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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. SpooPoker

    SpooPoker Internet Bigtimer and Most Popular Man on Campus Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Just brush it. You will get bald spots eventually.
     
  2. acousticfoodie

    acousticfoodie Senior member

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    Does anyone here waterproof their AEs? I just got my first pair of AEs in the walnut strand and was looking at what I should do before first wear (Have never polished shoes in my life...I know sad). From this forum, I picked up that the steps before first wear are:

    1) clean with cloth
    2) apply conditioner cleaner to cloth and clean again
    3) apply AE waltnut polish
    4) use a dauber to get out polish in the perforation pores
    5) wipe with cloth
    6) go over with horsehair brush
    7) Wipe again
    8) Apply Heel and sole edge dressing (let dry)
    9) Spray on waterproof

    I think my steps 1-8 are correct...but I am confused about #9. People here say waterproofing is important, but AE's youtube channel says to not waterproof because it hurts the leather:

    But then AE offers a waterproof spray themselves! http://www.allenedmonds.com/aeonline/product_6524033_1_40000000001_-1?top_category=216

    Are my steps 1-8 correct? And is it just better to not apply a waterproof spray?

    - confused :-(
     
  3. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    I agree with everything Patrick Booth has to say about Renovator. It's the Swiss army knife of shoe care products and useful for: blending previous coats, re-energizing a tired looking surface, softening the leather and imparting a subtle sheen. I use it often, even under the mirror shine. However, unlike Patrick Booth, I always leave overnight to dry. Also, don't try to buff Reno with a fluffy cloth, as bits of lint will grab and stick. Plain old cotton rag works best here.

    Lear
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2011
  4. thesecondprize

    thesecondprize Senior member

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    I'm no expert, but I believe the general consensus is not to waterproof shoes. In fact, I don't think I've ever seen anyone on SF recommend it.

    Also, the Strand has a leather soles - wet leather soles will wear out many times faster than dry leather soles. So I try to wear leather soles on dry days and rubber soles (or beaters) on rainy days.
     
  5. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Recently via Twitter Ron Rider twatted that he had dinner with the Saphir director a few nights ago and he "had no idea so much technology went into shoe polishes". I would like to see him elaborate on this statement especially since he has revealed so much about Saphir products already. I am curious what new info he got out of him. Below are a few quotes from Ron's website regarding different Saphir products, which is an addition to the years old shoe care write-up that he did that appears in this thread already, (which I also nominate to go into the "Articles - Instructional section on this forum along with Lear's "Way of the Mirror"):

    On Saphir en generale: " I get alot of questions regarding the make-up of the Medaille D’Or products and why they are better than others on the market. I’ll leave the question of ‘better’ for others to decide, but the main difference between Saphir MDO and XXXX is the lack of additives, resins and silicone which can be harmful to leather. They help get a ‘fast’ shine….but are generally not ideal, in our opinion. More importantly, however, is what we add – not subtract. The use of natural ingredients including turpentine, beeswax, carnuba wax, vegetable oils, ox-foot oil, lanolin and mink oil makes for superior conditioning and glossing products that enhance, not cover, the best leathers."

    On Saphir wax polish: "Formulated for ‘glacage’ finishing, this wax is beeswax and turpentine based, with 7 different additional nutrient waxes, including carnuba. The pigments have been selected for their brilliance, tranparency, and clarity. Can be combined to develop a unique patina on high quality leathers."

    On Saphir cream polishes: "The original product of Saphir, this ‘Gold Medal’ cream is turpentine and beeswax based with a complex formula that includes numerous vegetable oils, oxfoot oils, and penetrating pigment that will clean, seal, color and re-nourish fine leathers."

    On Saphir Renovateur: "This is the product that sold me on Saphir MDO in the first place, and continues to be a product that we have a hard time keeping in stock. I started using this in my re-finishing shop and found it to be exceptional for cleaning, conditioning, smoothing, removing loose pigment, polishing…..everything I was looking for in a simple, single product to finish off my work. Have never looked for another – it’s fantastic. As far as I can tell, it takes the same formula as the Creme 1925, removes the pigment and adds a good deal of Mink Oil. A little goes a LONG way and I suggest it to be used alone as a routine maintenance product as well as between coats of cream/wax as a cleaner and conditioner. They won’t give me the formula – as they shouldn’t – but nevermind….it’s the best all-purpose product I have ever used. Also, as I was told just this morning, there is one ingredient that is very difficult to find and production was stopped in France on the Renovateur until this ingredient (the oxfoot oil?? Arnault??)"
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
    2 people like this.
  6. badsha

    badsha Senior member

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    I must not be doing something right. I left Renovator overnight and it became very difficult to remove, almost caked on there. I applied a thin layer with my fingers. Does Renovator remove cream polish?
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
  7. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I have had similar experiences with leaving renovateur on too long. It does act as a solvent to remove old polish such as cream.
     
  8. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Happened to finger on a coat of Reno late last night. The previous state was mirrored on the caps & heels, with a normal high shine elsewhere. I'll do this (Reno) about once a month. Anyway, just buffed with an old cotton handkerchief, then applied an all over 'normal' thin coat of wax and buffed again with cotton handkerchief. Absolutely no deterioration whatsoever. In fact the mirror is already (slightly) visible, with the rest of the shoe looking very shiny indeed.

    Might it be because I'm using cotton and not brushes? In fact, I rarely take brushes to my good shoes anymore (maybe I should). Using cotton does involve more work, but seems to preserve the previous mirror.

    Yes, I realize there's more to life than polishing shoes. Once you get the mirror down though, it's just a couple of minutes per week.

    Lear
     
  9. KitAkira

    KitAkira Senior member

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  10. Louis XIV

    Louis XIV Senior member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  11. NOBD

    NOBD Senior member

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    You forgot the sole edges, Louis...
     
  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    You need Saphir Renovateur, Saphir creame or wax polish and a brush. That is it.
     
  13. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

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    Installed Plastic Tap on a new pair of C&J for BBBF saddles

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    1: apply plastic heel tap
    2: predrill the holes in the shoe going as deep as the screw requires. No more, no less
    3: apply silicon to the opening
    4. screw in the wood screw. I used a 1/2 screw in the heel and a 3/8" screw in the front

    comments and critique welcomed. I wanted to put two screw in the front but the stitching didnt allow for it

    before:
    [​IMG]

    after:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2011
    2 people like this.
  14. NOBD

    NOBD Senior member

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    ^
    I like posts like that. I wonder about the screws you used: won't they rust? And I like old screws better: (-) in stead of (+). (How's that for a nitpick?)
     
  15. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

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    I didnt consider the rust factor until after I put them in. The following day I went to another hardware store where I found the #2 (thinner than 4) flat screws in addition to #2 phillips screws. You can also get treated screws but again, I didnt consider it until afterwards.

    As far as durability goes, I have worn them twice thus far and they are rock solid. They havent budged at all.

    Your nitpick is a worthy one. Why do you prefer flat over phillips? Does it have to do with the G&G/Vass recessed metal toe taps? they use flat screws, no?
     
  16. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Don't know why I'm suddenly double posting -please delete
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2011
  17. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    To answer your question (again), look at these pics I posted a couple of days ago:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The shoes had a fading shine, and needed a monthly Reno and re-mirror.

    So, they were completely coated in a layer of Renovator, and looked as matte as a Teflon coated saucepan in the middle of a Norwegian winter. Not a chink of sparkle coming from any pore of the leather. Left for about 24 hours to completely dry, they were then buffed with a cotton handkerchief. I immediately went from this to what you see in about six coats of Saphir wax polish (6 on toes & just 2 on rest of shoe). But believe me, if I'd also included a single coat of cream polish, the results would've been exactly the same. I'll occasionally include this single layer of cream when I feel the colour needs a little lift.

    What I've found, is that although I'll happily leave Reno to dry overnight, I'll NEVER leave Saphir cream polish to sit for more than 10 -15 minutes. Leave for too long, and it'll set solid around the welts and seams. Could it be your cream polish that has set solid? I simply don't know.

    The above works for me, with photographs as evidence. I use a lot of Reno, and find it compatible with a beautiful mirror. Have you even tried to buff the Reno yet? It'll appear to have set solid, but once you buff it, the shoe will take on a soft sheen. It's after this that the fun starts.

    Lear
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Double post - Please delete
     
  19. Louis XIV

    Louis XIV Senior member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  20. Naka

    Naka Senior member

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    Not patrick, but I usually apply any sort of creme with my fingers as it is easy to wipe off, and you don't waste any of that expensive stuff by soaking a cloth with it. I recall another member applying Renovateur with fingers for that reason aswell. I believe the heat from my hands also helps in evenly distributing the cream.
     

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