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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Thanks for getting it, Monotovs. Feel free to converse as per needed.
     
  2. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    No argument there. I personally think speaking...and particularly writing...is something that should always be approached seriously and with as much focus and clarity of mind as can be brought to bear.

    The one thing I feel a pretty deep aversion to is "ganging up" on someone. It's the story of the ugly ducking...except that in the real world the ugly duckling usually gets pecked to death.

    The truth is that the most effective posters...English speakers or not...find that a forum such as this one provides them a magnificent opportunity to hone their communications skills. To learn to speak English...or more to the point...to learn to write it.

    Those that don't take that opportunity miss out.

    Even if you're a native English speaker, if you're misspelling words from indifference, making no attempt to properly punctuate sentences or capitalize words when needed (like at the beginning of a sentence), using slang, or failing to organize your thoughts...you're not communicating as well as you could.

    And IMO it is a little disrespectful as well.

    That said, no one is ...or should be...spell checking here. The gap between human beings is too large...both parties have to reach in the other's direction.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2015
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  3. AAJJLLPP

    AAJJLLPP Senior member

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    I am a bit lost on how you are using 'buffer' still. Are you using it in the way that the leather can shift pH a bit and still be in a healthy zone? Or are you referring to a buffer solution?

    A buffer solution minimizes the change in pH by shifting it's equilibrium to match the addition of acidic hydronium ions, or basic hydroxide ions. Leathers are tanned with acidic buffers, and some products like vinegar (another good reason to use it) can act as a buffer solution.

    What this means for your shoes is that if they are adequately buffered, the addition of even something very basic, can have a negligible effect on the pH.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2015
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  4. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    No no no, you get me entirely wrong. ENTIRELY WRONG!

    Buffer zone that I was talking about does not have anything to do with chemical stuff. I was talking about how the chemists who designed the products would make their product in neutral pH just so that it is balanced in between both zones, neither alkalinic nor acidic, just so that the product sells and people cannot criticize them for designing a product neither tragically eats away their leather or hardens the piece beyond imagination. That was what I meant, nothing much about chemistry running here.

    Feel free to converse about it.
     
  5. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    On a side regard, though, I really appreciate how you bring forth the buffer solution, which, I think most products designers were toying around to get it right.
     
  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    AJJLLPP, when you talk about buffering (you see that advertised in a lot of cosmetics "buffered glycolic acid" and such) what do you mean it shifts its equilibrium. What equilibrium? I was always under the impression that buffering was just the addition of another chemical to change the overall pH of the product, while retaining the desired chemical (in the case of cosmetics glycolic acid, or whatever). Is my thinking off on this?
     
  7. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    FWIW I can say it looks pretty close to what he was under the impression of, Pat.
     
  8. AAJJLLPP

    AAJJLLPP Senior member

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    A buffered acidic solution contains a weak acid and its conjugate base (vice versa for a buffered base). For example glycolic acid has the formula HOCH2COOH, then its conjugate base would be the same other than the loss off a hydrogen OCH2COOH- . Any weak acid does not fully dissociate in water it sits at an equilibrium, only a small percentage of the acidic molecules actually gives up their hydrogen in water making the solution more acidic. The addition of any basic hydroxide(OH-) lions will combine with the hydrogen from the weak acid to make H2O and a its conjugate base. Any acidic hydronium ions added (H3O+) will combine with the conjugate base to form H2O, and the weak acid molecule. Note that the weak acid molecule in itself is not acidic its only when it releases its hydrogen that it is contributing to the pH. If you are just worried about the product turning more basic the conjugate base is unnecessary and any weak acid could do the job, like vinegar.



    Heres a more visual explanation:
    http://chemcollective.org/activities/tutorials/buffers/buffers3
     
    2 people like this.
  9. pnewelljr

    pnewelljr Senior member

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    Now that I've been wearing these once or twice a week for a month or two, I am wondering if you guys think I need metal tips or not. Are my toes wearing down prematurely fast?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    From the look of the soling paterns, I suppose those are AE's?
     
  11. pnewelljr

    pnewelljr Senior member

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    Cheaney
     
  12. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Pardon me, then.

    Tip of the sole often wear down fast. I'd opt for taps on that place.
     
  13. pnewelljr

    pnewelljr Senior member

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    Sorry, didn't mean to be rude. Thanks for your recommendation. Just read that it depends on the person, so trying to figure out if I am one of those people.
     
  14. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    No problem. Not really getting the people thing, but I'd definitely recommend you put toe taps on the tip of the soles.
     
  15. pnewelljr

    pnewelljr Senior member

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    Alright, thanks for the advice!
     
  16. Trqmaster

    Trqmaster Senior member

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    Get flush ones! Granted, there are structural risks in installing toe taps, but I figure no worse then wearing the threads down. Except, with the taps, the sole thickness stays intact.
     
  17. Yowzer

    Yowzer Senior member

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    Hi all. These are my Meermin LMs museum calf. Anyone would have any idea on alleviating the interesting creases/striations on one side of the quarters? (it's only on one shoe). A buff with Saphir Renovateur perhaps? They don't appear to be cracks however. From memory, they may been present from the beginning but that has been some time ago.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It looks like just finish cracking, could be the top coat, or the dried wax polish. Other than putting some Lexol on it I'd live with it. If you use renomat to remove it you're likely going to ruin the museum finish on it as well.
     
    2 people like this.
  19. Staffer18283

    Staffer18283 Senior member

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    I get the same on a pair of VASS museum. I think its just a sign of low quality leather. Interestingly enough, I dont get it in a more recent pair that I ordered from Vass, and its likely that they switched suppliers (the new museum feels more supple as well).

    I doubt that any shoe care product will fix this although open to suggestions.
     
    1 person likes this.
  20. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Untrue.
     
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