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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    No, you don't understand. AE caked shits on shell cordovan, taking away everything that is the beauty of the hide. If brushing could take care of it all, then one would have taken the steps anyway. However, it's shit loads of inks dumped of the surface.
     
  2. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    I wash the surface off with water. The water based ink comes right off. It's nothing like Alden's coating.
     
  3. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    In what way does it differ. I've removed the coating from a pair of Alden cigar Indys . It was an accidental/ probably foolish/ mad scientist sort of affair but it turned out well and they actually have developed a beautiful patina. Just curious as I've never owned a pair of AE shells. Now that I think about it I don't belive I've even seen a pair irl
     
  4. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Have you read posts where they wiped AE's shoes down with a damp cloth and the color just runs off for forever? That was when I immediately understand that AE dumped water based finishing liquid on the poor hide. They have this kind of habbit using water based products on all of their shoes. It is sticky, nasty, and ugly, but the pro is that it is removable with just water, but be aware that it takes running water and a dauber or coarse cloth.

    Alden's coatings are actually some sort of acrylic, like the type God knows where they made it. It is best to remove these types of coatings with a mild solvent.
     
  5. mimo

    mimo Senior member

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    Using stuff to remove stuff before applying other stuff seems rather unnecessary. Brush the damn things, and wear them. If there's any excess polish or finish on them, it will wear away just fine.

    Anyway, going back to the OP's main issue, that one part of the shoe was a different colour to the rest, that's just the natura of the beast. And removing the finish will probably emphasise the variation rather than reduce it. Shells do not have even colour; that's part of the charm. And with a mass produced shoe, it might well not even have been from the same shell. Horween's "Colour 8" varies from dark oxblood to port wine to quite a bright bloody red. Every shell is different. Learn to love it.
     
  6. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Ah! You just addressed your concern within your own quotes. Look, they tried to even out the difference in color. But guess what, they dumped truck loads of inks on the surface. Now, what does sticky surface inks do that we are all trying so hard to avoid? Brushing isn't going to help, and the application of a better product is more than necessary. If it's excess polish, who cares? But, it isn't.

    The difference in coloration is all due to different lighting. Hell, even the shine varies from the left boot/shoe to the right.
     
  7. mimo

    mimo Senior member

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    The difference in colour is most likely due to a difference in colour.
     
  8. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    I can't figure out what the hell happened to these shoes, and no one will fess up.

    Veg tanned Buttero sneakers that look stained. Maybe by water (no salt stains). Any ideas on how to fix?

    [​IMG]
     
  9. DinSko

    DinSko Member

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    pour a bottle of bourgogne in the other shoe and they will match just fine :)
     
  10. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    That might be what happened to the left shoe. Who knows with kids.
     
  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Try good old vinegar and distilled water. 3:1 ratio. They might have to be soaked in it with paper towels stuck to them and saran wrap over the paper towels to control evaporation. Generally spots like that when dry is due to over-alkaline exposure so acidifying them while having something absorbent can extract and transfer the soiling to the paper towel.

    Rubbing with vinegar should be step one though.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  12. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    Okay, thanks for the advice. I'll try that now.
     
  13. Nobleprofessor

    Nobleprofessor Senior member

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    I have read this thread a number of times and learned a lot. I decided to try a project and I wanted to share the results.


    These are a pair of Church's tassel loafers. I bought these for myself (on ebay). They are my size and I like them. I want to save them if I can.

    They are supposed to be a burgundy color. As you can tell from the pictures they need some real work. I couldn't figure out if they just have years of excess polish on them or something else. It's like the finish is almost flaking off. I remember years ago there was a company that had a spray on polish that really ruined a lot of shoes because it looked too glossy when first applied and then it would flake off. I can't tell what is happening with these. They are in okay, but slightly rough shape otherwise with original soles and heels, but they had some minor cracking and a few dings here and there. I was most concerned with all the flaking spotting.

    Here are the before pictures:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    As you can tell there is some flaking, but there is also some sort of staining. I think part of it is water staining and part of it is old polish. These shoes were just not taken care of.


    I decided to try Saphir Renomat based on some suggestions I read in this thread. This was my first experience with Renomat.

    My first impression was this little bottle of milky looking stuff isn't going to do anything. Then, I opened the bottle. WHOA! I wish I would have known to use this stuff in a well ventilated room. This stuff is powerful.

    I used a clean terry cloth rag and added a dime size amount of the Reno Mat and started wiping it on the shoes. IMMEDIATELY, it started taking off layers of polish, color, dirt, grime, etc. I had to keep switching spots of the towel because the polish it was taking off was building up on the towel. I went all over the uppers. The gunk and grime was especially tough along the edge of the upper near the sole edge. A few times, it even felt like the old polish and gunk was getting sticky.

    I used a dime sized amount, but I had to reload the towel 3-4 times. So, I may have used too much. But, I noticed that it was really working and didn't want to be too stingy with this stuff.

    After the renomat, the uppers have a dull satin finish and most of the old polish blotches are gone.

    Here is what they look like after the renomat:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I can still see some of the old polish and some of the blotches.

    After applying the Reno Mat, i followed the directions and let it sit for 15 minutes and then buffed the residue off with a clean towel or rag.

    Here is what they look like after buffing off the reno mat

    [​IMG]


    The color is NOTICEABLY brighter after buffing off the renomat. The Color is also deeper and they look much better. BUT, as you can tell from the above photo, there are still blotches and spots of darker colors. So, I may need to try the Reno Mat again.

    I think after a second application of Reno Mat, the color should be more uniform and the leather will certainly be MUCH cleaner. After that, I think polishing and shining will make a huge difference in making the color much more even.

    My impression at this point was this is great (but very strong) stuff. If I only had minor amounts of polish to remove, I am not sure I would start with this. The leather feels much softer than before.

    After a few more days, I decided to get back on my project.

    I tried another round of Reno-Mat because I wasn't completely happy with the first result. I think the second round made a HUGE difference.

    Here are a couple of pics. The only thing I did was use the Reno-Mat and let it soak, then buffed it off with a clean towel.

    The majority of the spotting is gone (although some still remains). Overall, the depth of the color seems MUCH better. This is BEFORE I have put any polish on them -- Just Reno Mat and buffing with a cloth.

    Obviously, nothing will fix the cracking. But, I think I can still make them last for quite a while as long as I keep them conditioned, nourished and polished.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    I think this next picture shows how much better they look. Compare it to the first picture in the thread and you can tell how much it helped.

    [​IMG]

    Next, I tried some Saphir Renovatuer to condition them a little after the Reno Mat.

    For me, it has been a learning process.

    Here is the final result:

    This is after one application of Renovateur and then polishing with some burgundy cream polish.


    [​IMG]

    This last picture shows the same shoe as the first picture after the process was done.

    [​IMG]

    The total process was:

    Saphir Renomat buffed off after 15 minutes

    Saphir Renomat again (left on overnight) and then buffed with a cloth

    Saphir Renovateur applied and buffed off with a cloth and horse hair brush

    Polished with burgundy cream polish.
     
    4 people like this.
  14. Yellowevo84

    Yellowevo84 Senior member

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    Well done sir on trying to resurrect an old pair of shoes. There is nothing worse than people who buy nice shoes and neglect to take care of them properly.
     
  15. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    For the first month of wearing, I would suggest conditioner (like a lotion of sort) every two weeks, but from then on, a brush will be better friend than any treatments.
     
  16. insurin

    insurin New Member

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    Apr 21, 2015
    How do gents and ladies.

    I have entered the world of shoes which is probably to my detriment. I have never had a decent pair of shoes before and now I think I have, well for my first pair anyway. I was hoping you could give me some pointers on shoe maintenance. I'll pose some questions below and hopefully you can point me in the right direction.

    I have some new Loake Aldwych in black and some new Pediwear Pickworth in burnished chestnut calf. I also have some black leather cream and some black leather wax and also some neutral cream and neutral wax.

    For the Loake Aldwych

    [​IMG]


    I am unsure on what colours to use. Do I apply the black cream let it dry and then apply the black wax or do I need to apply a neutral cream and a neutral wax or is it a neutral cream and then a black wax?



    For the Pediwear

    [​IMG]


    Is it just a case of neutral cream and then neutral wax?



    The Soles

    Do I apply anything to the sole, i.e. do I apply a neutral cream to the soles.

    Thanks
     
  17. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Insurin, yes, this is definitely to your detriment. Join the club! I think you need a bottle of Lexol conditioner, or Bick4 conditioner and some black and brown wax. Condition every quarter or so, depending on if they look a bit dry. Other than that polish them to your liking, but don't over do it. You don't need much polish. Get cedar shoe tress for them and a horsehair brush for buffing. In between wearing a good buff with the brush should be all you need for most days for raising a shine between polishing.
     
    5 people like this.
  18. rando

    rando Senior member

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    Oct 6, 2007
    I have some brogues that have caked kiwi wax in the holes (mainly because I didn't really know what I was doing before discovering this thread), I have been using a wooden toothpicks dipped into some rubbing alcohol to try and remove. This has worked on some of the less troublesome brogue holes, but for the more troublesome holes it has been insufficient. Any ideas? I'm afraid of damaging the leather if I pick too hard...
     
  19. Yellowevo84

    Yellowevo84 Senior member

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    Insurin welcome to the club. PatrickBOOTH gave you a good list of what you need to get. Can't stress enough about the shoe trees. In terms of what you were asking condition first followed by creams afterwards. It is not required to put a full on wax coat over the top as the cream polishes contain traces of wax anyway. It just depends on what level of shine you want. To keep color consistency I would use a matching color polish and wax. If your not able to find a matching brown then go with the neutral. Get into a habbit of taking care of your shoes and they will last a long time.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  20. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Try Renomat, lather up as a soap, and use a dauber to work it on around. It will take everything off, except for the leather's finish (depends, though).
     

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