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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Don't take it too literally. Shell won't work very well with Renomat. At the very least, big shoe brushes would be your best friend when playing with shell.
     
  2. Kahuna75

    Kahuna75 Senior member

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    Renomat is great on shell for its designed purpose only. To strip layers of gunk off the shell..it is a great tool for undoing gobs of caked on product applied by a previous shoe owner or a manufacturer.

    Other than that as @traversco said it does not need to be a part of your regular treatment.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    In order to mount Topy the grain surface of the outsole must be broken (roughed up) so that the cement can soak in and best adhesion be achieved. Taking the Topy off will not change that. The outsole will be rough and the cement hard to get off short of grinding it off.

    --
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  4. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    If you read the detailed description, it says to apply it every six months. I don't think it would harm anything to do so but again, the description warns about oil spots...on clothes, on your shoes etc..

    Pure, natural neatsfoot (some of it is synthetic) might work just about as well and be considerably less expensive....if used conservatively and infrequently. It bears repeating that errant drops of oil can stain upper leather and clothing. If neatsfoot is wanted, Lexol-nf is highly emulsified and goes into the leather rapidly and leaves no (or less) greasy residue on the surface.

    You could even use it, sparingly, on the insoles...if the insoles in your shoes are real vegetable tanned leather insoles (not leatherboard, fiberboard, or sockliners). Again, "sparingly" (and infrequently) is the watchword and wipe the inside of the shoe out after it has rested for 24 hours or so.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  5. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    I used pure neatsfoot oil. Seems to absorb very well into bark tanned soles.
     
  6. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Yes, but you should be aware that the more oil you put on the more the leather is softened and the more the fiber mat is loosened. In terms of resistance to abrasion, too much oil is not dissimilar to water in softening the outsole and wet outsoles wear much faster than dry outsoles.
     
  7. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Thanks for the concern, D, but again, I only oil the sole as per need, not THAT frequently. I am aware of the counterproductive effect as well.
     
  8. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    VSC contains petroleum distillates. It says it right on the front of the bottle right next to the word "Warning".
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I'm sitting here looking at a box/bottle. It not only contains petroleum distillates but turpentine as well...and is "harmful if swallowed." Turpentine is distilled from pine resin, so I suppose you could call it a "natural" ingredient. But you could say the same thing about arsenic or even crude oil--they are "naturally occurring" substances.

    The point is that advertising is, by definition, misleading and even deceptive. But I suppose that as long as people insist on defining words according to their own singular, individual, lights, they have to accept the unique definitions of others, too. Of course nobody really knows what's what or even what the other guy is talking about under those circumstances...all the better to sell you something, my dears.
     
  10. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Yup, and it only work as a glaze cream.
     
  11. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Not according to the manufacturer's website:
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  12. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    Well, can we all believe them? I don't really think if I can believe them. I am currently owning a tank of the cream (slight exaggeration - only a 32 oz. container) of the cream, and from what I see, I can really tell that this thing is only advantageous in glazing and polishing, not really the kind of cream that nourish.
     
  13. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I'm not currently using or recommending it but there's lots of products out there that aren't significantly better...or worse.

    If we can't believe them, it begs the question: why do we believe Saphir or Collinil (sp?) or any of a dozen other products? Who can we believe, IOW?

    Frankly, I doubt there's much difference in any of the formulas (with the rare exception) across the board...not when you get right down to it.
     
  14. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    I don't really know what to say. I guess you got point.

    The thing is, test and results exist for such reason. Well, I believe in Saphir because I used it, and the result is just as expected. I cannot believe in, say, VSC, because I used the product and it was never as expected, e.g.

    As of the formula, yes, that is still pretty big a mystery...
     
  15. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Lies and statistics...that's all test results are.

    There was another discussion (in this thread I believe?) about veg tanning versus chrome tanning. IIRC. pB had posted a video clip about the toxicity of chrome tanning. Another member posted an EPA study (test and results) that showed that vegetable tanning was toxic, too. But when you read the fine print, it turned out that the studies were done with a micro organism. As I pointed out at the time there's lots of compounds that are toxic to micro organisms that are not toxic to human beings...that are even beneficial--garlic being one of them. And vice-versa.

    But the EPA was trying to make a broader point that was not supported by the data and it was accepted by at least one or two people here who read ...perfunctorily...the report.

    I've used Saphir and VSC and many, many, other products over the course of the 40+ years I've been in the Trade. I've had the opportunity to observe and evaluate all those products on a wide range of leathers and in a wide range of conditions.

    My conclusion is that if you wouldn't put it on your skin...for whatever reason--toxicity, irritation, greasiness--don't put it on leather. The skin test is the only sure-fire way to avoid issues. And the only test worth talking about.

    So...if you don't mind having "mink oil" (identified by a chemist as generally pig fat) or turp or petro-chemicals (naptha, benzene, mineral oil) on your skin, the leather won't mind either.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  16. OREO

    OREO Senior member

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    I'v done this before and its fine as long as a cobbler does it and uses sandpaper to get rid of any residue (for aesthetic reasons)
     
  17. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

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    DWFII Sharp point. I couldn't argue further.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  18. SushiOfTheGods

    SushiOfTheGods Senior member

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    Thanks DWF for the answer. I guess I'll consider it but not top priority at all it seems.

    I don't know if this belongs here but I just received a pair of Carmina double monks and it looks beautiful. However, the sole of one side has this gap shown below. I don't know what to make of it but I can see the inside. Should I return them? I'm afraid water might get inside and mess things up.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  19. sleepyinsanfran

    sleepyinsanfran Senior member

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    They forgot to glue the channel back on (or the glue came off). These are closed channel soles that help hide the stitch: done by splitting the leather at the edge, sewing teh welt, and gluing the flap back on. They skipped the last step on these, or the glue didn't hold.
    Not fatal and fixable, but based on how you like you new shoes to look, ymmv
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  20. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Return them. Its an defect and they shouldn't let that pair leave factory in the firs place
     

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