The official thrift/discount store bragging thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by j, Mar 2, 2005.

Tags:
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Achilles_

    Achilles_ Senior member

    Messages:
    3,319
    Likes Received:
    50
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Location:
    Omaha


    Plaid ties seem to kind of be a "hipsterish" item, but I like them (especially if you are younger)

    Details on the 16.5 zegna? I am interested :)
     


  2. Achilles_

    Achilles_ Senior member

    Messages:
    3,319
    Likes Received:
    50
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Location:
    Omaha
    

    Damn, it's on oxygen too. This means there will be even more crazy ladies (who have nothing better to do) heading to that goodwill we both know and love :facepalm:
     


  3. ebw1

    ebw1 Senior member

    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2011
    Location:
    Bay Area
    Yeah, they are a bit, but these were a couple bucks each and made in Scotland, so how can you go wrong?

    Got someone interested in the 16.5 Zegna, but 24 p2p, 36 sl, 22 yoke.
     


  4. grendel

    grendel Senior member

    Messages:
    2,672
    Likes Received:
    128
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2011
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    These get a lot of attention... I sold one on eBay and one to a guy on another board and had someone wanting the 3rd I had which I kept for myself.
     


  5. Klobber

    Klobber Senior member

    Messages:
    2,272
    Likes Received:
    88
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    As Man of Lint said earlier, and now with that show for professional flippers (aka storage wars for thrift stores without the auction), our favorite thrift stores are going to be picked clean. Those of us that work 8 - 9 hours a day wont be able to compete with a bored house wife/husband who can visit those stores at any time of their choosing. I predict within 2 years, thrift store finds will be constrained to Criketeer, Oscar De La Renta, Jos A Bank, Gottshalks, Claiborne, Haggar, Stafford, H&M, and other favourites like these. Any other brands I miss that will soon become our only finds (the more common ones we all flip through hurriedly)?



    I saw a bunch of them in Saks today, and occasionally see them thrifting. I suppose those that flip finds, a RG in good condition is worth more on the Bay than a nice second hand Borrelli :facepalm:.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2012


  6. w00tah

    w00tah Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2007
    

    What do you mean, those are the brands that you're supposed to get. ;)
    And we cant forget our favorite Hart Schafner Marx suits.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2012


  7. jrd617

    jrd617 Senior member

    Messages:
    14,723
    Likes Received:
    2,328
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    I think all you thrifters should give up and bury your heads in the sand. You can't win at thrifting against the mighty Oxygen Nation.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2012


  8. Pawz

    Pawz Senior member

    Messages:
    559
    Likes Received:
    33
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2009
    Location:
    *taps your shoulder*
    And we cant forget our favorite Hart Schafner Marx suits.

    And Izod. I see SO many of those! :p
     


  9. lastdonb

    lastdonb Senior member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    13
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2011
    Location:
    Arizona
    One that throws me is the "Made in Italy" pants waistband, but then it's from Kirkland!

    And did everybody in my city buy three pairs of dockers and then donate them?
     


  10. Henry Boogers

    Henry Boogers Senior member

    Messages:
    1,438
    Likes Received:
    23
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    

    I wouldn't have believed it had I not experienced it for myself.
     


  11. GMMcL

    GMMcL Senior member

    Messages:
    4,735
    Likes Received:
    8,784
    Joined:
    May 26, 2011
    
    I suspect the impact of this will be less severe and shorter lived than most of us are nervous about. There are several mitigating factors. First: The show will (at least initially) be on Oxygen and, as some have already observed, I don't know what their viewership is. Second: It's the economy. This is just the latest in a long line of escapism/get rich quick salves for an economically strained public. Eventually, this fad will pass, just as there are no longer all-night dancing contests or shows about house flipping. As the economy improves, as folks try their hand and get stung because they learn their perceived-high-value items won't sell (which I obviously have no knowledge of.... [uncomfortable cough]), and as the general national consciousness turns to a different get rich quick scheme, those who are serious about the hobby will remain and those who are not will not. (NOTE: I include, of course, myself here) Third: Impact will be market specific. In markets where the economic strain is most painful, the alure will be felt greatest; in "recovered" or stronger markets, the deterrent of used clothes is probably still too strong. But, of course, in these markets, the gravitational pull of thrifting has already been present and driven people to thrift anyway, so query how great that additional impact will be. Fourth: As a business, this is neither high profit nor low risk. As others on this thread are far better positioned to instruct: One must have a firm grasp of both quality and salability (which are non-equivalents, BTW). It's pretty easy to lose a good deal of money fairly quickly and end up with a closet full of clothing in sizes other than your own and that nobody wants to buy. Do that a few times when your whole goal was to get rich quick and you won't go back to the well. Those with true staying power do this because they a) love clothes; b) love the thrill of treasure hunting; c) are perennially cheap; d) like the idea of giving quality garments a second chance at life (see also b)); or e) all of the above. One might supsect that the greatest danger of the show would be educating folks -- whether already inclined to thrift or otherwise -- what to look for in terms of quality and salability. Leaving aside the general availability of this thread, I actually think this risk is strongly mitigated by the trademark issue: I doubt very much the show will get permission to use brand names (do you think Brioni, Kiton, Isaia or any other high end manufacturer will grant permission for a show to reveal their goods can be found at miniscule percentages of their retail cost?) I suppose the show's participants could describe handwork and other hallmarks of quality. But as we all know, that's a skill that takes some practice mastering. So I'm not sure how "educational" the show will be. So, on balance, I think the impact will be modest and relatively short-lived. Perhaps the greatest danger is that it may inform thrift managers on how to price their goods. But as Branpore has already observed, those folks either don't pay attention or don't care (or both). Moreover, trying to control the uncrontrollable is like bridling a whale with a rubber harness, or trying to possess the power of the ocean by taking a handfull of water: a futile effort. The hobby will evolve as it will evolve. In fact, it may be that the impact of the show is to GROW demand for high end clothes that we find, or to drive people here to share their finds with us (rather than let them fall into the abyss of car-washing rags or other abuse and misuse of quality garments). To paraphrase, I believe, John Lennon: Life's what happens when you're waiting for life to start. FWIW, my 2 cents. I'm on a thrifting hiatus, so I have nothing exciting to share. :brick:
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012


  12. GMMcL

    GMMcL Senior member

    Messages:
    4,735
    Likes Received:
    8,784
    Joined:
    May 26, 2011


  13. mexicutioner

    mexicutioner Senior member

    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    181
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    Location:
    CA all day
    re: the upcoming thrifter nation shitstorm: you guys realize this very thread will likely help to educate these people, right?

    to our future XX chromosone overlords browsing this thread from the comfort of your iPad 5: welcome. :worship:
     


  14. mexicutioner

    mexicutioner Senior member

    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    181
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    Location:
    CA all day
    

    i'm not a trademark lawyer, but i don't think that's how trademark law works. i think the reason shows don't feature brands is to avoid giving out free publicity (which would diminish what they can demand for product placement) and not because the brand-owner stops them via trademark infringement lawsuit threats. anyone who isn't talking out of his ass care to chime in?

    on a related note, how many other damned lawyers are in this thread? AndroFan outed himself, and i think a couple of dudes mentioned being in law school.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012


  15. Brianpore

    Brianpore B&S (BS) ambassador-in-chief

    Messages:
    7,321
    Likes Received:
    2,676
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2010
    Location:
    NJ
    Quote:
    IMO thirifting is the complete opposite. It is high profit and low risk. The main factor for me (and I'm guessing a lot of people here) from thrifting more is TIME. And yes, depending on how you value your time, it could cost a lot of money=time. Besides from that I have never bought anything I 100% knew I could not sell and break even on/make a profit on. $1-5 Brooks Brothers Shirts, $10 shoes, under $20 suits, etc etc. I knew I would not lose money, but I only shop true thrift store. If you start getting into consignment shops, that is not thrifting anymore in my eyes and the risk goes way up as the prices go way up. Any business with a 100-3000% markup is high profit in my book, but it just depends how much time and effort you want to put into it. If you go full time thrifting 8 hours a day/ 5,6,7 days a week and your wife/girlfriend takes pictures and lists stuff I'm sure this could be a full time family business grossing $60-80K/year.

    +1 I'm no lawyer but you see the guys on storage wars find "name brand" stuff all the time. What about those Big E jeans that Jarrod and Brandi found? I remember seeing the show...not sure if they showed the "tag" but they described them and if anyone was watching just had to pop onto google to get more info.... so what if they dont show the Oxxford or Brioni suit tag... pop onto ebay or google and anyone who's going to hit the thrift stores has one more name brand added to the list.

    That all being said. I highly doubt this is going to have an impact...at least on me. there's nothing here in NJ to worth even thrifting (aka all you guys stay away) [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by