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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. gyasih

    gyasih Senior member

    Messages:
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    Hi gents,

    This thread has been great. I am wondering is there a way to remove this, what appears to be oxidized glue?

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    1 person likes this.
  2. stephenaf2003

    stephenaf2003 Senior member

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    Location:
    Northern VA
    True story.

    I leave the house a few weeks ago and get in the slug line, (DC folks know what that is), as I'm waiting for a ride a surprise rain storm comes and, of course I've got my shell long wings on. Anywho, I finally get in to the Pentagon and my shoes are a disaster. So, I stop by the shoe shine stand, yep I hear all of you saying uhoh, I ask the guy do you know how to care for shell cordovan? He says sure have a seat. I sit down, pull out my phone and start to read the day's news. I glance down just in time to catch him slathering kiwi cordovan polish all over the top of the left shoe. Of course I go, what are you doing? He stops and says you said you wanted cordovan polish. The guy had no idea what shell cordovan was. Needless to say, my cognac shells are ruined in terms of coloring. Hard lesson learned; oh well. The silver lining is, they were my first foray into shell, so at least they're only Meermen's.
     
  3. M635Guy

    M635Guy Senior member

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    They shouldn't be ruined. You'll have to work a bit, but should be able to recover. I'll let the much-more-experienced folks here give you details on the process, but I'm pretty sure you'll get them back.

    One thing I will say is the first thing you have to do for your shoes (leather, shell, whatever) get wet is to allow them to dry naturally (i.e. don't put them on a vent or whatever) and dry 100%. I think most of the time you're going to find that all you need to do is brush and maybe condition them a bit (unless salt/etc. is involved).
     
  4. stephenaf2003

    stephenaf2003 Senior member

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    Northern VA
    

    Thx, I didn't mean I think the shoes are ruined, just the beautiful cognac color they were before he severely darkened them. If anyone has ideas how I can get that color back I'd be grateful.
     
  5. concealed

    concealed Senior member

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    Worthwhile to get special trees for boots or should I just continue using the standard cedar shoe trees? Alden Indys and a cap toe pair of Aldens (TSM Bootmaker edition), for what its worth.
     
  6. irbe

    irbe Senior member

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    Any advice on what to to do with paint chipping in my exposed metal eyelets?
     
  7. M635Guy

    M635Guy Senior member

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    I use the Woodlore Epic trees - they work great. If you're patient you can usually get them from Massdrop for a good price (about $40 for 2 pairs delivered)
     
  8. mreams99

    mreams99 Senior member

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    I accidentally stripped the paint from my eyelets when refinishing a pair of shoes. They were Red Wings, and my local RW store replaced them with brass eyelets for me.
     
  9. irbe

    irbe Senior member

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    For me no such luck as they are Alden. I think replacing the eyelets would be a little too costly.
     
  10. mreams99

    mreams99 Senior member

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    My local RW store didn't charge me a dime.
     
  11. irbe

    irbe Senior member

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    Here in Canada, no RW, plus they aren't RW, they are Alden's. I don't see why they would change them for me when they aren't even the same brand
     
  12. mreams99

    mreams99 Senior member

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    Sorry. I should have been more clear in what I was trying to say:
    It wasn't a difficult job for them. Even if they had charged me, it would not have been very expensive.
    So I'm just trying to say that replacing the eyelets may be a reasonably priced option.
     
  13. Nick V.

    Nick V. Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Use fingernail polish. Carefully apply. Two coats should do it.
     
  14. irbe

    irbe Senior member

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    Thanks was also hear Enamel paint might work. I'm guessing it's better to go over all of the eyelets even the ones that aren't chip to ensure they look uniform ?
     
  15. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    Enamel will work but wont last as long as the finger nail polish !!! Preferably use the semi permanent nail polish but you ll need a uv light to make it polymerize ( a lot tougher than both of the previous , i have used all of them due to scale modeling)
     
  16. davidVC

    davidVC Well-Known Member

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    From what I know (there have been previous posts on the topic), Alden puts acrylic on the Shell to give it a high gloss. By using the deer bone, you are likely removing the glossy acrylic. I have never used a deer bone but along with the oils it has, I believe its like using a ultra fine grit sandpaper on the leather. The Shell is likely fine. I would do both boots. You don't need the acrylic.
     
  17. davidVC

    davidVC Well-Known Member

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    From what I know (there have been previous posts on the topic), Alden puts acrylic on the Shell to give it a high gloss. By using the deer bone, you are likely removing the glossy acrylic. I have never used a deer bone but along with the oils it has, I believe its like using a ultra fine grit sandpaper on the leather. The Shell is likely fine. I would do both boots. You don't need the acrylic.
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Also those deer bones are coated in some sort of oil. It could be the oil giving the matte appearance. The deer bone thing is bullshit really. It is only good for smoothing bumps, and cuts, and swells due to water penetration in the fibers. Also, you can use anything smooth to do the same thing.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. irbe

    irbe Senior member

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    Thanks I will look into that
     
  20. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

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    Newcastle, UK
    Alden puts acrylic on the surface? Isn't that basically the "corrected grain" process they use on low grade calf skin?

    Do the other manufacturers do this on shell cordovan?
     

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