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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. The7Ups

    The7Ups Well-Known Member

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    Munky, I got some regular sized 8oz bottles of Lexol conditioner and Neetsfoot oil from Motorgeek UK last spring.

    http://www.motorgeek.co.uk/cgi-bin/ecom.cgi?Command=BrandSearch&db_manid=14

    Well worth a try and even in these sizes they go a long way.
     


  2. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    I think you also have to clarify what is meant by waterproof here. While I'm sure I'm going to an extreme here, and that Munky probably isn't discussing footwear to be worn in true "country" conditions, I think it bears mentioning that none of these traditional constructions are truly waterproof. They simply have varying degrees of water resistance. Different construction methods have been developed over the centuries to help keep feet dry, but eventually, water will find it's way in. Even if it simply soaks through the leather before it makes it's way through the other potential spaces. Using different construction, stitching, and sole mounting techniques was the best people could do before science came in a developed truly waterproof materials.

    If you want something that will keep your feet dry no matter what (short of water spilling over the top of the shoe/boot) you either have to have something made of solid rubber, or something that is lined with Gore-Tex.

    If you are walking in city conditions, then traditional Goodyear-welting with a rubber sole should be just fine unless you accidentally step in a particularly deep puddle. That is unless you are out so long that water is able to soak through the upper. In which case, it doesn't really matter how the sole is attached.

    I'm a hunter, and I regularly find myself in ankle deep mud/water that's so thick it can suck your footwear right off your feet if they aren't laced tightly. Trudging through ankle to shin deep icy water is a daily occurrence during certain seasons in my part of the world. I wouldn't trust anything short of a Gore-Tex lined boot to those conditions no matter what inseaming technique, sole sewing method, or what kind of welt was used.
     


  3. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    The7ups: thank you very much for this reference. This certainly seems to the best way to by Lexol in the UK.


    Money: yes, I wasn't really talking about 'country' use of shoes but merely referring to (rainy) weather conditions here in Wales.

    I appreciate that no sewn leather shoes can be 100% waterproof, having thought about it. I think I was a bit taken aback by a shoe company acknowledging. in their FAQs, that their shoes aren't waterproof. It seems to me that either a) they are very open and honest or b) reacting to lots of complaints about their shoes. I can't imagine Church's or C&J's declaring this issue, up front. I may well be wrong, though.
     


  4. roadway

    roadway Member

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    A quick question about cordovan, I keep reading that you shouldn't use neutral polish or cream on them. I cannot find any explanation of why. Can anyone enlighten me?
     


  5. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    I have just got an e mail back from the shoe factory that made my 'sale' shoes. I asked them if the shoes were made of corrected grain. The one line response was 'We do not use corrected grain'. The shoes certainly look and feel as though they are made of CG and the do not seem to absorb any cream or wax. Could this e mail be a way around telling me that the leather isn't too good, or should I accept what they say and be grateful for having bought a 'real' leather pair of shoes? The advert describes them as being made of 'calf leather'. In the small print it says the shoes are made in India.

    To be honest, they look awful.

    Today I decided I would never buy another pair of shoes 'blind' and would remember the old saw that if something sounds too good to be true, then it probably is too good to be true.
     


  6. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    They probably are, post pictures for better answers.
     


  7. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Hello cbfn, I'm not sure which part of my post you are talking about when you say 'they probably are'.

    Unfortunately, I am old enough not to have a mobile phone nor a camera, so I can't send photos.
     


  8. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    Can you send us a Daguerreotype then? [​IMG]
     


  9. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    [​IMG] Instead, I am doing an oil painting of them, as we speak.
     


  10. kentyman

    kentyman Senior member

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    I'd say to not spill oil on your shoes but since they're corrected grain, it'll wipe off with ease...
     


  11. sklark23

    sklark23 Senior member

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    Fully agree. All three of my hunting boots are gore-tex lined due to this.
     


  12. azumi

    azumi Senior member

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    Do you think a NEW shoes need to be treated with a layer of Saphir Dubbin Graise conditioner before applying polishing cream and wax?
     


  13. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    Sorry for the short post; from how you described the leather I believe they are corrected grain.
     


  14. YRR92

    YRR92 Senior member

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    Related to my questions about the shelf life of Reno and the Saphir cream polishes -- I went back to the shop, and the stickers on the bottom were dated 7/2009-7/2014, so I left 'em. I did buy some Saphir neutral wax, which I guess I'll use to build up a _shine_, with colored Kiwi for scuffs and neutral cream polish for conditioning.
     


  15. PCK1

    PCK1 Senior member

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    I stopped in to B. Nelson's in NYC this weekend to pick up some Saphir products.

    I was talking to the lady there that does the shoe shining asking her about matching colors.

    She said for chestnut there isn't a comparable color cream/wax so only neutral should be used. Anyone use anything else on chestnut?

    Also, she said for new shoes you should only use neutral until they've become worn a bit and need the color re-vitalized and then you can switch over to a colored cream/wax.
    Anyone ever heard that before?

    I've been having a hard time matching up colored cream/wax for G&G's.
    For my G&G vintage rioja i've chosen Saphir MDO cream 08 Bordeaux (Burgundy)
    For my G&G vintage cherry i've chosen Saphir MDO cream 09 Mahogany

    Anyone else's experiences? Especially regarding chestnut colored shoes haha.

    Thanks!
     


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