**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. dlind

    dlind Senior member

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    looks more like a gauge then a scratch, few layers of paste and wax should probably fill/hide it but doubt there is any way of fixing it permanently unless you wanna dye it but I wouldn't recommend that. Tbh it's in a place where no one will ever notice it if you just put on a few layers of paste and maybe some wax if you want.
     


  2. mtc2000

    mtc2000 Senior member

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    Regarding the glossy finish on most Alden Cordovan shoes. I did an experiment a few weeks ago.

    I intentionally stripped off the glossy overcoat of a new pair of Alden #8 Cordovan with plenty of chlorobenzene. Similar to Mr. Rider's demonstration. What is left is bare Cordovan.

    [​IMG]

    As a comparison, brand new "glazed" wingtip shoe on the left, deglazed boot on the right.

    [​IMG]

    I put on a coat of Renovateur and brushed for about one minute.

    [​IMG]

    Without the glossy overcoat, I am able to remove/burnish scuffs and scratches easily. Instead of "brushing for hours", I was able to remove the following fingernail scratches by brushing vigorously for just one minute.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Application of some Renovateur on the "damaged area".


    [​IMG]

    Brushed for a minute.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Later, I deglazed the boots once again. This time, I tried to duplicate what the factory did.
    With an application of acrylic finisher. I was able to simulate that factory "wet" glossy finish.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014


  3. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Acrylic peels and flakes off. Not the best finishing
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014


  4. JezeC

    JezeC Senior member

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    deleted
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014


  5. Tim Whatley

    Tim Whatley Active Member

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    I know wax polish should be applied sparingly, but is it possible to use too much cream polish? It just gets absorbed into the leather, right? I have been lathering it on pretty thick as I try to darken some shoes.
     


  6. P Hudson

    P Hudson Member

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    First of all, thank you to both you and Ron Rider for the response. Very helpful. I agree with the original comment that my shoes look pretty good. I was going to write back to that and say, "yes, but they have an almost matte finish". Then I saw your pictures. They almost make me want to give up!! I was originally comparing my Leeds to yours from a post where you said yours were only a month old. Mine are well over a year old, but haven't developed any of the character that yours had at the outset. The only reason mine look at all shiny is because of the flash/sun.

    [​IMG]

    That middle PTB in the row of three is about as beautiful as i've ever seen.
     


  7. dlind

    dlind Senior member

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    YES you can use to much and no you should be using many thin layers to create the effect you are looking for. Thick layers can have many adverse effects such as depositing visibly in creases and clogging the pores of the leather.
     


  8. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I purely hate to be defending acrylic...but that's not really or always true.

    As I said, acrylic comes in a number of different formulations. Some...many...of those formulations are specific to leather applications and the requirement of being as flexible as the leather.

    I used acrylics on boots for over 30 years. On a variety of leathers. Many of those boots came back to me repeatedly over the years. Gradually...on some leathers...the acrylic would seem to disappear or sublimate but never was that evident in a time span short enough to be noticeable as flaking and there was never any peeling.

    Again, many leathers...high end leathers...come with an acrylic finish. Direct from the tanner / currier. When is that finish flaking or peeling off? If it flaked or peeled, the end user--the shoemaker--from smallest to largest, would squeal to high heaven (I would) and refuse to buy these leathers. I've never seen peeling or flaking on finished hides.

    If you want to see real flaking, bull / spit-shine an entire shoe...as is so common nowadays in small upscale workshops...and watch what happens to the wax when you wear them for the first time.

    PS...it is hard to know what any individual shoe manufacturer will do after the fact but I don't think shell comes from the tanner with an acrylic top coat. And, IMO, adding an acrylic top coat to shell is not a good idea. Using an acrylic top coat on any leather that has been hot stuffed with oils or conditioners and / or which might have residual oils on the grain surface is going to be counter-productive.

    --
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2014


  9. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Yeah, I was referring to those kiwi shine in a sponge dyes that paint a shiny acrylic layer on your shoes. I have seen those flake off. Unfortunately I saw in first hand before I knew any better. As with anything, I'm sure there's the right way to finish using acrylic and the wrong way.
     


  10. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    [shudder]

    :tinfoil:
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2014


  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I don't really understand the angst people have over taking care of shell. I just treat mine like calf and don't have any problems:

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     


  12. mtc2000

    mtc2000 Senior member

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    DWFII

    Yes, I really don't get it with that thick acrylic overcoat on shell Cordovan. I suspect it was mostly done out of convenience. Sure the shoes have that out-of-the-box instant glossy shine, but some of the good attributes of shell are no longer there.

    For instance, scuff marks, except for the most superficial kind, are now difficult to deal with. It is often the overcoat that is scuffed. Then, we have that famed "brush-till-your-arms-fall-off" regimen. All that does is removing the overcoat, isn't it??
     


  13. RogerP

    RogerP Senior member

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    Very helpful - thanks.
     


  14. Feryll

    Feryll Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Feb 24, 2014


  15. BootSpell

    BootSpell Senior member

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    These look very much like the Woodlore Epic trees that you can get here in the US for $25-30. They are my favorite "cheap" trees and work well in my boots/shoes.
     


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