1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,238
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    Not sure what leather that is but the significant difference is that shell is not really part of the hide--it is a membrane / muscle sheath that lies under the hide. Makes all the difference in the world...on so many levels.

    And the fact that shell is horse not cow.

    The less significant difference is the fact, that it is cow not calf.

    AFAIK, the liquor is of no significance...at least not in this context.
     
  2. mry8s

    mry8s Senior member

    Messages:
    113
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Location:
    DC Metro
    I understand the distinction between bovine skin and equine muscle (ok, not muscle exactly) fiber with respect to leather/shell, I'm just repeating what their site description of the product states. The fact that they started with the "same liquor" as used in their shell process may mean only that it's where they started and that the final product bears little resemblence to shell. And yes, they use cowhide for the Dublin. Anecdotal reports suggest it is both very supple and yet does not stretch much.

    For your enjoyment: http://horween.com/leathers/essex-and-dublin/
    And if you like charts, they list it in their tannage list with checkboxes under the processes used: http://horween.com/leathers/full-tannage-list/

    Mostly I was curious what to clean it with since I suspect the boots will see some use beyond dry indoor floors.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2014
  3. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    
    Your boots that I have in the inca grain are pretty damn waterproof on their own. I think it's just because of the stamped grain, I'd imagine. The thing that bugs me about stamped grains is while they are more water resistant dirt and stuff gets into the grain making it a bit of a pain to clean vs smooth leather.
     
  4. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    
    I've done all of the tourist stuff and temples already. I did it all in leather high top butteros with no issues. I'm going to have meetings and such so I will be in a suit for about a week while I'm there (im on the board of the NGO my lady works for).
     
  5. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    
    The fatliquor might be the same, but it isn't tanned the same way. Cordovan doesn't see any chrome. Chrome-excel does, and is just retanned with vegetable tonnage, I'm guessing for durability.
     
  6. joachim92

    joachim92 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    I have these shoes and want to take good care of them. I read some guides on hangerproject.com and concluded that I would need Saphir Renovateur and Saphir Pommadier cream (in black). I read that the pommadier cream protects the shoes. I live in a wet country and want to make sure that my shoes don't suffer from coming in contact with the rain so using the cream seems like a good idea. But I also don't want them to start to shine. I want that they look like when I bought them (matte).
     
  7. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    I'd say you'd be fine with the creams as they don't raise as high of a shine as the hard wax polishes. Saphir and, or GlenKaren creams would both be good choices. Make sure you don't wear them every day, use cedar shoe trees and if they get wet or you walk in wet grounds leave them with shoe trees in on their sides so the soles can dry out. I'd get a brush too and brush them to keep dirt from accumulating and raising the leather fibers after wearing.
     
  8. sacafotos

    sacafotos Senior member

    Messages:
    2,482
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Location:
    San Francisco
    

    "Hang on, Voltaire..." :)

    Totally agree. Wholecuts can look super formal or casual (Norvegese stitching like the Bonafé pairs posted in that thread).

    Curious if a black shell wholecut is worth it over calf for a formal shoe. I feel like the blooming would be an eyesore for a formal shoe, needing constant upkeep.

    With wholecuts, though, I guess it's all about which last you want it on for the occasion.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    What's the quote from?

    The blooming isn't bad, but the creases do fade, which I expressed I liked. Also crust calf will do the same.

    She'll wholecuts cannot be seamless whereas calf can if that makes a difference.
     
  10. sacafotos

    sacafotos Senior member

    Messages:
    2,482
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Location:
    San Francisco
    

    The movie Swingers, when Mikey gets all intellectual with the waitress and she snaps back with that line.

    Yeah, a Carmina wholecut on Rain last in black or navy shell has been on my list for a while. I think navy might be more unique because it works in place of black and just isn't common, and I can always add some black polish. @RogerP has a pair that's stunning.
     
  11. joachim92

    joachim92 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    Thanks! I was gonna get a brush (this one) to remove the renovateur / cream (I'm basing this on this guide), will get a second one to remove the dirt. Will also look out for some shoe trees.
     
  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Brushes aren't used for removing cream they are used to raise a slight sine and brush off small dust and dirt particles. It also spreads around the oils and waxes on the surface and lifts the microfibers of the leather.
     
  13. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

    Messages:
    1,437
    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Location:
    United States
    That's the basic thought from people, that brushes were design to remove the product. I don't know about removal, but I know that over time brushes accumulate a lot of polishes.
     
  14. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

    Messages:
    1,437
    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Location:
    United States
    In order to prevent blooming, make sure you condition shell with sufficient amount of oils and creams, and give it a ton of brushing. Neglecting oil content in shell cordovan caused the leather to push the stationary waxes and tallows impregnated during hot stuffing process.

    Wholecut shoes in Navy blue shell cordovan is my new target. As of construction - either you punch medallion on the toe, or else Norvegese wouldn't make it less formal, IMO.
     
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    
    I heavily disagree with your care for shell using grease and oil and such. That's ridiculous. Bloom is just a part of shell, if you don't like it don't buy shell. No leather required being smothered in grease.
     
  16. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

    Messages:
    1,437
    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Location:
    United States
    No no no, not smothering it, and I bet I'm the only crazy asshole who grease my shell here. I mean, give it a coat of cream per maintenance.

    Besides, regarding grease, I wouldn't smother my shell neither. Just a light coat across with my finger, and rub it in really good on.

    Crazy how I've never got blooming on shell. Guess I was just lucky.

    Guys who use Pecard's leather dressing would get bloom as well, Pat, not just shell. I know it is ordinary amongst leather.
     
  17. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

    Messages:
    1,437
    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Location:
    United States
    Besides, Pat, I guess daily brushing could prevent a lot of those blooming, perhaps?
     
  18. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    You can buy them from Valmour, in France:

    http://www.valmour.com/cleaning-products/cotton-bag-saphir-medaille-dor,63

    I've bought a couple of boxes of Saphir products from them before and they've been easy to deal with and have given me very good service.

    The bags are 6 euros a pair, which I think is about GBP4.50 at the current exchange rate.
     
  19. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    With the exchange rate strongly favoring dollars there's no reason to buy from US venders.
     
  20. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

    Messages:
    1,437
    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Location:
    United States
    Should one be concerned of shipping charges, though?
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by