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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Just use a bit of rubbing alcohol on the toe, then put the cream and buff, cream and buff again, and then start building the mirror shine with wax.
     
  2. Darell John

    Darell John Active Member

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    1/ let the things dry...
    2/ Coat of renovateur
    3/ 3 coats of cream polish drying and buffing between coats
    4/ wax polish dry and buff 3 coats
    5/ spit shine about 20 coats

    It's black I think your fine.
     
  3. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Basically it's steps to rebuild the surface finish. The rough feel is all that waxes and creams being rubbed off away when you used too much water for the toe.
     
  4. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Pat, I've always wondered, is rubbing alcohol as sufficient in terms of removal of old polishes as denatured alcohol? I've been using denatured alcohol, amongst other stripping agents, but not yet tried the rubbing alcohol.
     
  5. Darell John

    Darell John Active Member

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    Woops someone beat me to it, but yea dun worry they arnt ruined. Being black it's a lot easier than if let's say they were a patinaed brown..


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. Darell John

    Darell John Active Member

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    Well need some advice just bought a pair of AE in natural shell, any advice on what polish to use if I do use polish or cream? Saphir neutral cordovan or whiskey?

    Photo for reference
    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. SonniHS

    SonniHS Member

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    Thanks everyone - I'm feeling much more confident about the shoes now :)

    I've just ordered renovateur, but it will probably first arrive monday.

    And will the following be an ok procedure?

    1. Renovateur
    2. Shoe Cream
    3. Brush and buff
    3a. Repeat 2+3 until satisfied
    4. Potential use of wax

    Anyone have a link to a guide, maybe even a YouTube video? :)
     
  8. pnewelljr

    pnewelljr Senior member

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    So Lexol is different than? I always just thought both were conditioners. I am a little nervous about soaking in water and vinegar, wont that make the leather shrink or something?
     
  9. Darell John

    Darell John Active Member

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  10. SonniHS

    SonniHS Member

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  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It's fine, especially just for a bit too much wax on a toe. He doesn't need stripping right down to the grain. Why use something harsher if it isn't necessary?


    Renovateur is allegedly a conditioner, but it is honestly more of a polish. Lexol is a water based emulsion with no wax in it. It is meant to penetrate into leather and stay there. Renovateur is a polish with a bit of oil content. I haven't had "luck" with it in the conditioning department.

    You need to plump up the leather fibers so water and vinegar is meant to due that while maintaining a leather safe pH. Leather shrinks because of alkaline overexposure, the vinegar will keep this from happening. After doing this, I'd recommend a conditioner like Lexol or Bick4.



    Renomat is a stripper with acetone in it. It is not a necessary shoe care product unless you're experimenting or caking your shoes with so much polish that you need to strip it away.
     
  12. SonniHS

    SonniHS Member

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    Instead of a ruined shoe, I am learning - happy days! :)

    So rubbing alcohol would be a better option in my case? Which then is the same as isopropyl alcohol 99%?
     
  13. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Lexol is more of an emulsified oil, think neatsfoot oil that had its properties altered to be mixed with water for sufficient penetration without leaving too much residue on the surface. It certainly conditions a lot better than Renovateur, because of its fluid characteristic, and because it is nothing more than oils and water. Reno, on the other hand, was made too "dry" - it dries in minutes as opposed to Lexol, which could take up to a day - and thus, applying too much will leave a thick finish on the surface, and too little will leave the leather in vulnerable state.

    The reason I love Glen's conditioner is 1). because it was made with raw oils (not a fetish, but a personal preference), and 2). because it nourish the leather properly while giving a shine. I grease my dress shoes per heavy maintenance that would include stripping, but then again, it's just me, I don't recommend people doing it if they don't feel comfortable with it, or had bad results in attempts doing it. Working with raw oils and grease can be so much more a pain than anything. Therefore, products like Hydrator that Pat recommends, or Lexol, even Bick4 is much more suitable in terms of restoring a seriously huge amount of oils back into leathers.

    I usually dilute the denatured alcohol with 50% distilled water. I thought if one needs to remove mirror finish, hence heavy solvents. Otherwise I wouldn't opt for denatured alcohol(mixed or alone by itself).

    Was rubbing alcohol mixed with another substance in it?
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015
  14. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I think you both are thinking too deeply into this rubbing alcohol. Use vodka if it is laying around. Any rubbing alcohol will be fine on a cap toe for removing a bit of polish. It isn't like you're prepping the shoe for a re-dye.
     
  15. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    That being said, with today's drum dyed struck through leathers, there are no need of re dying the leather as well LOL!!

    Vodka? I prefer Johnnie Walker, because I'm a narcissistic asshole! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015
  16. thefastlife

    thefastlife Senior member

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    how bad an idea is it to only have 2 pairs of shoes in rotation for a 5 day work week? :confused:
     
  17. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Honestly, I'd say it depends on whether if you are driving to work, or walking and taking public transportation.
     
  18. SonniHS

    SonniHS Member

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    For me it's also a translation thing, as I wasn't sure what rubbing alcohol covered exactly.

    So, I'll search my apartment for alcohol :-D
     
  19. Jurgis

    Jurgis Well-Known Member

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    I've seen quite a few pairs of shoes that have a lighter color to raised areas, like across the toe creases in the pic below. Is this a sign of cheap leather or corrected grain? I'm trying to decide if these shoes are real alligator, incidentally.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. thefastlife

    thefastlife Senior member

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    driving, 99% of the time.
     

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