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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I don't know why you say that...your posts in the pasts would indicate that you don't even believe it.

    If you do, all I can say is that while some stories have been embroidered upon there's probably a kernel of truth in every single one of them. St. Hugh's Bones is a good example--the story of St Crispin comes from Soissons, France and persists into the mediaeval times to be recast/reborn as an English legend. The fact that shoemakers used bones as tools all the way up until today is documented fact. In some eras that's all they had...or wanted. And for good reason.

    "64 to the inch" is another--documented by some of the most highly respected experts on the planet. .

    If you don't know anything about shoemaking, you may indeed write good fiction but that's all it will be--fiction--both in intent and in the specifics. And anyone who does know anything about shoemaking will immediately recognize you as a poseur.

    But no good writer omits the research.

    I apologize if your post was meant to be humourous...mine is not.

    But, FWIW, it is not meant to be censorious, either.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Technical manual writing is wholly different writing style than romanticized fictions. And the latter will unfortunately attract much wider audiences.
     
  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    OK, I get where you're coming from.

    That said, I've written three books (tutorials) on how to make boots and have been told repeatedly that my writing in them is superb ("good," "entertaining," "easy to understand," etc.). I am a good writer, I think...I work at it a little bit. But I know my subject too. I'd be straining at gnats to write about nearly anything else.

    But the bottom line is that romanticized fictions are still fictions and...depending on your definitions of "good writing" or what shoemaking is all about or even whether fiction is wholly appropriate... may not, in fact, actually be either good writing or about shoemaking.

    It puts me in mind of Trout Fishing in America--not really about trout fishing at all.

    Or a book by Bernard Cornwall (can't recall the title) about the Battle of Hastings (c.1066) where one of the protagonists kicks down an oaken door with the heel of his boot. Romanticized fiction, indeed... but ruined for me because I know that doors in that time were often as much as three inches thick and mounted on heavy iron hinges; and boots had no heels until roughly the 16th century.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
    2 people like this.
  4. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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  5. mimo

    mimo Senior member

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    Sometimes it's the smallest and least empirically-useful motes of knowledge, that delight me most. Thank you.

    I have a similar problem with fiction all the time, whether books or movies: some tiny detail that's obviously not right, breaks the spell of disbelief momentarily, and spoils the whole thing for a while. An anachronistic turn of phrase. Someone carrying luggage that appears to be empty, or drinking from an empty cup..etc. Sometimes pedantry has its price!
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    From what DW brought to me today, gentlemen, may I conclude the following statement:

    "I care not what others think, but should I wear a comfortable, beautiful, and lasting pair of shoes, I owe the maker not just the payment, but I also owe him a masterpiece, a sacrifice, and an effort. Should I look down, and feel happy, or delightful, about my feet, I know that I owe the shoemaker(s) so many debts, no payments could ever so be enough."

    The exaggerated statement above can also be applied to all hard workers of shoe factories such as that of AE, even though, for damn sure, AE quality had decline so severely.

    This is all genuine, not copied from anybody.
     
  7. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    It's much more entertaining to read tumblr posts that market articles of clothing as "bespoke". While mundane details about shoemaking as a craft fulfills some intellectual curious minds, they make poor entertainments.

    And you are very right. Making shoes and making money are two separate businesses. Thus a few renowned shoemakers sold their workshop or their RTW brands.
     
  8. Kahuna75

    Kahuna75 Senior member

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    And I am still confused why a Toppy goes on the bottom of shoe.....
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I'm sure that's true...for some. But, no disrespect intended, I don't think that the world owes me an entertainment. I don't spend my life searching for "...the next whisky bar Oh don't ask why..."

    So I filter everything I read or hear against fact, reality, logic, commonsense and experience, etc....in that order. (I'm sure that's what most people do...but I can only speak to what I know and am.)

    Bottom line, for me at least...even entertainment has to resonate.

    Oh! And I'm not selling.

    "To everything there is a season..."

    --
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2014
  10. ScuffedBluchers

    ScuffedBluchers Senior member

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    Doughnuts

    And it's killing me
     
  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Not to toot my own horn, well, actually yes, to toot my own horn: I sent back some Saint Crispins to get resoled at their workshop and the main finishing guy was very impressed with my skills and inquired as to my methods and products. Just sayin.
     
    5 people like this.
  12. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    That doesn't surprise me, Patrick. You are one of a small group on here that knows what they are talking about and what they are doing. Toot away!
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'm not sure I know what I am talking about, but I sure know how to make shoes shiny.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    You're the man, Pat!
     
  15. SushiOfTheGods

    SushiOfTheGods Senior member

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    So does anyone know what to do about bumpy/roughed up sole edge after wearing them in the rain? They look like jerky right now. [​IMG]
     
  16. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Do they taste like jerky too?
     
    1 person likes this.
  17. SushiOfTheGods

    SushiOfTheGods Senior member

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    If they did, I would just be buying new shoes instead Lol!
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. sleepyinsanfran

    sleepyinsanfran Senior member

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    let the shoes dry on their sides, and then use edge dressing/wax (depending on whether the edges are meant to be black or natural/brown)

    leather soles swell with water and can look awful then, but they should be back in shape (to varying degrees based on the quality of the sole leather), when fully dry.
     
  19. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    A shoemakers "cran" ('technical' word for secret trick):

    When they are close to dry but not entirely, take a bone (not an oily bone) or a piece of hardwood or even a smooth spoon and rub / burnish the edges smooth. All the bumpy spots will flatten and if you persist with your rubbing until the leather is surface dry you will, in the process create a fairly high shine.

    Now you can lightly sand the edges with relatively fine paper and then dye the edges if you want more colour. If you do this, then take a wet rag and moisten the edges after the dye has dried. Rub / burnish again and then apply wax.

    Or, if the edges don't need more colour, go back to where you burnished the edges, skip the dye and just apply wax or polish.
     
    1 person likes this.
  20. SushiOfTheGods

    SushiOfTheGods Senior member

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    Thank you gents for your advice! I will see to it that my shoes will be back to their original state.
    I've lately fully realized that shoes are meant to be worn so I wear them in rain without any regrets. Now I wouldn't wear them in snow and when they start spraying salt everywhere...
     

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