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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. manasdirge

    manasdirge Senior member

    Messages:
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    hi, I am wondering if I need to moisture long time stocked shoes with Bick 4/Lexol first, or saphir renovateur will be fine?
     
  2. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Don't use renovateur.

    Use Lexol or bick4.

    And make sure you use wax polish for the welt stitchings to replenish dried wax content.
     
  3. manasdirge

    manasdirge Senior member

    Messages:
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    then what does renovateur do if not moisturize the leather? just use them in the every few months maintaining?

    and where can I get lexol/bick4? are what do they do except moistrue the leather?

    I know this might be basic to you guys and I really appreciate your patience with me [​IMG]
     
  4. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Renovateur has part mild cleaner but you only need to condition.

    Waxing the threads helps rejuvenating them.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    You should be able to find Lexol on Amazon or your local shoe care or car care store.

    Bick4 on Amazon or their own website.
     
    2 people like this.
  6. manasdirge

    manasdirge Senior member

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  7. BackInTheJox

    BackInTheJox Senior member

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    Ok, so this morning I got a little antsy and decided to go ahead and give these a once over with some isopropyl alcohol and elbow grease (in the burnished areas). Below are some pics (the lighting isn't identical to the original pics but you get the idea). Obviously this is only my first go at it, and I will have to even the color out. The photos are after I stripped much of the black color and then gave them a quick once-over with some AE cleaner/conditioner.

    I will continue to try to feather some of the burnishing so it all blends better, and then after some more conditioning, I am thinking of using some AE chili polish to slightly darken the leather and help it blend into the burnished areas.

    First time having a go at this, so it's obviously not perfect. Any suggestions/criticisms are welcome.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  8. thelook

    thelook Active Member

    Messages:
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    Jun 12, 2015
    Suede Questions Please

    I picked up a couple pair of suede shoes in the last few months, haven't worn them much, i.e. BB oxfords, J&M boots. I bought some spray, also a brush with a little bar of what looks like soap, evidently to remove stains, from J&M.

    I need advice on the initial care treatment. Also, is it OK to use the wadded paper installed in the new shoes in place of shoe trees? Can I just follow the instructions on the spray and be done with it? I doubt these will be worn much, if at all, in inclement weather. Should I take the products back to J&M and get something else? I'm new at this.

    Appreciate any comments, or link to a tutorial if already posted in this thread somewhere. Thank you.
     
  9. smoothie1

    smoothie1 Senior member

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    @BackInTheJox - it looks like a decent first attempt at stripping the color and burnishing.

    Be sure to recondition the shoes when the stripping process is complete.

    I think you'll have spectacular results, if you strip them a bit more. You may wish to employ another product as well. Others may have more informed suggestions about what to use to strip the color further. Best of luck.
     
  10. BackInTheJox

    BackInTheJox Senior member

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    Thanks. I stripped a bit more, conditioned, and then just for kicks went over them with a single coat of chili polish. Here's what they look like at the moment.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    3 people like this.
  11. smoothie1

    smoothie1 Senior member

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    Nice and much improved. They'll look even better with a little wear and natural patina. The color and shading makes them look European.

    Enjoy your new shoes!
     
  12. tharkun

    tharkun Senior member

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    Looks like you should work for AE in the finishing department. The way they look now you can sell them as firsts! Very nice!
     
  13. Crat

    Crat Senior member

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    You've done a great job mate!
     
  14. Crat

    Crat Senior member

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    Those were my Connistons to be honest; I've never waded in my Galways (though I have taken them salt water fishing).


    Unfortunately not. I have other, more rugged boots that do but I was on a trip and needed something I could also wear in a smart casual setting. We had a Dutch Stijlforum meetup but I got told off for wearing unpolished shoes. Don't think a bellows tongue would have helped here btw.

    Oh well, this is the damage. Time for some obenaufs.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    2 people like this.
  15. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    Location:
    NBPT, MA
    Conistons look great @Crat. I obenauf'd my C&J Islay boots last winter and couldn't be more pleased with the additional weatherproofing. Excessive snow last year in Boston and every time I stepped off the sidewalk, I'd have to navigate ankle deep slush. HDLP added a nice barrier so the salty, slushy water wouldn't penetrate the leather.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
  16. BackInTheJox

    BackInTheJox Senior member

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    Thanks again to the help/encouragement on here. I tinkered a little more with the shoes, and here's what I'm left with as a final (for now, at least) results:


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    2 people like this.
  17. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    Athens
    Really great job!!! love the outcome [​IMG]

    Ps. give them some spit or mirror shine at the toe-heel area to give the color some more depth
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
  18. mreams99

    mreams99 Senior member

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    Location:
    Ohio
    I was searing a venison roast to prepare it for the crock pot. A few drops of oil spatters got on each shoe. Now I've got small dark polka dots on my shoes.
    Can these be removed?
     
  19. 1up

    1up Senior member

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    Location:
    Vancouver
    The oil has absorbed into the porous leather.

    I had a problem with an oil stain on marble once. Made a paste with Baking soda + water, applied it, and left it overnight covered with plastic wrap and it sucked out the oil.

    Can a similar principle be applied here? Not sure that would damage it further..!
     
  20. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Don't do this. Use a degreaser like renomat.
     
    1 person likes this.

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