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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. BostonHedonist

    BostonHedonist Senior member

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    The Hanger Project for cedar and brushes. Saphir for fancy creams. Lexol for everyday basics.
     
  2. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    You're welcome

    :cheers:
     
  3. SoGent

    SoGent Senior member

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    PCK's advice was good. The brand of wax is optional - hard work is not.
     
  4. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I hear what you're saying here in terms of the cloth vs. the brush, but I still think a brush is better for lifting the microfibers of the leather fibers. Something a cloth isn't going to do really.


    I've found that the best shoe brushes are made by Kiwi and can be found at a lot of major drug store chains. So much better than the expensive ones, which I find are too stiff and scratch the surface rather than raise a shine.
     
  5. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Worse yet, I had to batter up many of these "expensive brushes" for them to work.
     
  6. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Start out with a brush and a cotton cloth. Add Glen's cream (preferably the waterproofing kind for gloomy weather) and go from there on.
     
  7. BostonHedonist

    BostonHedonist Senior member

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    Yes agreed. Just meant to highlight the importance of shoe trees rather than take a jab at brushes. As for brush quality, I usually just go for the cheapest brush of the size I want that is 100% horse hair and wood. Never had an issue with the ones I got from the hanger project or the local markets, but I certainly wouldn't recommend over-investing in a brush. I figure horse hair is horse hair.

    Now here's a question. How many brushes does one need? I've got three presently: one I use on black shoes, one I use on brown/red-shade shoes and one for chromexcel only.
     
  8. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    I have one for calf and one for shell. I only use small amounts of shoe cream, so transfer i negligible.
     
  9. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    I build up a small collection of brushes, which includes a series for dusting, polishing, and routine brushing.
     
  10. Fred G. Unn

    Fred G. Unn Senior member

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    I had posted the above posts last October. No one really seemed to know what to do with these, and C&J never responded. Obviously these are very casual boots. By now they were pretty much beat to hell and the leather had gotten really dry. I tried a little Renovateur on the back of the pull tab, which had already darkened somewhat from oils from my hand, and let it sit overnight. The Renovateur definitely darkened it further. As an experiment, since I didn't know exactly how else to treat and clean the leather, I decided to apply it to the whole shoe last night. Here's how it turned out:

    [​IMG]

    In all honesty, I like them much better in the newer darker color! It's always nice when an experiment goes better than expected. We'll see how they look after some more wear. I'm still not really sure what the deal is with this leather.
     
  11. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Well, you could try Bick4, Lexol, and Glen's conditioner in the further future.
     
  12. Fred G. Unn

    Fred G. Unn Senior member

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    Glen's has too much wax for such a casual boot IMO. I maybe should have used Bick4 this time but what's done is done.
     
  13. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    The reason for extra wax is 1). some shine (as per reference, for this one) and 2). a lot more protections, which, if these boots are going under weather, is crucial.
     
  14. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I don't think that would be much of a factor. GlenKaren conditioner has beeswax, coconut oil and orange oil in it. The beeswax is not as hard as carnuba...it won't shine like carnuba.

    If any wax is going to be used on a casual shoe beeswax is going to be the wax of choice. Waterproofing agents such as Montana Pitch Blend and Obenaufs...both intended for casual/work shoes...are based on beeswax.
     
    2 people like this.
  15. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Indeed. However, Tapir from Germany was known to used carnauba in their grease. My theory is if a grease contains carnauba it'll brings forth a very tough element resistance barrier, what do you think?

    Side notes: I don't know about you, but unless I am wearing fire fighting boots, the only other leather I'd put Obenauf on is generally sole leather.
     
  16. Kahuna75

    Kahuna75 Senior member

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    I apply a very light coat of obenauf HDLP with my fingers to my horween waxy leather boots, retains the original look of the leather and adds a little protection...very happy with it...second winter doing it...leather is not water beading slathered with the stuff nor do I heat the boots prior or afteralplication.
     
  17. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Sounds just right, the fingers won't over load it. Once per year application?
     
  18. Kahuna75

    Kahuna75 Senior member

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    Yes just once a year...the key for me was retaining the waxy look...I have seen were people heat their boots in ovens and also soften the hdlp and literally glob it on...I guess some need more waterproofing and it seems to work but it really darkens them and changes the look of the leather too much for me.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. Tyrone MacStiophain

    Tyrone MacStiophain Senior member

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    Hi all - I'm fairly new to shell cordovan, and just picked up a pair of Church's in great shape, except for a couple of noticeable scuffs on one heel:
    [​IMG]

    I gave them a coat of lexol non-darkening leather dressing, then wrapped a couple of layers of thick t-shirt over a spoon to smooth out the scuffs and the bottoms of the "waves" on the upper, where the skin had gotten a bit rough. Much improved over all, but I rubbed until a rough finish developed around those scuffs on the heel. The rough spot almost felt sticky.
    [​IMG]

    I think the 2nd photo shows that the scuffs are less noticeable, but there is a bit of a rough patch there as well. I switched to just a dry flannel cloth, which seems to have improved it a bit. Can any of you tell me 1) what I did wrong to make this rough spot, and 2) what is the best way to get rid of it?
     
  20. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    I would not have done it with the t-shirt; if you applied any force it's basically like sandpaper. I would just let it rest a couple of days and see if it clears up and then maybe use some wax to seal the shell.
     

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