**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The skin on my feet is pretty tough. A long time ago I got blisters, but you continue on and like DW said soon enough your feet don't even feel it.
     


  2. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

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    I see. I suppose when you pay a bunch for a shoe you're
    gonna wear it regardless haha Thanks a lot, guys. I'll try
    and wear these types of shoes at least a few times a week
    then.
     


  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    You just don't remember like I do (I'm old)...

    When I was a small child and I got my first pair of real, sure-'nuff, lace-up shoes, I got blisters then too. Almost anyone who is trying to wear a good, high quality leather shoe for the first time in their lives is gonna experience some variation of this problem.
     


  4. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

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    That's good to know. I've just recently been buying nicer clothes so I figured
    it was time to grow up a bit. I got my first nicer pair of shoes about seven years
    ago for a Christmas party at work and I may have worn them 10 times since then.
    I took PatrickBOOTH's advice a few weeks ago and started to read through this
    thread from the beginning. I'm currently on page 50 or so. I've already learned a
    lot and I just like knowing things in general so this has been a pretty cool experience
    overall and most people on this forum are generally pretty nice.
     


  5. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

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    So I have an old pair of Allen Edmonds that I dont really like the finish on.
    I got them used cause they were cheap and I'm not quite sure if the color
    was supposed to be a really dark burgundy or a dark brown. It kind of
    changes depending on lighting conditions, but here it looks burgundy. I'm
    wanting to probably strip all the old wax and dirt off to see the basic color.

    Last night I tried some Lexol to clean it up first, then put a coat of Renovateur on
    there and let it sit for 3-5 minutes and it was super difficult to get off. It made
    the shoe almost sticky. Is that all the old crap on the shoe that decided it didn't
    want to come off or did I wait too long? I noticed that what did come off wax-wise
    looked a reddish purple so I'm assuming they used burgundy waxes on it.

    I'm thinking it may need something stronger at this point. Should I buy some Reno Mat
    or there something more accessible I can try?


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  6. jasonmx3

    jasonmx3 Senior member

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    This is a 10-year old pair and is currently the oldest shoe that I have in my rotation. It was in storage for several years before I decided to take it out and start using it again. I've noticed that the leather has become very dry (esp. in the areas where there's a lot of creasing). I've applied several coats of leather lotion (Bally, Ecco) and although it helped a bit, the leather still looks dry. I am worried that the leather might eventually crack if I don't do anything. Any suggestions on what product I should use or what I should do with it (Saphir Renovateur, etc.)?

    Thanks!
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014


  7. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    AE uses these weird pressurized sprayers that mechanics and body mean use for applying paint to cars. I actually did a polish job on a friend of mine's black Park Ave's recently and I was weirded out by the finish. They don't seem to take polish very well for whatever reason, but I suspect that they put some sort of shellack or something on them, some sort of "finishing touch". The best way to remove a finish completely and start again is rubbing the shoe down to Renomat, putting a couple of coats of Lexol on them afterwards and letting it soak in well, and then using colored cream to slowly rebuild the finish. This takes a lot of time and patience. If you glob too much polish on there at once they shoes will look gunky and matte so you have to put on thin coats buffing in between each coat. There is a bit of an art to achieving the finish you want so you make not want to do this yourself. Their is a Shoe Antiquing thread that has some good info on how to do this. When you said your shoe feels sticky after using the renovateur. This is my experience as well when you let it sit on the shoe too long. It gets very hard to buff out for whatever reason. The best way to use the stuff is to apply it and don't wait any longer than about 2 minutes before buffing, then again time and time again I only recommend the stuff for renewing life to the toe and heel in between polishing sessions.
    I have no idea about those "lotions" you put on those, but they are most likely going to worsen the condition rather than help. I find that most products contain some sort of silicones that choke the leather out. If I were you I would get some Lexol Conditioner and work that in really well and let it dry. Then I would use a high quality shoe cream (Saphir, Glenkaren) in thin coats buffing in between coats. For finishing I would use a high quality wax for the toe and heel area. (Saphir, GlenKaren)
     


  8. jasonmx3

    jasonmx3 Senior member

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    ^^Thanks, PB. I believe I'll be able to get Lexol online as well as the other creams/waxes.

    Just a follow-up question: How often do you use Lexol on your shoes? Is it something that you're supposed to use regularly or only when you're trying to revive really dry leather?
     


  9. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

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    I wish somewhere around me sold RenoMat instead of
    having to get it online. Maybe I'll find a shoe shop with
    some.

    A labor of love, huh? Actually sounds like a fun project.
    I'll check out that antiquing thread, though. Thanks, man
     


  10. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

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    I found big jugs of Lexol on Amazon Prime:

    http://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1112-Le...?ie=UTF8&qid=1389276560&sr=8-7&keywords=lexol

    http://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1013-Le...?ie=UTF8&qid=1389276560&sr=8-2&keywords=lexol

    http://www.amazon.com/Lexol-0922-Le...?ie=UTF8&qid=1389276560&sr=8-4&keywords=lexol

    Edit*: This may not be the cheapest, but it gets to you in two days.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014


  11. jasonmx3

    jasonmx3 Senior member

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    Thanks, SWRT. That's also partly the reason for my question. If it's something that I'll be using often enough, I might just order the 1 liter container -- just need to add a few bucks!
     


  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I personally don't use it much anymore. I just use GlenKaren cream polish because it as a ton of oils in it that serve the same purpose. I am just more likely to recommend Lexol to people because people generally shy away from unfamiliar products, or things not easily obtained. I certainly recommend Lexol more than any of the other relatively easily available products.

    There aren't hard, fast rules for this stuff. Sometimes you just have to go with your gut. I wouldn't use it after every wear, I probably wouldn't use it every other, but daily routinely I would say. I would say using it lightly more frequently is probably better than globbing on a ton of it once per year.


    If you don't want to wait for the Renomat (which you should, it makes it much easier) you could get Angelus Deglazer, or Meltonian Color Preparer, which does a similar job.
     


  13. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

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    Then waiting it is. Thanks for the help, man. When I finally get these shoes
    done I'll post the results up here. May be a while. Getting married in a few
    days so a lot's been going on.
     


  14. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  15. SuitedDx

    SuitedDx Senior member

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    I wanted to put up a comparison pic for those that get REALLY worried matching shades and colors. Below are a picture of my boots with the uppers treated with Saphir wax in black and the shaft with Saphir wax in Navy (leather balm was used for conditioning beforehand): [​IMG] I don't tend to put a lot on so a couple thin layers throughout the shoe. For reference, here are the same boots before when I just used Saphir neutral wax: [​IMG] The lighting is grossly similar and you can see the color difference is BARELY noticeable. I mention Saphir because my experience with Kiwi is that the latter has a thicker consistency which cakes on the leather more whereas Saphir allows for thinner coats. Nothing groundbreaking but I hope this alleviates some of the anxieties about PERFECTLY matching things...maybe I'm just not as picky about these things...
     


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