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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. heelguy

    heelguy Senior member

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  2. shoelover

    shoelover Senior member

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    North Carolina
     
  3. 1up

    1up Senior member

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    I've finally invested in some nice footwear for work and need a starter kit to take care of my shoes.

    Saphir products are regarded as the best, what is the minimum set up that I need to have my bases covered? Most of my shoes are dark brown / mid brown / tan and then some suede ones.

    Is the kirby allison starter saphir kit worth it at $200CAD? Is it over the top?

    Thanks!
     
  4. smoothie1

    smoothie1 Senior member

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    I would recommend choosing two or three colors of wax polish (dark brown, some mid and/or light brown, some neutral perhaps). Two or three creams as well should be selected to match or complement the shoe colors. In addition, you will probably want a cleaner and/or conditoner; here I would go with Bickmore 4.

    I like Saphir wax and creams. Kiwi is fine as well in my experience, as are plenty other makers. You really don't have to spend an arm and a leg on a care kit, although doing so can be fun. Renovateur is nice to have, but it's not necessarily needed regularly. Renomat can also be handy to have, if you are establishing high shines and need to strip and start again on occasion.

    Suede really only requires a suede brush of some sort and water to clean. Suede renovating sprays and nano protectors can be good to keep the wet and dirt off.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  5. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    I have used Renomat on every kind of leather (Veg tanned and chrome tanned more than once on my pairs) and on shoes by most of manufacturers ( 2 pairs of C&J's of a friend ) and hadnt had any issue !! But to be safe thats why i said light passes [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
  6. shoelover

    shoelover Senior member

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    So I bought a pair of older 'Lexington' cap-toe bluchers for the express purpose of experimentation.

    I plan to:

    1. Sand down sole edges and refinish antiqued
    2. Burnishing the heel and toe areas

    My question is, what other things should I consider? Remember, these aren't shoes I wear and really don't ever have to be, so nothing is off the table.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. M635Guy

    M635Guy Senior member

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    A couple questions:

    A guy I know bought some AE McTavishes and has been wearing them a bit heavily (3x a week). He posted a pic and I noticed this:
    [​IMG]

    He says it is clear in person, but neither my pair of McT's (waxed tan and cognac) have anything at the welt stitch at all. It doesn't look like he's cleaning them and they are relatively new (about a month). Thoughts on what this is and what might be done? (I suggested brushing to start)
    Other question: is there any kind of maintenance that is done for the interior leather, specifically at the heel? I'm seeing a bit of wear there, and wondering if I can do anything to extend the life of the leather short of putting some kind of pad there (not thrilled at that concept). I don't have any heel slip that I notice in any of these shoes, I do use a shoe tree, etc. Think I just have pointy heels... :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
  8. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

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    Remember a little while ago I dyed my new pair of cheapy Ikon Oslo boots from tan to dark chocolate brown?-

    [​IMG]

    Well I got bored of the tan of my old pair so I decided to have a go at painting a vintage style patina using a more diluted version of the dye/Lexol mix. What do you think?-
    [​IMG]
     
    5 people like this.
  9. shoelover

    shoelover Senior member

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    I think I need you to do a pair for me!
     
  10. M635Guy

    M635Guy Senior member

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    The vintage job looks great!
     
  11. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

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    It was dead easy!

    Plus, I only used acetone, oil dye and lexol. (Plus some trusty old Saphir cream and wax at the end)

    Give it a go :)
     
  12. shoelover

    shoelover Senior member

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    Latest shoe-care haul.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. shoelover

    shoelover Senior member

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    Lexol or Revenateur?
     
  14. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

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    Me?

    I mixed the dye with Lexol. Lexol penetrates into the leather much deeper than the Renovateur so you get a better take-up. Using neat dye is tricky as is soak straight in and it difficult to control.
     
  15. shoelover

    shoelover Senior member

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    I just bought both products, because I have heard great things about both. I was asking in general what everyone prefers.
     
  16. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

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    I'm a fan of both those products. (I've got some Bick4 on order too)

    Lexol is more penetrating but leaves more of a sticky residue in my experience. If the leather is old and has never been conditioned, I would use some Lexol first. If the leather is generally in good condition I would use Renovateur as its much nicer to work with IMO. I always use a layer of Renovateur on brand new shoes before anything else.

    I end up using Lexol perhaps once a year and Reno about once a month.
     
  17. shoelover

    shoelover Senior member

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    Thanks for the explanation. I used both today and the Lexol seems kinda like what my dad used to put on my ball glove. The Renovator certainly IS easier to work with, but the Lexol seemed to really penetrate my Rutledges. That may be because of the more supple leather, but it made them look very healthy.
     
  18. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    For me, Bick4 replaced both of these products. Much more versatile IMHO.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. smoothie1

    smoothie1 Senior member

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    Bickmore Bick 4 is an excellent product. I use Bick 4 far more often than Lexol. I use Lexol more often than Renovateur. Btw, Renovateur is a cleaner and conditioner, so its effects are a bit different than the others in my experience.

    Lexol is very effective and useful in its own right, but it is not as light or as easy to work wth as Bick 4.

    It's nice to have all three at your disposal.
     
  20. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Renovateur is best used for spit shined toe caps or other high wax polished products.
     

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