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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. starro

    starro Senior member

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    The only other organic line I'm aware of is: Springyard Shoe Therapy. Mentioned in this blog post: http://shoegazing.se/english/2016/09/15/report-from-shoegazing-super-trunk-show/. No experience with this whatsoever.

    I can tell you the GlenKaren has both cream and wax in the colors you want. And I believe it's got a EU distributor as well. Highly recommended around here.
     
  2. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    I am also very sensitive to any products the contain turpentine, which a lot of mainstream creams do. I have an allergic response to them.

    You could go down another route with products such as Oliver Sweeney's 'Brush Up' or Renapur. They are made of the following:

    Renapur
    Beeswax, Carnauba wax, Jojoba oil and Avocado oil

    Brush up
    Beeswax, Carnuba wax, Lanolin, Sea Buckthorn oil and Neatsfoot oil

    I am particularly fond of Renapur, when I am in a hurry. I use the smallest amount of it on my finger and quickly wipe it all round the shoe. There is no need to brush afterwards and the shoe looks great. I think that everyone should have a pot of this. It lasts for years and will stay 'fresh' for up to five years, without the cap on it, according to the people who make it.

    With all good wishes,
    Munky
     
  3. Count de Monet

    Count de Monet Senior member

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    Nick's point up thread about AE's emphasis on receafting strikes me as correct. Their CEO has stated their biggest competitors aren't other Goodyear welted or Blake-rapid shoe companies but rather those selling cement made throw away shoes. If one of your selling points distinguishing your product from those cheaper competitors is that the life of the shoes can be extended by resoleing, it is in your interest to make sure someone is available to do it. Sadly, the number of competent cobblers in small to medium sized towns in the US has shrunk considerably.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2016
  4. Nick V.

    Nick V. Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    ]I don't know anything -nor- have heard any feedback about Santoni's re-crafting service. In fact I've need seen a job they did. Not even aware of their pricing......
     
  5. TexasTexter

    TexasTexter Senior member

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    Guys, I am having an issue. When I use Saphir Renovatuer the shoes come out opaque looking. Why? Very dull finish. What am I doing wrong?
     
  6. ace13x

    ace13x Senior member

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    Its not a polish. You have to follow up with polish or wax.
     
  7. rbhan12

    rbhan12 Senior member

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    You need to brush it after it dries (3-5 minutes).
     
  8. TexasTexter

    TexasTexter Senior member

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    I put on some Allen Edmonds Carnuba in brown on them but I am wanting a mirror finish. How do I accomplish this? How do I burnish with two colors?
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2016
  9. ace13x

    ace13x Senior member

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    For a mirror finish you have to use water. Follow this guide (though with new shoes you can generally skip the stripping steps):

    http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/polish-your-shoes-properly

    and watch this video:



    The guide mentions beeswax/turpentine wax. Its true, that its easier to achieve with that type of wax, but I've done it with the AE carnauba wax. These are a pair of AE Fairgates in Merlot (crappy indoor lighting) and AE Carnauba burgundy wax.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As you can see in the second picture they need a touch up. I haven't tried buffing with a nylon yet. That might be enough to bing them back without adding another layer.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  10. daamiso

    daamiso Member

    Messages:
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    So im really confused now. to much shoe care products

    I found some natural products from
    Otter wax
    Armstrongs all natural

    But i dont get it how for instance saddle soap from otter wax contains bees wax but sadle soap is a cleaner how can the conditioner get in the leather if there is wax in the soap wont that make a layer so the conditioner wont penetrate.

    Would it even be bad for the shoes if you clean them with oliv oil soap and then condition them with coconut oil and then put bees wax on them for the protection layer. Are the extra ingredients even necessary

    I just dont get it why so many companies put in so much cemicals in there.


    Ou and is it really Necessary to use the same color polish or cream as the shoe what happens if you just use neutral on all of the diferent

    Sorry for my english

    Thx for the help

    Mike
     
  11. ace13x

    ace13x Senior member

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    Think of saddle soap like Dove soap or any moisturizing facial soap. The surfactants are mild, and their primary purpose is to carry away the grime, while still leaving a layer of emulsified oils behind.

    The "chemicals" are used because they serve a purpose. Typically theyvwork better than other substances ir they keep the cost of the product at a particular price point.

    Neutral waxes tend to yellow or become cloudy over time.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2016
  12. tropics

    tropics Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    my mildly neglected alden chukkas always seem dry in the creases.
    i hit them up with reno every few months, and the last few times i tried a coat of lexol.
    any other suggestions?
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2016
  13. ClosetEvolution

    ClosetEvolution Senior member

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    @tropics
    Try stripping them with Renomat or the like and building up a new coat of polish.
     
  14. gsgleason

    gsgleason Senior member

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    Lexol is the correct solution. Renovateur doesn't provide that much conditioning. You can be a little more liberal with the Lexol that you probably think.

    Don't strip them like the other bloke says.

    Keep in mind this is just what shell does some times. The rolls get rough and bloomy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2016
    3 people like this.
  15. Megakurth

    Megakurth Member

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    Has anyone had the opportunity to try the new Saphir Mirror Gloss Wax Polish yet?
     
  16. ClosetEvolution

    ClosetEvolution Senior member

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    I missed that they were shell.
     
  17. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    In my experience and other's, Saphir Renovateur needs to be brushed very soon after applied, or it is hard to buff out. 5 minutes is too long. I have found once it is applied, I start brushing it out right away and get great results. Letting it over dry is bad news bears.
     
  18. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Never heard of it, but I would imagine it is just a higher % of carnauba, which is the hardest wax and leads to a faster mirror shine. The downfall of such proportions of carnauba is if something strikes the mirror shine it tends "shatter" the wax. This means you have to strip it and reapply. I find that Saphir regular wax is great for mirror shining because it stays flexible and if something strikes it it will just put the surface in that spot and not shatter. Also, I have found that leaving the life off of Saphir wax for a while to let the turpentine evaporate out helps for mirror shining with it because the wax is drier.

    Again, I am just speculating about this new product.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. cypi2

    cypi2 Senior member

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    1 person likes this.
  20. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    Location:
    NBPT, MA
    My interest in quality footwear coupled with an appreciation for vintage and antique items has led to a small collection of shoemaker's and cobbler's items. Around the turn of the last century Massachusetts was the shoe making capital of the world (http://news.wgbh.org/post/how-lynn-became-shoe-capitol-world). As a result of all that shoe making history it's common the find these items at our local flea markets and antique shops.

    For instance, in 1899 United Shoe Machinery Co. (USMC) was formed after the merger of the Goodyear Machinery Company, Consolidated Hand Lasting Machine Company, and McKay Shoe Machinery Company. USMC employed thousands in the shoe making industry all over MA. They even built the first skyscraper in Boston in the 30's.

    I'm always on the lookout for USM/USMC's unique logo and have found crates, hand tools, etc. in my travels and on ebay. It's funny that much of the shoe making ephemera on ebay is from little towns all over New England.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    These lasting pliers by J. Nibb (top) and R. Timmins & Sons both made their way from Birmingham England to New England sometime in the last century.

    [​IMG]


    I just started posting these on my IG if interested:

    https://www.instagram.com/patrick_byr/
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2016
    8 people like this.

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