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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    Jul 23, 2012
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    Athens
    Mostly Travers i use dubbin at the vamp area (sparingly at the entire shoe , and really really rare at the areas like heel and toe) ! if the shoes doesnt have build ups of polish you wont need to rub just apply it with your fingers at it ll get absorbed quit easily
     
  2. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Somehow I always rub them well in just to be safe, Ben. They're always effective. From what I read in antique books, way back then when leather was a lot better and were all veg tanned, people used to rub greases/dubbins on before polishing.

    If my shoes were veg tanned I wouldn't have to worry too much. However, all the calfskins here are chromed, so, until I get bespoke shoes, or else fuck it LOL!!
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. mimo

    mimo Senior member

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    Aug 16, 2012
    Shoe care products often work better if you apply them with a strong French accent. Italian is OK, but French is best. Sneer a bit, too. Works like magic.
     
    2 people like this.
  4. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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  5. garland

    garland Senior member

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    I wondered why I wasn't getting good results with my saphir products.
     
  6. Carson

    Carson Senior member

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    Jan 15, 2014
    Location:
    Oaklandia
    I have a pair of Alden color 8 shell tanker boots, but I am not so enthusiastic about the dark edging/welt area nor the standard eyelets. Recently, a SF member who lives back east, had his edging antiqued by a cobbler who also installed these really nice brass eyelets. I think the combo is striking and is a nice contrast to the color 8 shell. I'd like to have something like this done on my tankers, but I want them to be in good hands and not have my shell boots get screwed up. Can anyone suggest a west coast cobbler that they think could do a good job with this? Likewise, if not west coast, then anywhere else would be next best. Thanks.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    I would suggest you contact B. Nelson in NYC. Or else, if you are one helluva adventurous dude, you may try getting Abbeyhorn "Snake Head" Sleeking bone, or any burnishing tool from Tandy Leather Factory, some conditioner, neutral cream and wax, and do it yourself. The way how edges can look "antique" is via the use of neutral polishes and burnishing - don't forget to brush, also. As time goes by, you'll get the effect you desire. Neutral polishes will saturate the color, and the addition of a conditioner aids in saturating from the finish to the fibers.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2015
  8. Carson

    Carson Senior member

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    Yeah, I know of B. Nelson. Thanks for the reminder. As for the edging - what I am looking for is something like in the previous photo. They used to be like mine, which I am posting a photo of below, so someone - the cobbler - had to at least strip off the original dark edging that mine below have, and made it look like the photo above...

    [​IMG]
     
  9. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Sorry. Forgot to mention stripping the previous finish. You can DIY that step with alcohol, turp spirit (the one from paint shop), or if the finish is water based, simply scrub with a brush and some water.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. MonotovsOpera

    MonotovsOpera Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Oct 24, 2014
    Brian the Bootmaker is located in Los Angeles and should be able to do anything you ask. He is quite expensive, but he knows his stuff.
     
  11. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Brian Truong?
     
  12. Carson

    Carson Senior member

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    It does appear to be the very Brian….looks promising
     
  13. danne888

    danne888 Well-Known Member

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    Jun 28, 2012
    I have a pair of shoes in suede that i have brushed to hard and the Suede is slightly damaged. Is it possible to fix somehow?

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Stemo79

    Stemo79 Senior member

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    Somewhere in a field in Hampshire.
    
    what kind of damage are we talking about here? It's hard to tell by your image...
     
  15. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    Hard to tell anything significant from a photo regardless how good or bad it may be.

    The suede looks to be a chrome tanned leather and it is not dyed through...at least not with the same colour as is on the surface. So you've probably brushed away the leather that was darker. That may seem obvious...but what may not be obvious to anyone but yourself is that in the process you have actually broken and knocked off much of the fiber mat that comprises the leather. If we were to "mic" the leather in the places it is lighter, we'd probably find that it was thinner too.

    So yes, the leather probably is damaged, no, there's nothing you can do to remedy that. The only thing you can do is re-dye the leather either a darker colour or the same original colour.

    And stop scrubbing.
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. Stemo79

    Stemo79 Senior member

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    Feb 18, 2014
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    Somewhere in a field in Hampshire.
    

    Although I've not tried it myself (I'm very careful with my suede shoes!!) I heard that you can get the nap back by using a sandpaper....? This could be codswallop though.
     
  17. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
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    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    You need to be extra careful doing that. If you have dirt and such caked or embedded in the fibers of the leather, you can sometimes loosen them with sandpaper but the same thing happens with sandpaper as with too hard a brushing...except quicker and deeper...the fibers are cut or broken, or loosened from the surrounding matrix, and eventually the leather is worn down to where the fiber mat is too dense to make a good suede. Or too loose, and things go downhill fast from there.

    But again, the real problem danne888 has with these shoes is the dye variations...at least from what I can tell from the photos. The "nap" may be a little coarse but if the colour were restored no one would notice but him.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  18. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    How does one take care for stingray hides? Or does the stuff needs any kind of care at all?
     
  19. joachim92

    joachim92 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
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    Feb 11, 2014
    Anyone knows a good cobbler in Belgium to add a sleek sole to my boots? I want to maintain the low profile of the boots (mmm side zips). I walk a lot in them and notice the sole is wearing down pretty fast.
     
  20. kbuzz

    kbuzz Senior member

    Messages:
    603
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Hello all I would like to get the advice on the following. I have a pair of rm wiliams craftsman in whiskey. The pair has always been a bit too red in tone for me and I am curious if there might be a way to tone them down a bit and shift them more towards the brown family. Now I know there have been a few threads on this topic in the past but I don't seem to have found any on the Merlot burgundy to brown change. (Usually is brown to black or tan to cordovan etc). Now this lack of prior threads and pics may be a sign that's it's just impractical but thought I'd take a stab since these have been impervious to less invasive applications of brown, cordovan or black surface wax polish

    So the thought was to follow some of the tutorials and try to hit them with either the Saphir Decapant Stripper for Smooth Leather or Saphir reno mat. Condition with Saphir renovateur And follow with some creme polish in dark brown, chocolate or similar. Finally if all went well maybe hit them with final wax polish in brown or neutral. Would Saphir Juvacuir Recoloring Cream be appropriate for any of these steps or is this product for spot repair?

    So any thoughts appreciated. Is this folly? Would dye be a better way and then creme polish? While the boots are older and I'm not worried about destroying them, I was hoping to avoid the acetone dye route just due to the harshness factor.... So I tthank all In advance, with any opinion on strategy, products color or technique. And of course here's a quick pic of Boots in the current little red riding hood condition.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015

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