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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. MansardRoof

    MansardRoof Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2016
    Thanks for the response rbhan. That's a reasonable theory about the medallion holes but I've tried both methods: damp cloth and dipping the finger. If I could just see some sort of progress, I would keep going but after two hours of with polishing with no discernible difference, i'm starting to get frustrated.

    How much wax should i be applying each round? I'm using an amount equal to half a grain of rice.
     
  2. MansardRoof

    MansardRoof Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2016
    All the videos I've seen they dab the water then start polishing immediately. I guess I could try letting the wax sit for a bit.
     
  3. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    You don't have to use water initially.

    Also, creating a mirror shine takes significantly more wax for the first time after you stripped away all the waxes.

    Let the wax sit/settle for a day and add more wax polish.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

    Messages:
    297
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Location:
    Newcastle, UK
    Not worth of a new thread, but I wanted to ask you fine people whether anyone here know about Barker NOVAs?

    I just picked some up on eBay going REALLY cheap and I wanted to learn a little more about them. I've seen quite a few NOVAs listed on eBay previously, so they must have been common at some stage.

    In particular,
    Rough date? '80s? 90s?
    Bookbinder/coated leather?
    Made in UK?
    Was NOVA their budget range? I dont think its just a model name.
    etc.

    Pics:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. benhour

    benhour Senior member

    Messages:
    644
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    Location:
    Athens
    You have to see if it is alcohol based or the primary solvent in it!!

    https://www.shoecaresupplies.com/Shoe_Dye_p/angelus-leather-dye.htm

    If you have used this one (and not the acrylic one) alcohol ll do the trick for you and you ll be able to clean the soles ! (try not to spill any drop of alcohol on the leather or it ll create spot stains!!

    I hope i helped you a little![​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2016
  6. atia2

    atia2 Senior member

    Messages:
    405
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    

    They look like glued-on soles (as I doubt they are closed channel). That, along with the suspicious range name, suggests this was a low-quality offering from Barker.
     
  7. dpbiii

    dpbiii New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2016
    Hi all,

    I'm a long time lurker but this is my first post. I'm hoping you sartorial chaps can either help or allay my fears.

    I was just doing a spit shine to my Barker brogues (which I've done countless times with my other black and brown shoes) and as I was polishing the right shoe it appeared that some moisture began spreading from the brogue holes (please correct me if these have a special name).

    Anyway the moisture marks are quite apparent and frankly rather ugly and for some reason the same effect food not appear despite the exact sane treatment to the left shoe.

    Can anyone tell me if this is normal, is there something that can be done or is this pair now a write off?

    Thank you for any assistance you can provide!

    Cheers,
    Dpbiii [​IMG]
     
  8. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

    Messages:
    297
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Location:
    Newcastle, UK
    Looks a little strange to me. Is that definately just water, or did you apply any solvents or stripping agents before you started?
     
  9. dpbiii

    dpbiii New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2016
    
    Nothing but water and polish.

    I know, never seen it before. It's dried out now but it's absent of polish on those spots. Starting to get concerned as they're one of my new favourites.
     
  10. jet-stream

    jet-stream Senior member

    Messages:
    397
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2015
    *** Cross-post from AE Appreciation Thread ***

    How to make cheap shoe trees better (OT)

    I've seen recent discussion of shoe tree sales (such as JAB trees) and thought I would share my modifications to such trees. While I strongly prefer Woodlore Epic trees, they are relatively expensive and I have plenty of JAB tres. To me, the big shortcoming of the JAB and basic woodlore models is the lack of a good handhold. To solve this, I simply added brass knobs to the cheap trees, which magnifies their utility substantially (especially for boots!). If you have a few basic tools, there's not much to get.

    As pictured below, for each pair, you will need:
    - 2x Cabinet knobs (I like brass to match the nicer shoe trees)
    - 2x 8/32 screws, preferably brass, 1/2" in length (5/8 could potentially work but will be hard to get into place). Note: disclaimer below.
    - A tiny Phillips screwdriver (#0 or so) to remove the nameplate
    - An 11/64 drill bit and a driver (you probably could go up to 3/16 if absolutely necessary)
    - (Optional) small needlenose pliers
    [​IMG]

    How to:
    1. Remove the existing nameplates.

    2. Drill a hole on or near the screw hole closest to the front. Take care not to move too far back or you'll get into the area where the shoe tree curves, which means your screw won't be long enough.
    [​IMG]

    3. Feed the screw through the hole from below. Pliers are not essential but will help, especially for those of us with robust fingers.
    [​IMG]

    4. Hold the screw head in place with a finger and thread the knob on top.
    [​IMG]

    5. Place trees in shoes.
    [​IMG]

    That's it. It is pretty quick - I could probably do this for a dozen pairs in the time it will take me to write this post.

    Of note, some of you may be tempted to buy a longer screw (2") and attach the knob near the back of a tree. I do not recommend this, for several reasons:
    - it's more complicated. You will have to drill a countersink and do some sanding. It's even worse if you want to avoid the wood on the bottom splintering.
    - it may get into the heel of the shoe (see below)
    - unless you go really far back on the tree, the spring mechanism is in the way

    Trust me on this. If you don't believe me, post your skepticism and I'll take a photo of why this is a bad idea. The method outlined above puts the knob in a really handy place (especially for boots), and looks fine aesthetically:
    [​IMG]

    As far as process, that's it. A few notes:

    1. Brass screws in this size are readily available at any hardware store or big-box home improvement store, typically about $1.20 for 6 pcs.
    2. TRUST BUT VERIFY: one of the 6 JAB trees I modified had a thick shelf/handhold, and 1/2" screws were not adequate. In this case, I needed a 5/8" screw, which are more difficult to find. I ended up just cutting a longer screw (hint: dremel or similar). The 5/8" will still fit under the handhold, but the pliers become less optional. Moral of the story: measure before purchasing hardware.
    3. If you don't want to shop for just the right knob, I used the cheapest brass knobs I could find on amazon (<$1 each). The specific ones I used are now like $5 each, but this would be pretty much the same thing: http://www.amazon.com/Amerock-BP1910-PB-Allison-Hardware-Polished/dp/B000HAUS9Q/ref=pd_sim_60_2?ie=UTF8&dpID=410WUDdjiwL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR131%2C160_&refRID=0EZ3DF9N9FVFF59KRC1E - note this is an add-on item if you want free shipping (assumes amazon prime). If you get the knobs for this price, the total cost of modifying a pair of trees is <$2.50.

    Hope this helps - enjoy!
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2016
    7 people like this.
  11. maikuraki

    maikuraki Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2009
    These are a pair of Wolverine 1000 miles boots I've been wearing for over 2 years.Please tell me how to fix these.Thanks a lot.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  12. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Conceal and color with shoe cream.
     
  13. San780

    San780 Senior member

    Messages:
    221
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2013
    Hello there,

    I recently came across these nice shoes while thrifting. The problem is that the stitching on the sole seems to be disappearing (with usage over the years of course). These are Goodyear welted shoes and I'm wondering if that means I would have to resole them in the near future (if I buy them of course)?

    Resoling costs quite a bit of money, so I'm trying to work out the price I'm willing to pay for these shoes.

    Any help would be highly appreciated.

    Thank you.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2016
  14. atia2

    atia2 Senior member

    Messages:
    405
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    

    Good DIY. And technically these are now custom shoe trees.
     
  15. M635Guy

    M635Guy Senior member

    Messages:
    2,141
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2015
    That doesn't look bad at all - some color-matched cream and a good brushing will be a good start. Over time it will just blend and become patina ;)
     
  16. M635Guy

    M635Guy Senior member

    Messages:
    2,141
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2015
    Unless the soles themselves are soft (usually near the ball of your foot), I wouldn't worry about it. Wear and enjoy!
     
  17. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,334
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Cheap beater shoes for the rain. Over a year old. Ugly. Never polished or conditioned. Not cracking. Discuss.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Where's the steak?
     
  19. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,334
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
  20. Zapasman

    Zapasman Senior member

    Messages:
    2,115
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2014
    Location:
    España
    Shoes with character; nice patina. Just use a damp cloth to clean them and brush.
     

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