**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    I'm not sure if the comments about 'AE hating' were addressed to me but bear in mind that I live in the UK. Loakes are available and AE aren't. As someone who is retired, I don't have cash to splash about either. We buy what we can afford and I can't afford much.
     
  2. dohare

    dohare Senior member

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    not directed at you at all, it wasn't meant to be a negative comment at all really though haha. no worries.
     
  3. CalzolaiFeF

    CalzolaiFeF Well-Known Member

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  4. jssdc

    jssdc Senior member

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    Wasn't his point that Reno isn't a great conditioner so using it as such will leave your shoes unconditioned and hence they will dry out? I agree, though, that this is a good point and one that I have taken under advisement in my shoe care regimen.
     
  5. Nakedsnake

    Nakedsnake Senior member

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    Question about shell cordovan, how should one go about properly conditioning this leather? I have AE burgundy Shell Dalton's that I think could use a litle hydration. Up until now, i've just used AE cordovan creme sparingly, and it seems to be doing a decent job. But I would like something without pigment, if possible. Is lexol good for this? What about saphir neutral cordovan creme? Any input would be appreciated.
     
  6. Itsuo

    Itsuo Senior member

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    I usually hit mine with Saphir Renovateur, horsehair buff, Saphir Cordovan cream, horsehair buff, Saphir wax for the toe and rears, and then buff that with a soft felt-like cloth.

    I don't always feel like they're perfectly conditioned after, especially in the vamp where the continuous creasing always appears or fatigue the leather. So, I'm open to hearing what others think.

    A post polish pic in the wild:

    [​IMG]


    This thread gave me some inspiration so I gave attention to my line up last weekend....

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014
  7. PCK1

    PCK1 Senior member

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    Just gave my Crockett & Jones Saville (337 Last - Dark Brown Antique Calf) a nice high gloss shine. As you can see from the serious cracks in the leather I have run these shoes through hell and back. They were born into a life of beer soaked floors of lousy dive bars, graduated to business and international travel and many treks through poor poor weather. Nonetheless, with a good shine they still look pretty damn good.

    My method for a relatively quick shine:
    - Thoroughly brush the shoes with a horsehair brush. Use a moist cloth to rid the shoes of any hard to remove dirt, etc.

    - Using a cloth rub some rejuvenating cream (saphir renovateur or other) in small circular motions evenly throughout the surface of the shoe> Let the shoe rest 5-10 minutes.

    - Give the shoe another quick run over with horsehair brush/cloth

    - Using a dauber brush wax polish evenly throughout the shoe in small circular motions. let shoe rest 5-10 minutes

    - Apply another coat of wax polish

    - Brush shoes thoroughly with horsehair brush

    - Wrap a cloth around two fingers, apply some wax polish to the cloth, dip into a small amount of water making sure not to wet the cloth too much. In small circular motions getting with softer and softer pressure as you proceed polish the shoe to get that shine coming through. Repeat this process until they are nice and shiny.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. phototristan

    phototristan Senior member

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    I wonder if this new stuff is safe for shell cordovan:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. PCK1

    PCK1 Senior member

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    Would be interesting to hear from someone that is willing to try it/has tried it.

    Me personally, I don't think cordovan needs any treating like that. Its durable enough as is. Mine kick ass through all kinds of crap and still look great.
     
  10. anrobit

    anrobit Senior member

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    I have a pair of AE walnut daltons, and found the leather to be quite dry right out of the box. I used a few light coats of coconut oil to hydrate them, and it seems to have worked well. The boots darken at first, but after an hour they're right back to their original shade. They feel much better now as well.

    If you have doubts about coconut oil, it's used as the conditioner base in some of the best conditioners in the world (see GlenKaren)
     
  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    For shell, I use GlenKaren cream polish on the vamp and I use use Saphir wax on the rest. I then use GlenKaren high shine paste on the toe and heel. As stated the GlenKaren cream has coconut oil and more than enough for a good conditioning and polish.

    Saphir Cordovan cream is good stuff actually. It contains a bit of neats foot oil, which is good for oily leathers like shell. I'd have no hesitation using this product as a conditioner on shell.

    In the past I have used Lexol across the vamp and just wax all over the shoe. I never had any issues with that process at all.

    I would say any of the above work very well. The whole bullshit mac method as I have stated many, many time is full of holes and isn't really the best for people who use their shoes more than twice a year.
     
  12. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    If you lose a substantial amount of weight, do your feet get smaller?
     
  13. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Yes, I lost 100 pounds and went down 1.5 shoe sizes.
     
  14. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Thanks, Patrick. It raises the question of what you do with your shoes. Do you pad them out with insoles?

    Talking of insoles, I have yet to buy a pair of shoes that didn't need either an insole or a an arch support of some sort. I guess that I must fall in-between sizes. It ain't that simple, either, as sizes of shoes vary considerably. I would have thought that, once, every so often, I would find a pair that fitted me without the extra inserts.
     
  15. CalzolaiFeF

    CalzolaiFeF Well-Known Member

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    I think you only need a shoe with a built-in arch support. Unfortunately I think the only one who make that kind of work are bespoke makers.
     

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