**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,329
    Likes Received:
    2,950
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    Well there are all sorts of reasons why I believe a stacked leather heel is superior--Tradition, stability at height, adaptability to bottom contours, angles, shapes, width and length variation, maximizing resources, durability, as well as the ability (in the right hands) to repair / replace worn lifts without damaging the outsole or upper.

    Also a stacked leather heel can be securely mounted on a good leather outsole with wooden pegs...obviating the need for nails driven into and clinched on the insole. And all the long term damage that goes along with iron exposed to salt water.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2014


  2. umbrella613

    umbrella613 Active Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Location:
    New York, NY
    :embar:
     


  3. umbrella613

    umbrella613 Active Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Location:
    New York, NY
    ^^ for kentyman's sharp observation ;)
     


  4. kloss

    kloss Senior member

    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    27
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2013
    I have a pair of boots with horse hair lining. Does this require any special care? Are shoe trees sufficient?

    And for shoes with pony hair on the outside vamp: are they more or less waterproof than regular leather?
     


  5. themonster

    themonster Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2012
    Just a friendly reminder to people living in snowy areas:

    Not sure if this is limited to the Chicago area, but whatever chemicals they put on salt completely destroyed my boots. I noticed leather fibers rubbing off as I wiped them down. [​IMG] Keep in mind, these boots have been Sno-seal'd at least every other months.
     


  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,479
    Likes Received:
    8,847
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Leather fibers rubbing off? Post pictures. Generally vinegar gets out salt stains, but in general, yes salt is one of the ultimate enemies of leather.
     


  7. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,329
    Likes Received:
    2,950
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    Any highly industrialized urban area will have smog--sulfur, lead, cadmium & other heavy metals as well as various hydro-carbons in the air.

    Rain in such areas ends up being a dilute form of sulfuric acid. Not strong enough to burn your skin obviously but strong enough to eat away at marble statues and so forth. Draw your own conclusions.

    --
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2014


  8. themonster

    themonster Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2012
    http://i.imgur.com/M4ieOR9.jpg

    Terrible pic
     


  9. SuitedDx

    SuitedDx Senior member

    Messages:
    4,654
    Likes Received:
    765
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Location:
    The Forum
    
    I live in MI now so I am definitely experiencing the snowfall! I lived in NYC though, which probably used as much salt as Chi-town, but none of my boots (C&J, Tricker's, AS) were affected to the point of "fibers rubbing off;" they were Sno Sealed. The sneaky killer is the next few weeks after the snow. When the snow melts or when it rains and the liquid mixes with the salt, I found that more damaging because it soaked into my shoes. Fortunately I don't have to deal with for a while with the 18+ inches outside my office...
     


  10. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,479
    Likes Received:
    8,847
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    

    Can't really discern anything from that photo. It just looks to me that it took of the finishing on the leather, not "leather fibers".
     


  11. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2013
    So every pair of dress shoes I've ever owned always make the back of my heels
    hurt when wearing them. They'll feel fine for about 10 minutes, then it starts to
    annoy me. The top of the shoe always presses into the back of my foot is the
    best way I can describe it. I own a few pairs of 11.5's and a few 12's and they've
    always done this, whether new or old. I have two Florsheim's (one new, one old),
    a Joseph Abboud (new), a pair of AE's (old) and a pair of Nunn Bush (old) and they
    all do it. Granted, none of them are super high end shoes, but they're not cheap
    Walmart shoes either. Is it just irritating because I wear tennis shoes most days?
    Something I need to get used to? Or does the back of the shoe need to be broken
    in a certain way? Perhaps there's an insert I can get...I'm really at a loss. Any ideas
    would be great. Thanks guys!
     


  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,479
    Likes Received:
    8,847
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    My guess is you don't wear them with enough frequency for your heel skin to get accustomed to it. Like you said maybe your feet that have been shrouded in plush cotton and synthetics are just hypersensitive?

    Or it could be that you have been buying shoes that don't fit. Maybe post pics of your feet in them.
     


  13. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2013
    So do people's feet develop calluses to combat that over time?


    The lighting in my office makes my socks look blue, oddly enough.
    These are the old pair of Florsheim's.

    Is this the kind of picture you'd need?

    [​IMG]
     


  14. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,329
    Likes Received:
    2,950
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    Yes.

    I wore nothing but "cowboy" boots for the better part of 40 years. When I started making shoes, I started wearing them. They rubbed the back of my heel enough to create blisters. I put a bandaid on it and toughed it out. Now I'm perfectly comfortable in the same shoes all day.

    You're not going to get a callus on the back of your heel but the skin will thicken a little and become tougher.

    There are people all over the world that don't wear any shoes at all despite traveling in rough country. Imagine what the bottom of their feet look like.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014


  15. SWRT

    SWRT Active Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2013
    You make your own shoes?

    A bandaid...simple; smart. I wasn't sure if it was a common thing or if I was just buying
    the wrong kind of shoes. I guess I'll just have to wear them more often. Thanks, man.

    And yeah...I was like that as a kid. I never wore shoes. I could have probably walked
    on broken glass and not cut my feet back then.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by