**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. thelonius

    thelonius Senior member

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    Water is certainly not the universal solvent. Water solubilizes polarized organic or mineral molecules. Uncharged (non-polar) molecules such as fats/oils/waxes will not solubilize in water unless a suitable surfactant (soap or detergent - different degrees of the same thing) is added. Surfactants solubilize oils/fats by the formation of mycelles.
     
  2. tifosi

    tifosi Tire Kicker

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    That's a phrase I would say if I ever go to the Wizard and get a brain.
     
  3. thelonius

    thelonius Senior member

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    Could you tell me that wizard's address, I'd like to go and see him ?
     
  4. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I don't know anything about bike riding...in city or in the mountains...but unless we're looking at two different points, what I think you're seeing is just the "corner" of the spade outsole.

    I do see a "dent" in the upper surface of the welt, now that I look at it more closely. Is that what you're referring to? How would a bike cause that?
     
  5. Renault78law

    Renault78law Senior member

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    Naw, I'd never ride in my dress shoes.
     
  6. tifosi

    tifosi Tire Kicker

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    Follow the.... Nah. Too easy.
     
  7. RogerP

    RogerP Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. thelonius

    thelonius Senior member

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    Yes, that's what I was referring to - in the second photo in the series, showing the strange pressure mark or wearing of the outside part of the welt, and not just the top, but also from the bottom, for me it is reminiscent of cycle pedal marks. And the last photo in the series, which shows the flattening of the front part of the toe ( which is not apparent in the other photos). Glad to hear what the shoe owner has to say !
     
  9. RIDER

    RIDER Senior member

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    I'm still at the solubilize part.........
     
  10. Northampton Novice

    Northampton Novice Senior member

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    We'll actually it is - it's a scientific observation and is widely accepted as true.

    You seem to have provided a rudimentary explanation of the action by which compounds dissociate - this is not why water is termed the universal solvent. The term is based on the relative static permittivity indices and the phenomena of dielectric constant, where water holds the highest value of any known solvent.
     
  11. jaywhyy

    jaywhyy Senior member

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    wurt

    A high dielectric constant = more polar. That doesn't mean a solvent is more universal. Something with a super high dielectric constant is not going to solvate something super nonpolar.

    The whole concept of water water being a universal solvent is in biological context, not chemical.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  12. JezeC

    JezeC Senior member

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    Usually water stains/mark can be buffed out with a cloth.

    But for this unique pair, one little drop and I can't get the mark out.

    Any remedies?
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  13. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    It's strange...I was working with some very fine French calf yesterday and thinking about Bick4 while using it to chase pipes.

    Most of the silicone products, both commercial retail and wholesale, that I have used are great waterproofers. But Bick4 almost washes away with water. Not entirely...but I use it on dry and wet leather and can always re-wet the leather. So if there are silicones in Bick4 (not doubting) they are not there in large amounts or are in some form that I'm not familiar with...and not sure I'm concerned about.

    Just some thoughts..."straight from the bench"

    --
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  14. BootSpell

    BootSpell Senior member

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  15. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Pretty much like box calf.

    But while the stuff I'm getting from one source (Annonay--French) is, as far as I can tell, identical to box calf, another source, again French, is softer and struck through. Both are great leathers. I wish I could combine the best of both, however.

    I've always felt that leather for the best shoes should be struck through. But the Annonay, for instance, has a "harder" tighter grain. And I like that, too. But you seldom see a men's weight calf that is both.

    Since you're in El Paso, Charles Hardtke used to carry a French calf that was both struck through and had a good grain surface. I discovered it just as they were discontinuing it. :brick:
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014

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