1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. 1up

    1up Senior member

    Messages:
    1,096
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver
    You have your answer!
     
  2. Brujo

    Brujo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    86
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2007
    Location:
    Saarlouis
    I've made the best experience to remove oil with sth. like the Terre de Sommières of Avel.

    The left shoe is oiled:

    [​IMG]

    Under the mask

    [​IMG]

    The final result

    [​IMG]
     
    2 people like this.
  3. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

    Messages:
    297
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Location:
    Newcastle, UK
    I have got some cheap tan coloured IKON Chukka boots that are very comfortable.

    I'm keen to recolour them to dark brown or black.

    Would this be possible on this cheap leather? I don't even know if it's corrected grain or anything.

    What exactly would I need in order to re colour these? Which wax stripper and dye would I need to buy to get a good even colour?

    Pics of boot model (not mine);

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

    Messages:
    7,319
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    ^They look pretty good as is, imo, but Fiebings dye should work.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2015
  5. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

    Messages:
    297
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Location:
    Newcastle, UK
    To be honest, I have 2 pairs now as I found a cheap pair online.

    I'm hoping to keep one in their original tan for casual wear and I want a dark pair for business travel in the snow/slush/rain when I wouldn't want to wear an expensive pair.

    If I strip the finish with pure acetone and recolour with black leather dye, are they likely to hold their colour? If I scratched the shoe or got them soaking wet, would I end up with bright tan colour patches?

    I need the finish to be pretty robust.

    EDIT: Also I note that Fiebings do a "Leather Dye (Water based)" and an "Oil dye (for leather". Which woul dgive me the best most robust results for straight black on cheap tan leather?
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2015
  6. mreams99

    mreams99 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,343
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2015
    Location:
    Ohio
    If you want them to be really black, dye them with a coat of navy first, then black.
    I've never used the water-based dyes. I know for certain that the other is quite robust. The dye will penetrate.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. mreams99

    mreams99 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,343
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2015
    Location:
    Ohio
    Can I get some suggestions on how to clean "Acorn Hillfire" leather?
    This is what is used on a pair of my Red Wing boots, and I suspect it may also be used on Allen Edmonds "Acorn Hillfire" Neumoks (for Nordstrom).
     
  8. garland

    garland Senior member

    Messages:
    435
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2014
    Location:
    Nashville
    I used a suede eraser/brush, and then carefully/sparingly apply a conditioner/leather lotion. The lotion definitely darkened the leather, which is what I wanted. Mine got a lot lighter over the last year and a half.
     
  9. mreams99

    mreams99 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,343
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2015
    Location:
    Ohio
    
    Thank you. I almost posted this in the AE thread, but it looks like you've got both of these threads covered!
     
  10. MORI3L

    MORI3L New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2015
    Hi everyone! I recently bought a pair of Ferragamo Python shoes and after applying some conditioner to it, it doesn't look quite as good as it used to. If you look at the first picture (with the belt) you'll notice that the shoes originally had a nice gray suede finish. After applying the conditioner, they're like an olive green and some gray spots.

    I think this happened because i went way too thick with the conditioner. Would it be feasible to wipe the entire surface with a damp cloth in an attempt to remove most of the conditioner and try to get these things back to its original color? Note that I've already let the shoes sit for a couple weeks and they've only marginally improved in color.

    Also, this is the conditoner that i used: http://shop.nordstrom.com/s/cadilla...e=1&siteId=oGj7akNVsTg-NtCcAg1IYDVF3kDdJgguDg


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. DrizztD

    DrizztD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2015
    I have a grease stain from having a fried dumpling dropped on my suede shoe.

    Now it has a darker grease spot on it. What's the best way to remove that?

    I've used saphir suede shampoo once. Should i keep trying that? Maybe vinegar + water?
     
  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,331
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    

    You probably need something to get the grease out. Leather Doctor's Degreaser 2.2 works on suede. I would try that.
     
  13. newp

    newp Senior member

    Messages:
    254
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Hello! Do you usually add anything to Saphir Renovateur treatment for horween shell cordovan? If it's a bone, can you recommend me any good bones to purchase in Europe please (delivery, I live in a small country)?

    Thank you.
     
  14. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior member

    Messages:
    297
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Location:
    Newcastle, UK
    Quick update on this project - the first application of Feibings oil dye is on and I'm pleased with the results so far. I went for "dark chocolate" in the end.

    Question - do I need to add some kind of sealer after my final dye coat?
     
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,331
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    After each thin application and letting it dry I would follow up with some Lexol to remove excess dye and keep them conditioned. After they are where you want them some cream polish followed by wax polish should be good enough.
     
  16. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Don't use Lexol after each coat, it's just going to strip the surface dye away and block the surface away from your next dye application.

    Instead, dilute your dye with Lexol 1:1 or less. It will help bring the dye pigments into the leather and condition at the same time. Buff after every time the diluted dye is dry. Let them sit for a few hours to make sure the color settle otherwise it's very easy to over dye your color.

    Cream and wax seal is more than enough. Even wax alone is enough if you dilute your dye with Lexol.
     
  17. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,331
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Well I've done it before without need to dilute the Lexol. Lexol is mostly water anyway, also if you dilute it be sure to use distilled water as the minerals in water can fuck shit up. Also, you're changing the ph the more you dilute, which in Lexol isn't optimal to begin with.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2015
  18. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Tricks learned from leather workers.

    pH? Meh. It's about dying shoes and making sure dye soaks in and settle. pH is the last thing you should worry about.

    Lexol between layers of dye will strip the older layer and block the newer layer. Instead use Lexol (or Bick4) diluted dyes will help pigments soak in much more uniformly.
     
  19. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,331
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    I think pH is the first thing you should worry about honestly. Ron Rider in his antiquing thread clearly states between layers you should condition to remove excess dye. He gets great results and so have I. Horses for courses.
     
  20. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    You get way less excess dyes if you dilute your dye with Bick4. Less pigment applied all while Bick4 help them settle better.

    The ingredient for your process and mine are exactly the same - dyes and conditioners. Hence negligible difference in impacting leather pH. Or, mine will impact to a lesser degree due to lesser dye used.

    You use conditioners to remove excess dyes. I use conditioners to prevent excess dyes and help dye soak in.

    Both methods conditions the leather, while yours only conditions and mine uses the condition process to set in dyes.

    Oh, and not to mention that Bick4 diluted dyes spread better as well.

    p.s., Bick4 > Lexol for this purpose. But the latter should do.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by