**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. OREO

    OREO Senior member

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    I work as a cobbler and i can honestly say that if you take them back and ask for black you won't insult anyone and he should be able to do it while you wait.
     
  2. MrChris

    MrChris Senior member

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    A little maintenance on a Saturday morning on 4,5 years old C&J Lowndes...
    Before:
    [​IMG]

    After:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Beach Bum

    Beach Bum Senior member

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    Weird, looks like PB must be doing calf raises during his lunch hour everyday. Both those pairs have noticeable issues in the crease.

    Is it to late to refund those boots?
     
  4. niklasnordin

    niklasnordin Senior member

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    Im gonna get hell for this but what the heck :)

    A deerbone will fix that, my cordovan have the same issue.
    Here's a pic after brushing. I have had a hard brush and done it for a few minutes.
    [​IMG]

    here's a pic after about 1-2 minutes of a rubbing the deer bone and 1 minute of brushing
    [​IMG]
     
  5. pwhinson

    pwhinson Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tip. I used a bit of black cordovan creme on them and the back of a spoon. Problem solved.
     
  6. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Has anyone used Collonil 1909 Leather Cream on new shoes, straight out of the box, or Saphir Medaille D'or Creme de Soins? From a search of the internet, a general opinion seems to be that you should put something on new shoes as they may well have dried out in storage. I have both of these products, so I have to declare a vested interested!
     
  7. AlexanderTG

    AlexanderTG Senior member

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    Is there a good method for cleaning Margiela trainers (the suede/lamb style)? Pic attached.

    I guess I'm not so concerned about the blue and gray ones as they're a few years old but the rust colored ones I'm quite fond of and are relatively new. The suede has plenty of dark stains on the back (from driving, I'm assuming) and the leather has dulled pretty significantly. I just used some basic leather polish on them but I think I may need something more specific to colored leather. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Is it still considered good practice to bend a new pair of shoes by pushing the heel towards the toe?
     
  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    If you mean bending the forepart of the shoe, when was it ever? I don't know if it is destructive, especially, but IMO, the first time the shoe is flexed like that, the foot ought to be in it.
     
  10. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Thanks, DWF. I did, though, see a fairly archaic print of a machine that would do this - perhaps from the 30's or 40's, either on this site or on the leather one. There was, as I remember, a discussion about bending new shoes in this way as a means of breaking them in. I have been through the whole of the leather site and quiet a bit of this one and - typically - I can't find the debate. I agree, though, that it does sound counter- intuitive.

    I'm sorry to keep posting these 'what do you do to new shoes' but (as might be imagined) I am in the process of getting a new pair and want to get the preparation of them right!

    Thanks, again.
     
  11. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Perhaps with RTW, it doesn't matter too much. But more than one bespoke maker (myself included) will carefully position two pencils across the ball of the foot and direct the customer to deeply flex forward. This controls the initial break-in of the leather and "sets" the creases. After that first time (maybe repeated once or twice) additional bending, with or without the foot in the shoe, will certainly loosen up the fibers of the outsole and insole and make the shoe...perhaps...walk a little easier.
     
  12. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Thanks, as always, DWF. These aren't going to be bespoke shoes, so I would image that the first thing I should do is flex forward to set the creases.
     
  13. rutabaga

    rutabaga Senior member

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    Small review of the Saphir Greasy Leather Cream product, given to me by Kirby's Hangar Project for review.

    I used the cream on few different pairs of shoes: two veg tanned cowhide boots, a chromexcel handsewn blucher, and a chromexcel chukka. The cream is a little sticky/tacky when applied, and the cxl pairs more readily absorbed it when applied in thin amounts with a horsehair dauber. All but the chromexcel chukka had previously been treated with other products (Obenauf HDLP, Saphir Renovateur, and Saphir RenoMat) in varying combinations. The chromexcel chukka absorbed the cream the best and was most restored to its original hand and look compared to the other boots/shoes. There was a dry spot developing on the left rear of the chromexcel chukka, and the cream restored it nicely. I don't think the other shoes/boots were any worse for wear after using the cream, and likely were better off with the conditioning, but the chomexcel chukka seemed to benefit the most. Unfortunately I cannot directly a/b compare this to other creams, but perhaps in the future.

    Some pictures of the dry heel in question before/after:
    [​IMG]
    Before^. Note that the wrinkling is because the chukka is unlined with no heel counter. These are Eastland Made in Maine Jeffersons, I believe made by Rancourt. Very happy with them, by the way.
    [​IMG]
    After^
     
  14. naspratt

    naspratt Senior member

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    Does anyone have any suggestions for cleaning mixed material shoes? I have some leather-suede combo shoes and don't want to stain the suede when I polish the leather. Plastic wrap?
     
  15. wurger

    wurger Senior member

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    Use your fingers wrapped in a clothes to apply wax or cream, don't use a brush. You shouldn't get any on the suede.
     

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