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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. thelook

    thelook Active Member

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    I always use paper towel to completely dry the inside of the lid, before replacing it on the tin.
     
  2. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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  3. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Hi Fred. Yes, I recommended Selvyt cloths. One of the useful things about them is that they have a 'smooth' side and a marginally rougher side. The smooth side is good for putting polish on and the other for buffing afterwards. They are 100% cotton. I wait till they are a bit too colourful and pop them in the washing machine. They dry really well and if anything they improve with washing. I also keep horsehair brushes for each colour of shoes. Another cloth that is useful for a final buff is a fine, microfibre one. It is good at bringing up a final shine.
     
  4. Newberry

    Newberry Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Is this creasing on the front of the cap toe of my Park Avenue normal? This is my correct size and I keep them in shoe trees. I also condition and polish them every now and then. So I'm a bit confused...
     
  5. thelook

    thelook Active Member

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    Quote: I have an old pair of bass wingtips. Not long ago they were re-soled. They are burgundy in color and I think if they were re-done from the ground up they could look beautiful. I'd even consider paying someone to to it. But, I'm pretty good at polishing shoes and need the layers of knowledge necessary to do the job correctly. I'll keep nosing around. If anyone else would like to chime in that would be great.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2016
  6. rbhan12

    rbhan12 Senior member

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    That's probably just cracked wax. Might be some creasing there if the toe stiffener doesn't go all the way up to the captoe, but that's perfectly normal.
     
  7. rbhan12

    rbhan12 Senior member

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    Massdrop is having a sale of Saphir Cream Polish and Renovateur. 2 cream polishes for $30, $3.50 shipping to CONUS. Renovateur and Cordovan cream polishes are also available for an extra $2. Go nuts.
     
  8. taxgenius

    taxgenius Senior member

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    Thanks!
     
  9. Newberry

    Newberry Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Thanks for the reply. Also another quick question. Sorry I'm new to AE but is this side creasing normal for the Strand. This is my first time wearing them and I've only worn them for 3 hours so far and not a lot of walking. The other shoe doesn't seem to have this problem. I know these are the right size because I got my foot measured at the store. Thanks!
     
  10. tharkun

    tharkun Senior member

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    No idea if strands somehow are prone to this with your foot form but I've definitely had creasing in all sorts of places before that differ from shoe to shoe. I have so far had 4 different pairs of AE Leeds for example and they all behaved and looked differently in regards to creases. Leather is a natural product too, I.e. different hides or different parts of the hides will behave slightly differently if what I've heard on these forums so far is true.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016
  11. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    This all sounds good to me. Bear in mind that our feet aren't symmetrical, so creasing will not necessarily be the same with each shoe.
     
  12. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    i know exactly what you mean. i have a very long narrow foot and my heel to ball measurement is actually 1 size longer than my overall foot length too. It is common for people like us to try to go down a size to get it to feel like enough room in front of the toes and to feel tight enough on the foot, but that can cause more damage by not having a well fitting shoe.

    it is better to have extra space in front of your shoes and get a narrow width (or add an insole / full sock liner to effectively reduce the internal width / volume) so the ball of your foot meets at the widest part of the shoe. That will allow for adequate bending when walking in them.


    No imagine your problem but being a AAA width on top of it to get the correct size in heel to ball length. That is near impossible, but if I go down a full size it can bring it down to an A width. haha. It still doesn't help much unless I also do double socks (remove another width to put me at around a B) and then a sock liner / insole (now to about a C). That is all of the work needed to get a pair to be close to fitting in normal width and it still is a little wide for me. So trust me, I feel your pain.



    Moral of the story is to make sure that your ball of your foot is at that widest part of the shoe (where the shoe flexes). It is fine to have extra room at the front of your foot. If the shoe is too wide, you can make adjustments or see if a brand will make a more narrow width.

    If you are a wide width, then you can check for the many brands that offer wide width, without needing to go up another size in length.

    Hope that helps.
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    I don't use daubers either. I just use fingers and a cloth because I feel that I get more control as well. Plus that saves me on a lot of dauber brushes that I don't need to buy / use / clean.

    I do use different horse hair brushes. One for black, one for browns, one for burgundy/cordovan/etc. I also have a pig bristle brush for grain leathers and a goat hair for high shines.

    I also have some clean socks that I use for dusting off the shoes if needed.
     
  14. tharkun

    tharkun Senior member

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    I use finger with cloth and or cotton balls for dress shoes. However I apply the black boot dressing for my winter boots with a dauber because its easier, especially down at the stitching of the upper to the sole. With the black boots there's really not much control needed. Just get it on there and cover everything so it's water proof again.
     
  15. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Dry desert humour alert!!

    Daubers are for sissies.

    Flannel PJ's are the ticket. Nothing more honourable than a black or brown finger.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  16. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    If you wake up late and need to polish your shoes quickly, you could do a lot worse than use Saphir Creme Universelle. It is a liquid polish that goes on quickly and which doesn't leaver white marks around broguing. A Fine Par of Shoes suggest you 'polish immediately after application because of rapid solvent evaporation.' The bottle says to leave 5 minutes before polishing. I have tried both and can't see the difference. A great product.
     
  17. Zapasman

    Zapasman Senior member

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    hahaha,

    Well I use dauber brushes to apply bee wax all around the welt and the sole edge. I think they are good too for brogues shoes. I never put any kind of cosmetics directly on my fingers. I will think about using Flannel PJ´s....[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016
  18. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Quite true...and people do obsess about creasing more than is necessary, IMO.

    That said, I was always taught that if the creases are severely angled towards the lateral heel, it is usually a sign that the shoes are too short for the foot. I've seen such creasing and even sporadically questioned the owners of the shoes. But I am pretty careful about HB relationships and have never fit a customer such that angled creases developed...so I can't really confirm it or not.

    edited for punctuation and clarity
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016
  19. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Good post.

    Only one caveat--I would just observe that while adding a 3rd party insole or heavy, full length sock is a common enough way to correct a too large shoe, there is an "orange peel" effect that will change the internal H-B length. People forget (or dismiss) that but it can be critically important.

    Additionally, and all too often, esp. on contemporary RTW, there simply isn't enough height inside the shoe to accommodate both the insole/sock and the toes of the foot. IMO, adding an insole is always a "kludge" and one that is more often than not disappointingly inadequate.

    Sometimes fixes such as this are not really...creating other problems that may actually be more severe, esp. in the long run.

    --
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016
  20. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    I'm loving it. I use undershirts at time too. Or nice socks to cover the fingers but that is the most.
     

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