts that are dime a dozen and have no resale are better buys than MiC RLPL shirts. Will the RLPL shirt still fetch $30 used on ebay? Sure. This is why you have to identify your goals. There are also lots of great, high quality vintage pieces and custom pieces that will NOT bring a dime on Ebay. These are best sold on Styleforum, but until you get some experience you will not have a clue what these items are.

    So basically: Disregard brands. Look for the hallmarks of quality clothing. And reap the rewards.


    Ghostface Killa speaks, therefore, you must listen
     


  7. frenchy

    frenchy In Time Out

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    OK GUYS, BECAUSE I AM TIRED OF READING THIS SHIT: Here is the way to find out what is a WORTH BUYING IN A THRIFT STORE.

    There are 2 ways to identify a quality item in a thrift store: by the brand, or BY KNOWING IT'S NICE BECAUSE YOU HAVE AN EXPERIENCED HAND AND EYE!

    But first we need to figure something out: are you buying items to resell, or are you buying them for yourself? If you're buying it for yourself, then fit is king. Unless you have a great tailor, or a cheap tailor, you should be focusing on items that fit you, or are pretty damn close. You can buy all the awesome Zegna su Misera 15milmil suits you want, but if they're a size too big, and you're never going to get them tailored, or it costs you $150 to get them tailored and they still fit you like crap, what was the point??? If you are buying items for yourself, fit is king kids. Remember, thrift clothing is CHEAP by nature - so if you buy that great tweed jacket which fits great - and hey, maybe it's FUSED but in great shape - when you come across that great vintage Southwick tweed which fits great, you can re-donate your old $7 tweed fused piece of closet filler. Boom.

    Okay, but saying you're not buying for yourself, or you're at an expensive store so even if it fits, you aren't buying it unless it's quality. How do you spot quality? The way most people start is by identifying some top tier brands, and then seeking this out. I would argue that this is not only ineffective, but results in people missing some great merchandise. There is a chance if you are just now getting into the thrift game, maybe you don't know what high end clothing looks like, feels like, etc. So this is what you need to do: pick the nicest retailer of men's clothing in your city, go into the store, and look at the expensive shit. Touch it, look how the buttonholes look, see what a canvassed jacket feels like, determine the difference between machine stitching on the collar padding and hand stitching looks like. Once you have felt and seen quality pieces of clothing, the difference becomes bold and immediate.

    These items will JUMP OFF THE RACK AT YOU. I can literally walk down a rack of jackets, and just by touching the sleeve or looking at the front of the jacket I can determine in a second whether it's worth a damn. You will not learn this skill by memorizing brands, but only by making yourself well acquainted with what makes a piece of clothing nice, and what it feels like. Example of why this is important: Yesterday, I found 3 H. Freeman suits (not Hickey Freeman, IMO H.Freeman are actually nicer - fully canvassed, some handwork, etc.). However, these had all the manufacturer tags removed. If I had just been "tag shopping", I would have passed these over in a second. Instead, I immediately noticed how nice the fabric was, the handsewn lapel buttonhole, etc. and located a tag hidden beyond an inside pocket in the pants. Score!


    Also, lots of stuff out there made by expensive brands, is total garbage. RLPL shirts made in China? Yes sir, they are out there, and they feel like crap. They are not special. Scott Barber shirts that are dime a dozen and have no resale are better buys than MiC RLPL shirts. Will the RLPL shirt still fetch $30 used on ebay? Sure. This is why you have to identify your goals. There are also lots of great, high quality vintage pieces and custom pieces that will NOT bring a dime on Ebay. These are best sold on Styleforum, but until you get some experience you will not have a clue what these items are.

    So basically: Disregard brands. Look for the hallmarks of quality clothing. And reap the rewards.


    he speaks the "troof' well said...so should i pick up the Dockers pants i saw or not?[​IMG]
     


  8. Achilles_

    Achilles_ Senior member

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    he speaks the "troof' well said...so should i pick up the Dockers pants i saw or not?[​IMG]

    Proxy for me?
     


  9. catside

    catside Senior member

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    FYI: Look at my ebay auctions: http://shop.ebay.com/crazearcade/m.h..._from=&_ipg=25

    See those hideous sweaters? I was just offered $1,100 for all 4 of them. If you see old RL sweaters with big images on them, BUY THEM.


    Sell, sell, sell!
     


  10. catside

    catside Senior member

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    OK GUYS, BECAUSE I AM TIRED OF READING THIS SHIT: Here is the way to find out what is a WORTH BUYING IN A THRIFT STORE. There are 2 ways to identify a quality item in a thrift store: by the brand, or BY KNOWING IT'S NICE BECAUSE YOU HAVE AN EXPERIENCED HAND AND EYE! But first we need to figure something out: are you buying items to resell, or are you buying them for yourself? If you're buying it for yourself, then fit is king. Unless you have a great tailor, or a cheap tailor, you should be focusing on items that fit you, or are pretty damn close. You can buy all the awesome Zegna su Misera 15milmil suits you want, but if they're a size too big, and you're never going to get them tailored, or it costs you $150 to get them tailored and they still fit you like crap, what was the point??? If you are buying items for yourself, fit is king kids. Remember, thrift clothing is CHEAP by nature - so if you buy that great tweed jacket which fits great - and hey, maybe it's FUSED but in great shape - when you come across that great vintage Southwick tweed which fits great, you can re-donate your old $7 tweed fused piece of closet filler. Boom. Okay, but saying you're not buying for yourself, or you're at an expensive store so even if it fits, you aren't buying it unless it's quality. How do you spot quality? The way most people start is by identifying some top tier brands, and then seeking this out. I would argue that this is not only ineffective, but results in people missing some great merchandise. There is a chance if you are just now getting into the thrift game, maybe you don't know what high end clothing looks like, feels like, etc. So this is what you need to do: pick the nicest retailer of men's clothing in your city, go into the store, and look at the expensive shit. Touch it, look how the buttonholes look, see what a canvassed jacket feels like, determine the difference between machine stitching on the collar padding and hand stitching looks like. Once you have felt and seen quality pieces of clothing, the difference becomes bold and immediate. These items will JUMP OFF THE RACK AT YOU. I can literally walk down a rack of jackets, and just by touching the sleeve or looking at the front of the jacket I can determine in a second whether it's worth a damn. You will not learn this skill by memorizing brands, but only by making yourself well acquainted with what makes a piece of clothing nice, and what it feels like. Example of why this is important: Yesterday, I found 3 H. Freeman suits (not Hickey Freeman, IMO H.Freeman are actually nicer - fully canvassed, some handwork, etc.). However, these had all the manufacturer tags removed. If I had just been "tag shopping", I would have passed these over in a second. Instead, I immediately noticed how nice the fabric was, the handsewn lapel buttonhole, etc. and located a tag hidden beyond an inside pocket in the pants. Score! Also, lots of stuff out there made by expensive brands, is total garbage. RLPL shirts made in China? Yes sir, they are out there, and they feel like crap. They are not special. Scott Barber shirts that are dime a dozen and have no resale are better buys than MiC RLPL shirts. Will the RLPL shirt still fetch $30 used on ebay? Sure. This is why you have to identify your goals. There are also lots of great, high quality vintage pieces and custom pieces that will NOT bring a dime on Ebay. These are best sold on Styleforum, but until you get some experience you will not have a clue what these items are. So basically: Disregard brands. Look for the hallmarks of quality clothing. And reap the rewards.
    Save this. We'll use it next month again. There was also the principles of thrifting by EBTX few hundred pages back. The one that goes with "you can not will a shoe to fit".
     


  11. k4lnamja

    k4lnamja Senior member

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    Sell, sell, sell!

    I wonder if he knows those are collectors items. I'm serious.

    Cheers
     


  12. catside

    catside Senior member

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    ^Oh, he knows. I'm serious!
     


  13. Nataku

    Nataku Senior member

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    I've read the entire thread from pg 400 onwards now. No post has talked about the quality of the brands I just asked about with the exception being the occasional remark with regards to a pickup. I have learned a great deal w/regards to other brands etc., canvassing, identifying cordovan shoes... I was just looking to fill a couple of gaps that were missing from reading the thread. I did not pm you what to look out for generally other than clothing, perhaps you have me confused with someone else? Either way, thank you k4lnamja.
    All of these have been covered many times in specific threads on Style Forum in the Men's Clothing Section.
    OK GUYS, BECAUSE I AM TIRED OF READING THIS SHIT: Here is the way to find out what is a WORTH BUYING IN A THRIFT STORE. There are 2 ways to identify a quality item in a thrift store: by the brand, or BY KNOWING IT'S NICE BECAUSE YOU HAVE AN EXPERIENCED HAND AND EYE! ................................................. ............................................................................. ......................................................................................................... So basically: Disregard brands. Look for the hallmarks of quality clothing. And reap the rewards.
    A big +1. Someone had to say it. I would passed right on over the two Adrian Jules MTM jackets I recently picked up if I was searching for labels. The handwork and super recent styling jumped out at me. It was like spoting a diamond in a pile of dirty rocks.
     


  14. ruben

    ruben Senior member

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    It's not just old polo sweaters with big things on them.
    Sweatshirts, anything with the polo bear on it, old windbreakers etc etc.

    I kinda get it, because there is has been some amazing Polo products put out over the years (jamgood over at aaac use to post the best of it), but why people are so crazy about the bears....
     


  15. SnarlPatrick

    SnarlPatrick Senior member

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    FYI: Look at my ebay auctions: http://shop.ebay.com/crazearcade/m.h..._from=&_ipg=25

    See those hideous sweaters? I was just offered $1,100 for all 4 of them. If you see old RL sweaters with big images on them, BUY THEM.


    Wow. Those Bear sweaters are UG-LEE. I'll be keeping an eye out for similar ones though. Big money big money.
     


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