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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Patrick R

    Patrick R Senior member

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    I just read the last 100+ posts and now wish I hadn't.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Poor you, sir, for whatever traumatic experience you happened to have caught...
     
  3. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Just a thought, had anyone ever tried Connolly Hide Care cream for their shoes? Stuff looks interesting.
     
  4. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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    I've used the old stuff they called Hide Food, it was pretty greasy but good for last chance saloon applications, similar to Grison. No idea what the new formula is like though.
     
  5. MDeKelver

    MDeKelver Senior member

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    @Fred G. Unn would you say that the belt is suitable for office dress (but not dress) wear? I am looking at the raw holes, etc. and am looking for a custom belt. The opportunity to have a 33 belt with holes .75 apart is compelling.
     
  6. MDeKelver

    MDeKelver Senior member

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    Like watching a slow motion train wreck and can't look away?
     
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  7. MDeKelver

    MDeKelver Senior member

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    Oh, this would be a great blog. Document all of the design discussions from concept to commissioning. Plus the follow-up service and analysis.
     
  8. Fred G. Unn

    Fred G. Unn Senior member

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    I have 5 belts from Equus and really recommend them highly! Everything is custom made and they are great people to work with. Check out their affiliate thread if you haven't already:
    http://www.styleforum.net/t/260644/...ather-belts-official-affiliate-thread/1620_30

    I wear my Baker's leather with suits as well as casual. I have 2 Baker's, 2 bridle leather, and 1 suede. The Baker's have darkened with age and have developed a great patina.
     
  9. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    i thumbs upped this by accident. Lexol's main ingredient is water to avoid this very issue. Adding more water before use does it a disservice.
     
  10. AAJJLLPP

    AAJJLLPP Senior member

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    My experiences have been that applying products while leather is damp/wet can set in water stains.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  11. sleepyinsanfran

    sleepyinsanfran Senior member

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    you know you have the option to selectively hide some comments and only show the rest? makes browsing much faster if you have several pages to read
     
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  12. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    I get you, Pat. It's alright.

    The leather is damp, not dripping.

    I am thinking of switching over to Lexol NF though, consider what you are saying. I know NF is the same formula, but I used to use Lexol NF before, and thinking that my care regimen is better suited with Lexol NF.
     
  13. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    For light color leather - yes!
     
  14. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Actually, applying a light conditioner such as Lexol or Bick4 when leather is wet is the only close-to-certain way I know to prevent water stains. I do it all the time when wet lasting boots. My experience is that the light oils allow the water to disperse evenly, as well as retard evaporation.

    Water stains are often...maybe always...the result of displaced minerals, chemicals, salts, etc., dissolved in water and then deposited as the water recedes or evaporates. Esp. if it evaporates too quickly. Kind of like the way detritus is cast up on a beach after the high tide.

    --
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
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  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I think the key is to use distilled water. It doesn't have any minerals that can leave spots. But in general water isn't the best for leather being that the pH is a tad higher than where it wants to be and what it is when it leaves the tannery.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  16. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    I always thought, from what I've learned and from doing experiments back in high school, that water's pH is neutral, and I thought that should not damage leather much.

    Anyway, how do I get distilled water?
     
  17. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Using or deliberately applying distilled water is always the best choice, but my reference was to shoes or leather that have gotten wet in the rain (although when I wet last, I use neither rain water or distilled). Water in leather picks up and dissolves minerals (such as chromium salts) and chemicals such as tannins in veg, that are present in the leather naturally. Something ort some combination of materials, at any rate. The water then displaces those materials and as it recedes, leaves it behind.

    Again..."I'm a shoemaker, Jim, not...." But when you wet last shoes or boots you confront this all the time. Of course, the best way to avoid water stains is to make sure the leather is thoroughly and evenly wet...or not at all. But if that is not possible, you can often prevent them by applying a light conditioner and letting the leather dry slowly. I've even used RM Williams to good effect although it leaves a greasy residue.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  18. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The supermarket sells it. You can get distilled Poland Spring and others, it is generally in the same section. You can also make your own, but it's a pain in the ass.

    Leather likes to be about a pH of 3 to 5. Water is at 7. Not terribly high, but not optimal either. Pretty much anything over about 6-6.5 shifts the protein fibers of the leather ionic negative which repels other ionic negative ingredients like moisture, tannage, and any synthetic ionic negative fatliquors that the tannery applied. It essentially starts to repel all of that and become brittle like rawhide. That's why salt is so damaging because it radically shifts the fibers ionic negative.
     
  19. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Talk about greasy residue and wet leather, hell, Obenauf is the worst I've known.

    Rain water is the last kind of water that should fall on shoes. It ain't the 1700s anymore when rain is pH neutral. However, during cleaning, should the leather gets soaked, I always make sure it gets soaked thoroughly, just as you said. It was bitter experience having the leather part wet.
     
  20. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I know that water is routinely used in shoemaking, and distilled would be the best. Water's pH isn't high enough to do any huge damage, but it isn't optimal. Rainwater is generally not neutral, (it is about 4.5 in pH in NYC) but somewhat acidic so the rainwater in itself isn't bad, but it's all of the other junk in it that becomes an issue if not cleaned off properly. It's amazing how much dirt and debris ends up on shoes after a walk in the rain. Not to mention motor oil that leaks on the pavement and such. All ends up on the shoes.

    DW, I would encourage you to take a look at the Leather Doctor Hydrator product for lasting. It is a pH adjusted relaxer which takes out wrinkles and really almost lets you reform the leather. I bet it would do wonderfully in shoemaking. Downside is if you are using it in any large amounts it is very expensive, and may not be worth it. Adding a bit of white vinegar to your water and testing with a pH strip is probably more "natural" and much cheaper.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015

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