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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Of course, it depends on what the heel stiffener is made of. Many manufactured shoes use a resin impregnated fiber mat called "celastic." You're not going to soften that no matter what you do...short of destroying your shoes.

    Other makers use paper or leatherboard. You soften it at your own peril...like softening particleboard.

    If the heel stiffener is made of leather, you could try softening it by infusing warm water from the inside of the shoe. Get it too wet, however, and you'll end up with water stains on the outside of the shoe.

    A good leather heel stiffener will acquire some flexibility and/or softness with wear, and over time. But in truth, heel stiffeners are not meant to soften--their purpose is to "stiffen." Funny how that works. :cool:

    I've seen...and worn...vintage shoes that had heel stiffeners that were literally hard as a rock. No problem. And some old finders catalogues offered pre-cut heel stiffeners that are touted as being extra hard.

    You may feel that the stiffener needs softening because it is chafing or hurting your foot. But the last is most likely the culprit there. Or fit. Or even poor patterning.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2014
  2. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    It would be an easy problem to solve if its just improper fit.

    I have a problem where I have a lump bone chip at my right heel thats not outright visible and hard to measure/trace; it clearly there on x-rays. I have a pair of boots that sometimes aggravate the lump after a few hours of walking and I sometimes get blisters.

    I am suspecting a poor patterning/skiving job, but will play around with knocking the heel stiffener softer. It's most probably celastic.
     
  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Well, bone spurs on the heel are quite common problems that bespoke or MTO can, and do, address.

    If the last is too straight at the back of the heel...and I've seen more than a few like that, right here on SF...it may exacerbate the problem, as well.
     
  4. smoothie1

    smoothie1 Senior member

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    Deleted.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2014
  5. gsgleason

    gsgleason Senior member

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    What size insert did you get and for what size leeds?
     
  6. lektrix

    lektrix Well-Known Member

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    Can someone please point me to the page that contains tutorials, photos, etc?

    I just bought a pair of Allen Edmonds 4-5 months ago and have been wearing them indoors only.... came to work one morning and saw a giant scuff on one side, around 4-5 inches long :(.

    I'd be pretty bummed out if it cannot be fixed.
     
  7. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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  8. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Most things can be fixed, or concealed pretty well. It is probably nothing to worry about.
     
  9. gsgleason

    gsgleason Senior member

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    First, have you been polishing? A layer of polish provides protection against scuffs, so you should be doing that.

    Generally it comes down to just buffing and re-polishing, and possibly filling in scratches with wax.
     
  10. Murlsquirl

    Murlsquirl Senior member Moderator

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    Cross post from Carmina:

    I did my research and read about the "Carmina squeak", but didn't find a solution. I have a few pairs, but only one right shoe makes a terrible squeak/creak when I walk. It is embarrassing. The issue is in the footbed and does not occur when I bend the shoes in my hand. With the shoes on, it starts immediately as my heel lifts from the ground. It also make the noise if I just rub my toes in the sole. It almost sounds like a damn duck quack. I'd appreciate any help I can get. Forgive me if I didn't use the correct terms when trying to describe where the sound is coming from.
     
  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I had this issue with G&G's I owned. Resoling didn't solve the issue.
     
  12. Murlsquirl

    Murlsquirl Senior member Moderator

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    Yeah, I was just talking to Stitch and he told me about that. Sh*t.
     
  13. Kahuna75

    Kahuna75 Senior member

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    Leed 13 E the AE Ortho insert was a Large(12-13)
     
  14. sleepyinsanfran

    sleepyinsanfran Senior member

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    I bought a pair of grensons last year which had the same problem. My guess was that the squeak came from the insole rubbing on the cork filler in the toe region, but I didnt bother to have them fixed and returned the pair.

    if yours is beyond returnable condition you might try wearing them around the house (perhaps entertain your kid if you have children!) and wait for the footbed to settle and hope it goes away.
     
  15. Itsuo

    Itsuo Senior member

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    I had the same problem with a pair of G&Gs and read what happed to @patrickBOOTHso I had them resoled and then sold them. I know some pairs give a slight discreet noise , but I find that loud creak unacceptable. I would try to contact Carmina?
     
  16. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Creaking is generally from leather rubbing against leather but it could be leather rubbing against cork esp. if hot melt cork filler is used.

    But you have so many places that leather can rub against itself if cements are applied so parsimoniously that they cannot form a sold bond.

    Often in factory work especially, the heel block is supplied as a unit with each layer "bonded" the the previous one with pastes, which can breakdown when exposed to a lot of moisture. And to add to that problem, often times the heel block itself is simply nailed to the heel seat with little or no paste or cement. That right there is a surefire recipe for creaks.

    Sometimes a paucity of paste in between the heel stiffener and the lining or the stiffener and the counter can be a source of creaking. And in most of these cases, re-soling never touches the problem.

    The upshot is that creaks can come from near 'bout anywhere in the shoe but it is no accident that some makers never have problems with creaking and others seem to get a reputation for it.

    If it's any consolation, there was a time when creaking shoes were considered high status simply because it indicated new shoes.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2014
  17. Murlsquirl

    Murlsquirl Senior member Moderator

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    Thank you for all of the responses. I really appreciate it. I did notice that the creaking faded as the day went on so hopefully the problem will solve itself in time.
     
  18. DenverShoeShine

    DenverShoeShine New Member

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    Dardano's on Colorado. They have been in business since 1938, doing shoe repair. It's a family owned and operated business.
    Disclaimer: I work there as a shoe shine. The review is based on work I have had done there, as well as what I see go out the door, not on my position as an employee.
     
  19. aglose

    aglose Senior member

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    ^ too late man, already sent them to a carmina recommended cobbler in new York. Will dardanos do a full sole/heel replacement on a pair of Aldens?
     
  20. DenverShoeShine

    DenverShoeShine New Member

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    They will, indeed. Not sure on the price, but should be around 70.00. As an aside, they do a shine (at the repair facility) on shoes that they repair... Ask them to send the shoes back to me to do for you, instead. You'll get a better result.
     

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